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SPORTS
January 15, 2007 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
When Luc Robitaille and Jimmy Carson broke into the NHL as Kings rookies 21 years ago, few would have predicted that Robitaille would be the one whose jersey would be retired this Saturday night in Staples Center and Carson would be the one flying in for the ceremony to honor his longtime friend. Robitaille, two years older than his teammate and a ninth-round pick in the 1984 draft, was considered a long shot for NHL stardom. Carson, the No. 2 pick in 1986, was said to be a sure bet.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Robin Williams, star of the sitcom “The Crazy Ones,” sold a house this year in the Hollywood Hills  for $869,000, The Times has confirmed. A brick walkway leads to the entry and a brick stoop. The tidy two-bedroom has a Roaring '20s ambience with an arched front door accented by painted bricks in a starburst pattern. Interior archways, hardwood floors, high ceilings and built-in bookcases continue the vibe indoors. The 1,318 square feet of living space includes a screening room, an updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances and 1.5 bathrooms.
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SPORTS
July 19, 2013 | By David Wharton
Miguel Angel Jimenez might have found the secret to dealing with stiff winds, dry greens and tough pin placements at the British Open. Don't worry. Jimenez neared the finish of Friday's play atop the leaderboard at 3-under. While other golfers have struggled at Muirfield this week, the Spaniard is obviously taking a different approach. After the first round, Keegan Bradley spotted his colleague on the driving range, obviously relaxing. On range after my round Miguel a Jimenez walked past me with aviator sunglasses, cigar and bottle of wine.
OPINION
April 14, 2014 | By Jonathan Turley
In the late 1960s, a charismatic vice president at Ford Motor Co. decided to bring out a low-priced car that could be produced for little money while bringing in huge profits. The executive's name was Lee Iacocca, and the Ford Pinto he championed became one of the most infamous models in U.S. automotive history. Why? Because to save money, Ford released a car that could explode in even low-speed rear-end collisions. I still teach the Pinto case to my law students as an example of how profits sometimes overwhelm principle.
NEWS
February 20, 1985 | JACK SMITH
There is a popular school of thought, sometimes called kismet, which holds that everything is preordained. Que sera sera. What will be will be. As a philosophy, it ranks with Monday-morning quarterbacking.
SPORTS
July 31, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
If Dodgers fans didn't care that Manny Ramirez cheated in 2009, they won't care that he tested positive in 2003. . . . Que sera sera. . . . On Thursday, when the New York Times reported that Ramirez and former Boston Red Sox teammate David Ortiz tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs six years ago, Bud Selig celebrated his 75th birthday. . . . His present, from anonymous sources leaking supposedly confidential information, was another black eye for baseball. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2001 | CRAIG TOMASHOFF, Craig Tomashoff is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles
It looks pretty much like a typical Monday morning at any office anywhere. There's a sign posted to let everyone know that flu shots will be available tomorrow afternoon. In the lunchroom, employees drift over to sign up for the "Monday Night Football" pool. Out in front, a few people have gathered for a quick smoke and a chat about plans for the upcoming holidays. However, there's just one difference between this setting and most offices around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996
In reference to a letter last Sunday regarding my observations on Elisabeth Shue's excellent performance as Sera in "Leaving Las Vegas": I know firsthand, working as an acting coach every day, how little physical attractiveness has to do with self-worth. My point was about Sera's inability to dig herself out of a potentially fatal lifestyle. Her lack of self was so deep, she was unable to see that her beauty might be a way out. LARRY MOSS Santa Monica
FOOD
February 3, 1994 | JONATHAN GOLD
One of the most intriguingly mixed neighborhoods in Los Angeles is that bit of Beverly Boulevard stretching west a few blocks from Vermont, where Koreatown and the Filipino neighborhood to the east crash headlong into the giant Central American community that stretches up into Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1996 | JAMES McCAFFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the late '70s and early '80s, gothic rock emerged from England as a popular underground genre. Bauhaus, the Sisters of Mercy and the Cure played live stateside to appreciative crowds, enjoyed crossover success on the fringe of the British new-wave movement, and then went away. Just as punk has been rediscovered by a new army of young fans, gothic rock is undergoing a similar resurrection with the runaway success of such newer bands as Nine Inch Nails and Filter.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
A 1970s-era office building in the Westlake neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles that houses a branch of the L.A. Superior Court has sold for $50 million to prominent local real estate investor Jamison Services Inc. Jamison, one of the largest office landlords in Southern California, bought the building at 600 S. Commonwealth Ave. from a family trust managed by Comerica Bank. The 19-story building overlooking Lafayette Park in the Westlake neighborhood was completed in 1971 to house the Los Angeles offices of CNA Financial Corp., a Chicago insurance firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown acted Friday to repeal a World War II-era law that requires the registration of subversive organizations conceived “for the purpose of undermining and eventually destroying the democratic form of government” in California and the United States. In all, Brown signed 12 bills Friday, including AB 1405, which repeals the Subversive Organization Registration Law enacted in 1941. During World War II, some political figures believed there were internal groups attempting to undermine the United States even as it fought wars against Japan and Germany.  No organization ever registered under the law, state officials said.
