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Sequoia Trees

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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
A coalition of environmental groups filed court papers Tuesday, seeking to save a federal act that protects giant sequoia trees. The coalition is seeking to join the U.S. government as defendants in a suit brought by logging interests, recreational groups and Tulare County. If the motion is granted, the coalition will move to dismiss the suit, said Michael Sherwood, an attorney with Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2005 | From Wire Service Reports
Old age has gotten the best of the second-biggest tree in the world. The giant sequoia known as the Washington Tree may not live much longer after suffering major damage in recent weeks from heavy snow and strong winds, Sequoia National Park officials said. The tree once stood more than 254 feet tall with a base circumference of slightly more than 101 feet.
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NEWS
April 8, 2000 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving a step closer to the creation of another national monument in California, federal officials recommended Friday that President Clinton set aside 355,000 acres of a Sierra Nevada national forest to protect extensive groves of ancient sequoia trees. Clinton, who recently established several new monuments in California and Arizona, is expected to act quickly to establish the monument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2003 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
When 34 groves of giant sequoias and 300,000 surrounding acres were named a national monument by President Clinton during his final year in office, a long fight over protection of some of Earth's most majestic trees appeared to end. It didn't. Last month, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2005 | From Wire Service Reports
Old age has gotten the best of the second-biggest tree in the world. The giant sequoia known as the Washington Tree may not live much longer after suffering major damage in recent weeks from heavy snow and strong winds, Sequoia National Park officials said. The tree once stood more than 254 feet tall with a base circumference of slightly more than 101 feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2003 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
When 34 groves of giant sequoias and 300,000 surrounding acres were named a national monument by President Clinton during his final year in office, a long fight over protection of some of Earth's most majestic trees appeared to end. It didn't. Last month, the U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | Associated Press
President Clinton is considering setting aside as much as 400,000 acres of forests in California as a federal monument to permanently protect remaining groves of the state's giant sequoia trees, administration officials said Tuesday. Clinton asked Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to explore whether the trees ought to be protected under the 1906 Antiquities Act, as he did a month ago to ensure permanent protection over a vast stretch of land adjacent to the Grand Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 180 dead trees pose a danger to hikers along one of the southern Sierra Nevada's most popular trails and will be cut down, U.S. Forest Service officials said. The Trail of 100 Giants in Giant Sequoia National Monument leads visitors on a half-mile walk through a grove of ancient giant sequoia trees. None of the dead trees along the trail is a giant sequoia.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | United Press International
Firefighters beaten back by intense heat from flames feeding on tinder-dry hillsides regrouped Friday for another attempt to encircle a 3,000-acre brush and timber fire in California's Sequoia National Park. Fire crews set backfires in hopes of completing the containment line on the eastern side of the 5-day-old fire in the high country wilderness 45 miles southeast of Fresno, officials said. The firefighters were forced to retreat several hundred yards earlier in the face of intense flames.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Southern California Edison Co. will pay the federal government $1.8 million to settle a lawsuit seeking damages from a 2007 wildfire that burned parts of the Sequoia National Forest. The lawsuit alleged that negligence by the Rosemead electric utility caused the blaze. QUIZ: Do U.S. corporations pay too little in taxes? "Poorly maintained hardware on a power distribution line owned by Edison caused an electrical fault, and molten material fell to the ground below, igniting dry vegetation," said a statement issued by Benjamin B. Wagner, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of California in Sacramento.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
A coalition of environmental groups filed court papers Tuesday, seeking to save a federal act that protects giant sequoia trees. The coalition is seeking to join the U.S. government as defendants in a suit brought by logging interests, recreational groups and Tulare County. If the motion is granted, the coalition will move to dismiss the suit, said Michael Sherwood, an attorney with Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving a step closer to the creation of another national monument in California, federal officials recommended Friday that President Clinton set aside 355,000 acres of a Sierra Nevada national forest to protect extensive groves of ancient sequoia trees. Clinton, who recently established several new monuments in California and Arizona, is expected to act quickly to establish the monument.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dick Cheney, the Republican vice presidential nominee, said Thursday that a Bush administration would review President Clinton's designations of vast wilderness areas as national monuments to decide whether to rescind any of them. "Of course, it's not my decision to make," Cheney told local reporters in rural southern Oregon. "The president-elect will have to make those decisions. But certainly I expect we would review a lot of those decisions to see whether or not any action is appropriate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
State Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer filed a federal lawsuit Thursday to block a U.S. Forest Service plan to permit commercial logging in the Giant Sequoia National Monument. The suit, which follows a similar one filed in January by conservation groups, alleges that the Forest Service is violating protections granted in 2000 by President Clinton, when he established the 328,000-acre monument in the southern Sierra northeast of Bakersfield.
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