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Sequoia National Forest

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NEWS
July 21, 1990 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Logging will be limited in Sequoia National Forest and giant sequoias will be fully protected under an agreement among the state and federal governments, loggers, conservationists and others, the U.S. Forest Service said Friday. The agreement, reached after nearly 17 months of talks, will ban logging in giant sequoia groves and reduce by 22% the annual average harvest in the rest of the forest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Forty rescue workers from two counties were searching for a 27-year-old hunter in Sequoia National Forest. Salvador Sanchez of Orosi hiked with another man toward Deer Meadow about 5 p.m. Saturday to scout potential hunting locations while a third man stayed with their vehicle. The hikers became separated and Sanchez never returned. Nearby campers called the Tulare County Sheriff's Department about 10:30 p.m. The temperature Saturday night dipped to about 9 degrees and was expected to be in the 20s Monday night.
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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
A rapidly expanding wildfire has torched more than 25,000 acres in the Sequoia National Forest, threatening homes and forcing residents to evacuate. With low humidity and blustery winds of up to 15 mph, the blaze doubled in size in 24 hours, said Doug Johnston, a Kern County fire engineer. "It was a very volatile day, as they say on Wall Street," Johnston said. The fire, which was 35% contained Thursday, was only 29% contained Friday, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
MARTIN Litton eased his bulky frame out of the cramped back seat of a Subaru sedan and walked across the road. "Let's get a look at the mess they've made here," he said, his blue eyes darting to fresh tree stumps and logging trails gouged into the pale, dusty earth of the southern Sierra. He climbed slowly up an embankment and started snapping photographs. Litton is two months short of 90, hard of hearing and equipped with two artificial knees.
SPORTS
May 29, 1996 | PETE THOMAS
High on a mountain above town, riding on the Trail of the Bear, the man known around here as "Mad Dog" took a short detour and led his group to one of his favorite places, a rocky bluff affording a spectacular view of the surrounding wilderness. In the vast valley below was Isabella Lake, a sparkling blue reservoir fed by the mighty Kern River, which in turn is fed by melting snow miles away, pouring through the Mt. Whitney drainage.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
Four wildfires burned in wilderness areas throughout California on Saturday while neighborhoods and ranches in the shadow of one fire stood ready to flee if necessary. The 18,900-acre fire near Lake Piru in Ventura County was one of two burning in Los Padres National Forest northwest of Los Angeles. The other, 20 miles east of Santa Maria along the Santa Barbara-San Luis Obispo county line, burned 58,000 acres and was 62% contained.
TRAVEL
July 9, 1995 | JIM HOLLANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Hollander is a Times copy editor
My wife and I have often lamented that whenever we travel, someone invariably informs us that we should have been there last week, or last month or last year, because that's when wherever we are was at its absolute best. If it weren't for the fact that we always enjoy ourselves anyhow, we'd surely have boulder-size chips on our shoulders by now. But a mid-June camping trip to Sequoia National Park cured us forever of this latent inferiority complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tulare County sheriff's deputies are investigating the slaying of a Newport Beach woman who was shot to death at a rustic mountain resort her family owns near the redwood spires and granite peaks of the southern Sierra Nevada. Lt. Stan Tollison said Wednesday that Bonnie J. Hood, 46, was fatally wounded in the head with a pistol about 3:20 a.m. Sunday in her cabin at Camp Nelson Lodge on the edge of Sequoia National Forest. Her body was found in a bedroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities seized 5,000 marijuana plants worth an estimated $20 million found growing in Sequoia National Forest. The find comes a week after discovery of 13,000 plants worth $54 million in a remote area of nearby Sequoia National Park.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | STEVE HYMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the summer rush to the alpine splendors of the Eastern Sierra, many campers stomp on the accelerator and don't look up until they have sunk their teeth into the chili-cheese bread at Schats Bakery in Bishop. They're making a mistake. One of the prettiest and least visited parts of the range is the southern Sierra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Monday stopped a logging project in Giant Sequoia National Monument, keeping intact more than 1,000 acres in a preserve that houses two-thirds of the world's largest trees. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer issued a preliminary injunction blocking a timber sale known as the Ice Project, saying that the U.S. Forest Service had ignored extensive research on how commercial logging would affect wildlife in the region. The lawsuit was brought by several environmental groups.
TRAVEL
August 28, 2005 | Dan Blackburn, Special to The Times
MY neighbor tempted me with the notion: a magical mountain campsite. No-hassle reservations. Only half a day's drive from Los Angeles. Car camping without being campfire-to-campfire with 100 other people? In one of the most popular areas of the most populous state in the union? In the summer? Was it possible? The affirmation came in the form of Quaking Aspen, a campground inside the national monument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities seized 5,000 marijuana plants worth an estimated $20 million found growing in Sequoia National Forest. The find comes a week after discovery of 13,000 plants worth $54 million in a remote area of nearby Sequoia National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A year after suffering the worst wildfire in this forest's history, residents and forestry officials say the landscape is healing and campers are returning. The wildfire that started on July 21, 2002, burned 150,696 acres over four months -- taking 2,000 firefighters six weeks to contain at a cost of $60 million. A Bakersfield woman was sentenced to 18 months in prison earlier this month after pleading guilty to starting the fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A plan to restore the Sequoia National Forest after a 150,000-acre wildfire is sparking ire among environmental groups. The U.S. Forest Service proposed to log burned trees on about 13,300 acres. An additional 4,400 acres could be logged along stream corridors. The Forest Service proposed to log by helicopter in order to avoid building roads. Officials also would leave some dead trees for wildlife habitat. The plan, one of four under review, calls for burning brush and trimmings trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The woman accused of starting a fire that blackened more than 150,000 acres of the Sequoia National Forest last summer would spend 18 months in prison under a plea agreement filed Friday in U.S. District Court. Peri Dare Van Brunt is scheduled to enter guilty pleas Monday to three federal misdemeanors, each with a maximum sentence of six months. The so-called McNally fire was the worst in the park's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Opponents of Giant Sequoia National Monument are appealing a judge's decision to dismiss their lawsuit challenging the creation of the preserve. Tulare County, along with timber interests and back-country vehicle users, will appeal the decision in U.S. District Court in Washington. The group had claimed that President Bill Clinton abused his authority by creating the 327,769-acre monument in Sequoia National Forest.
NEWS
April 4, 1988
Booby traps have been found in remote areas of Sequoia National Forest, apparently set by people who have marijuana plantations they do not want anyone to see, federal officials said. One device consisted of several nails cast into a lead base and placed on a trail. Another consisted of several sharpened sticks tied together that could have been activated by a trip wire, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Sequoia ForestKeeper, a local environmental group, is criticizing plans to cut trees in an area of the Sequoia National Forest destroyed by fire last summer, calling the plan a timber sale. Under the Sherman Pass Restoration Project, the U.S. Forest Service proposes to remove 90% of standing burned trees on about 6,000 acres of 150,000 acres charred in the McNally fire. Officials plan to sell the wood as lumber, firewood or biomass fuel.
OPINION
January 29, 2003
Judging from a U.S. Forest Service plan released last month, the Bush administration still thinks the way to save a forest is to log it. This time, however, it's not just any forest: It's the Giant Sequoia National Monument, created by President Clinton in 2000 to give its magnificent trees the sort of protection they lacked as part of a less-sheltered national forest.
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