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SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists announced Tuesday they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is now a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
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NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Weekdays and winter are an ideal match for low rates at lodgings inside Zion and Sequoia & Kings Canyon national parks. Fewer visitors and snow are bonuses for those ready to bundle up to explore the off-season side of these parklands in Utah and California. Deal 1: Zion National Park was created in 1919 and was the first national park in Utah. Zion Lodge offers a package that comes with breakfast for two and costs $139 a night for a room, $149 for a cabin and $179 for a suite.
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TRAVEL
March 8, 1987
In June, 1984 I read an article about a chateau in Quineville, France, by Jerry Payne and it touched my heart. He told of how in D-Day fighting in 1944 three GIs had been killed helping to retake the chateau; in the assault, an elm in the chateau courtyard was shattered, but the owner, Raymond Lemesle, restored to his property, left the stark tree as a memorial to the soldiers, and lay wildflowers at its base each day. Finally, the stricken tree...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists recently announced that they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | United Press International
The presidential yacht Sequoia, saved by a trust from becoming a floating nightclub, underwent trials in the Elizabeth River today to check its seaworthiness after a $2-million stem-to-stern refurbishing. If the 104-foot yacht passes its sea trials, it will sail June 27 to New York to participate in the Fourth of July rededication of the Statue of Liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists recently announced that they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989
A 13-year-old Simi Valley girl was in extremely critical condition Thursday after being hit by a car while walking across a street on her way to school, police said. Jennifer Joyce was struck at 8 a.m. by a car driven by Karen Smith, 39, of Lancaster, Simi Valley Police Lt. Don Austin said. The girl was in a crosswalk at Medina and Sequoia avenues when she was hit by the car traveling south on Sequoia, Austin said. Joyce was taken to Simi Valley Adventist Hospital with major head wounds and internal injuries, authorities said.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In the race to build the fastest computer in the world, America is back on top. On Monday, a super-computer designed by IBM for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), took the first spot on the Top 500 list, a list that comes out twice a year ranking the 500 fastest computers on the planet.  It is the first time the U.S. has topped the list since November 2009.  The winning super-computer is called Sequoia, and it is housed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.  Sequoia will be used to build complex models that let scientists test the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons without having to do nuclear testing in the real world.  So how fast is the fastest computer in the world?
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- In the late 19th century and early 20th century, black troopers called the "Buffalo Soldiers" patrolled Yosemite and Sequoia national parks in California. But many visitors to the national parks are unaware of the role played by these troops. A House-approved bill seeks to change that, requiring a study on ways to highlight the Buffalo Soldiers' contributions to the parks. Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough), who sponsored the measure, said it would call attention to an often-overlooked chapter in the nation's history and enhance the parks experience for millions of visitors.
NEWS
August 23, 2005
While criticizing Bearpaw camp in Sequoia ["Sierra Divide," Aug. 16], the Sierra Club continues to operate nearly a dozen camps, huts and lodges, all within national forest and wilderness settings. Guess they're upset because someone else is making the money. TRENT SANDERS La Canada Flintridge Sheer granite, river canyons, waterfalls and gorges bond those who hike those trails. This ethereal beauty is diminished when you round the trail to a porch full of "guests" kicking back with their cold Heinekens.
SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists announced Tuesday they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is now a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
Clare Cogan and Daniel Mohally stood forlornly inside the Yosemite Visitors Bureau, trying to figure out how to salvage their honeymoon. The Cork, Ireland, couple had flown to the United States last week for a honeymoon trip that started in San Diego and will end in San Francisco. But the highlight of their trip was meant to be an excursion to Yosemite. “We grew up seeing pictures of it in books,” Cogan, a 31-year-old receptionist, said Tuesday. “You know, the cars underneath those huge Sequoia trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. - Each afternoon the fire's thunderous plume rose. At night, helicopter crews at the Crane Flat lookout watched a line of orange burning across the horizon. The line kept drawing closer. By the last week of August, every effort to halt the Rim fire before it moved deeper into the national park had failed. The blaze now had a clear path to the Tuolumne and Merced groves of giant sequoia, and the Rockefeller grove, one of the last stands of giant sugar pine untouched by logging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Finally, some good news about the effects of climate change. It may have triggered a growth spurt in two of California's iconic tree species: coast redwoods and giant sequoias. Since the 1970s, some coast redwoods have grown at the fastest rate ever, according to scientists who studied corings from trees more than 1,000 years old. "That's a wonderful, happy surprise for us," said Emily Burns, science director at the Save the Redwoods League, which is collaborating on a long-term study with university researchers on the effect of climate change on redwoods, the world's tallest trees, and giant sequoias, the largest living things by total mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
A body was recovered in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park on Saturday near where search crews have been combing the rugged terrain for a missing hiker. The body was found about 1,000 feet above Monarch Lake, just below a portion of the Sawtooth Trail, according to National Park Service spokesman Matt Fagan. Authorities temporarily suspended the search for missing hiker Johnnie Jean Daniel pending identification of the body. Daniel, 65, of San Rafael, was reported missing Thursday by a family member after Daniel failed to return from a hike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
MARTINEZ, Calif. - It would be hard to equal John Muir's love for the giant sequoia, a majestic California native that can live 3,000 years and soar 250 feet high. "The King tree & me have sworn eternal love," he wrote to a friend in the fall of 1870, "sworn it without swearing and Ive taken the sacrament with Douglass Squirrels drank Sequoia wine, Sequoia blood, & with its rosy purple drips I am writing this woody gospel letter. " A decade or so later, the besotted conservationist returned from a Sierra Nevada jaunt with a seedling wrapped in a damp handkerchief.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2006
MANY years ago, we had a tent cabin ["Sierra Bliss, Without Roughing It," Weekend Escape, Sept. 24] at a different Sequoia camp. It was cold. A stove or something furnished heat. It also caught the roof on fire, just a slow smoldering, resulting in a 2-foot hole and new accommodations for us. MIKE KIRWAN Venice Send letters to Travel, L.A. Times, 202 W. 1st St., L.A., CA 90012; e-mail to travel@latimes.com. Letters will be edited.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The silver lining, almost literally, to this winter's drought is the stark high country images of rock and ice .  Catching photographers' interest:  frozen waterfalls and Alpine lakes that would normally be buried in Sierra snow . . . .  Also of note,  California's National Parks are accessible in ways they normally aren't this time of year. In Sequoia, for example, Crescent Meadow Road, which leads to Moro Rock, has temporarily reopened. Visitors can still hike the nearly 400 steps to the top of the granite dome to witness striking winter sunsets.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- In the late 19th century and early 20th century, black troopers called the "Buffalo Soldiers" patrolled Yosemite and Sequoia national parks in California. But many visitors to the national parks are unaware of the role played by these troops. A House-approved bill seeks to change that, requiring a study on ways to highlight the Buffalo Soldiers' contributions to the parks. Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough), who sponsored the measure, said it would call attention to an often-overlooked chapter in the nation's history and enhance the parks experience for millions of visitors.
TRAVEL
March 23, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
Wuksachi Lodge, built in 1999, is the newest of the lodges in the Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. As a winter vacation, we enjoyed hiking through Sequoia's Giant Forest and snowshoeing and cross-country skiing on local trails. We were impressed by the cleared and sanded paths after a snowstorm and the complimentary snow-chain installation. The choice and quality of the food in the restaurant were way above our expectations. Wuksachi Lodge, Sequoia National Park; (866) 807-3598, (559)
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