SPORTS
July 19, 2013 | By David Wharton
Miguel Angel Jimenez might have found the secret to dealing with stiff winds, dry greens and tough pin placements at the British Open. Don't worry. Jimenez neared the finish of Friday's play atop the leaderboard at 3-under. While other golfers have struggled at Muirfield this week, the Spaniard is obviously taking a different approach. After the first round, Keegan Bradley spotted his colleague on the driving range, obviously relaxing. On range after my round Miguel a Jimenez walked past me with aviator sunglasses, cigar and bottle of wine.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has devoted decades to giving meaning to the Constitution's promise of equality for all before the law. Now, as the court heads into the final two weeks of this year's term, the justices may be about to close one chapter of that long story even as they open a new one. The court is set to decide whether to pull back on 1960s-era remedies for racial discrimination that critics say have outlived their need. One case tests a race-based affirmative action policy at the University of Texas that gives an advantage to black and Latino students.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is fire everywhere in Olivier Assayas' scorching new coming-of-age drama "Something in the Air. " It is in the passions, in the politics and in the sex roiling through the filmmaker's vision of 1970s-era Paris. For this is a memoir of sorts of Assayas' youth - the forces that pulled at him and the choices that shaped who he would become. Coming off his acclaimed "Carlos," a six-hour opus on the Venezuelan revolutionary known as Carlos the Jackal, Assayas hasn't left those themes as much as gotten more intimate in exploring them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2013 | Tony Perry
A flock of birds flew away, as if the avians knew something big was coming. Misty geysers of water were sprayed into the air, to keep down the dust. And then a series of explosions broke the Saturday morning calm and, within seconds, the South Bay Power Plant, an admired and yet also hated fixture on the Chula Vista waterfront since the late 1950s, crumbled into history. Two hundred pounds of charges detonated 300 pounds of dynamite, and the 165-foot structure of concrete and metal folded inward on itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
"Early Edition" is a new series about foreseeing the future. Its own future on CBS rests in a time slot opposite two other series premiering tonight: the ABC comedy "Common Law" and the Fox comedy "Love and Marriage." All three of which argue persuasively for going out on Saturday nights. "Early Edition" asks what an ordinary guy would do if he knew the future a day in advance, then goes on to answer its own question unconvincingly in the premiere.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2009 | Valli Herman
Shielded from its Brentwood street by a shrubbery screen is Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 886, the Gould-LaFetra House. The three-story, glass-and-wood home, which received its designation from the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission, is the latest "sensitive restoration" project of film producer Michael LaFetra -- a sort of one-man architectural preservation society who has purchased and restored a dozen or so homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2013 | By Bradley Zint, Los Angeles Times
Plans are in the works at the 1940s-era Anchor Trailer Port in Costa Mesa to convert the residential park to condominiums. But as decisions and approvals make their way through administrative channels, some residents say they feel confused, cheated and adrift. Others know the change was inevitable but just want their fair share of moving costs and per diems. The tentative move-out date is Aug. 24. The developers say they hear residents' concerns and are being generous. City staff has chipped in more than 100 hours toward the task of helping them move.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Dustin Roasa, Special to the Los Angeles Times
- On a recent Saturday evening at the Cosmic Cafe here, young Thais with pixie haircuts and ornate shoulder tattoos chatted in groups, their faces illuminated by the soft glow of smartphones. Although the space was packed, the energy level lagged compared with Bubble Bar next door, which boomed with the latest hip-hop and techno tracks. But the crowd surged to its feet when the DJ began playing 1970s-era luk thung and mor lam , Thai musical genres closely associated with hardscrabble life in the country's poor, rural northeast.
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