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Serbia And Montenegro

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WORLD
June 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The Yugoslav parliament voted overwhelmingly for a plan to abolish the Balkan federation and replace it with a looser union between its two remaining members, Serbia and Montenegro. The move clears the way for experts to flesh out a new constitution from the blueprint. The West is keen to head off a Montenegrin drive for independence, which it fears would destabilize a region that saw a decade of bloodshed when the six republics that then made up Yugoslavia began to break apart in 1991.
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SPORTS
February 14, 2010 | By Chris Foster
Nikola Dragovic was too much to handle. He was older, and already competing with the best Serbia and Montenegro had to offer. So Nikola Vucevic, 12 years old and three years younger than his "godbrother," battled as best he could. His uncle's Belgium professional team was practicing for a Euro League game in Serbia, but the real competition was on the side court. This was the first time the two had met, even though their families were bound by basketball and friendship, and the outcome was predictable.
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WORLD
June 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States lifted its freeze on a $10-million aid package for Serbia and Montenegro, saying the Balkan country had shown better cooperation with the U.N. war crimes tribunal. The U.S. in January withheld the funds because of Serbia and Montenegro's failure to arrest and extradite several Serb suspects to the tribunal in The Hague. Last year, $16 million in U.S. aid was withheld for the same reason.
WORLD
February 9, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Serbian President Boris Tadic made a last-minute plea to world leaders Friday to avoid recognizing an independent Kosovo, insisting that though Serbia remains committed to full integration with Europe, "we cannot accept the dismemberment of our nation." With the Serbian province now widely expected to declare independence Feb.
WORLD
February 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Montenegro failed to elect a president for the second time in two months because turnout was below the 50% required by law, monitors said. The Center for Monitoring Elections said 47.1% of the electorate voted. Front-runner Filip Vujanovic won 81.7%. Montenegro is the smaller republic in Serbia and Montenegro, formerly Yugoslavia.
WORLD
October 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A senior U.S. diplomat warned Serbia and Montenegro that the Balkan country would "suffer the consequences" for its failure to arrest Bosnian war crimes suspects Ratko Mladic and Radovan Karadzic. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs R. Nicholas Burns said the nation would not achieve closer ties with NATO and the European Union if the two men were not sent to a war crimes tribunal.
WORLD
November 14, 2003 | From Reuters
Serbia and Montenegro President Svetozar Marovic offered a landmark apology to Bosnia on Thursday for the 1992-95 war in which 200,000 died, most of them Muslims vastly outgunned by Belgrade-backed Bosnian Serbs. He made the gesture eight years after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization stopped the fighting and imposed the Dayton peace accord, and three years after the countries -- previously parts of Yugoslavia, which has since been renamed Serbia and Montenegro -- normalized relations.
WORLD
February 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Hard-liner Vojislav Seselj, who came in second in Serbia's December presidential poll, left for the Netherlands today to hand himself over to a United Nations tribunal that on Feb. 14 indicted him on war crimes charges. Seselj is accused of "ethnic cleansing" and other atrocities in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina from 1991 to 1993. He was an ally of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, who has been on trial in The Hague for a year, charged with crimes against humanity and genocide.
WORLD
July 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
SERBIA-MONTENEGRO Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's paramilitary commander, his secret police chief and five others were convicted and sentenced for the 2000 murder of former Serbian President Ivan Stambolic. Former Cmdr. Milorad Lukovic was sentenced to the maximum 40 years for the murder and for an attempt to assassinate Vuk Draskovic, now Serbia and Montenegro's foreign minister. Radomir Rade Markovic, the former secret service chief, was given 15 years.
WORLD
October 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Kosovo's Serb minority largely boycotted general elections, dealing a blow to international efforts to bring multiethnic harmony to the province. The Albanian majority, however, eagerly cast ballots to elect representatives to a 120-seat assembly. The assembly will choose a president and a government that will have limited authority. Kosovo came under the rule of the United Nations and North Atlantic Treaty Organization at the end of a war in 1999.
WORLD
October 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Serbian voters have approved a new constitution reasserting Serbia's claim over breakaway Kosovo province, independent observers and Serbia's prime minister said Sunday. The Belgrade-based Center for Free Elections and Democracy said its sample count after polls closed in the two-day vote indicated that 96% of those who participated in the referendum supported the draft charter. About 53.3% of the country's 6.
WORLD
July 25, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of Serbia and Kosovo reluctantly met face to face Monday for the first time since NATO bombs drove Serbian forces out of the Albanian majority province in 1999. A United Nations special envoy called the meeting, in the officially neutral city of Vienna, to make progress on the Gordian knot of Kosovo's future status: The province's ethnic majority wants full independence and Serbia opposes division.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Andres D'Alessandro
Traffic was light, and Argentines gripped their coffee cups, mumbled nervously and nibbled at croissants while focusing on television sets. As play began across the Atlantic, business halted at cafes and offices. All eyes turned toward the ubiquitous screens. With every Argentine goal, anxiety eased, until Friday's 6-0 thrashing of Serbia and Montenegro unleashed an impromptu festival.
WORLD
May 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Masked police backed by helicopters searched a western Serbian town as part of a hunt for U.N. war crimes fugitive Ratko Mladic, local media reported. The Beta news agency reported that police arrested two people in a three-hour search of Valjevo, about 50 miles southwest of Belgrade.
WORLD
May 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A European Union deadline for Serbia to surrender war crimes fugitive Ratko Mladic expired with no sign of the former army commander. Officials pledged to keep hunting Mladic, who was indicted by a U.N. court in the 1995 slaughter of as many as 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica. If it does not hand over Mladic, Serbia's pre-membership talks with the EU may be suspended.
WORLD
April 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Danube reached record levels in Romania, Serbia and Bulgaria, flooding fertile farmland as authorities in southeastern Europe considered ordering evacuations. More than 3,000 police, military and civilian workers monitored dams in Romania, with dozens of communities ready to evacuate after weeks of spring runoff combined with heavy rain. Rivers were expected to rise higher, and hundreds of people fled the western Romanian village of Gataia, flooded by the Barzava River, officials said.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Andres D'Alessandro
Traffic was light, and Argentines gripped their coffee cups, mumbled nervously and nibbled at croissants while focusing on television sets. As play began across the Atlantic, business halted at cafes and offices. All eyes turned toward the ubiquitous screens. With every Argentine goal, anxiety eased, until Friday's 6-0 thrashing of Serbia and Montenegro unleashed an impromptu festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993
The last decade of the 20th Century is witnessing an upsurge of economic warfare passing under the euphemism of "sanctions." With a greater and more diversified interdependence within the world community, this kind of war has become more effective and deadlier than ever before. Since the only victims of sanctions are civilians, the omnipotent gods of the public opinion, the media, are used to justify the reasons and obscure the real aim, which is to destroy the enemy. The glaring example of this "new world order" policy are the U.N. sanctions implemented against Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)
WORLD
March 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Kosovo Prime Minister Bajram Kosumi resigned, days after the start of talks on whether the province will gain full independence or remain part of Serbia. His nominated replacement, Lt. Gen. Agim Ceku, heads the civil emergency organization that ethnic Albanians view as the core of their future army. Ceku, 44, sided with Croatia's army in the fight against Serbs during the breakup of Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. Serbian officials have accused him of committing war crimes against civilians.
WORLD
February 22, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin and Zoran Cirjakovic, Special to The Times
Rumors swirled late Tuesday that fugitive Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic had been captured and was being transferred to an international court in the Netherlands to be tried for alleged war crimes. However, Serbian officials quickly denied the reports, and a spokesman for the court in The Hague said the panel had no information that an arrest had been made.
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