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Serbia And Montenegro

WORLD
May 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The suspected mastermind of the 2003 assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic gave himself up to Serbian police, said Miroslav Milosevic, national security chief. Former Red Berets special police commander Milorad "Legija" Lukovic, linked to a Belgrade mafia, gave himself up outside his house in a Belgrade suburb.
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WORLD
May 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities released three Jordanian police officers detained after a Kosovo prison shootout that killed three American corrections officers and an assailant, a U.N. official said. Officials are investigating whether the officers helped their commander, Sgt. Maj. Ahmed Mustafa Ibrahim Ali, as he opened fire on the Americans on April 17. But they could be detained without formal charges for only 15 days under Kosovo law.
WORLD
April 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An international prosecutor found no evidence linking Serbs to the drowning of three ethnic Albanian children that touched off ethnic violence in the province of Kosovo in March, a U.N. spokesman said. Prosecutor Peter Tinsley concluded that "no suspects have been identified" in the deaths in Cabra, a village about 25 miles north of the province's capital, Pristina, the spokesman said. A survivor had said the victims jumped into the river to escape Serb youths chasing them.
WORLD
April 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell suspended about $26 million in assistance to Serbia and Montenegro on Wednesday for its refusal to hand over suspects to the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague. The most prominent suspect still at large is former Bosnian Serb army commander Gen. Ratko Mladic. He was accused by the U.N. court of genocide in the deaths of about 7,000 men and boys in the Bosnian Muslim enclave of Srebrenica in July 1995.
WORLD
March 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A landmark war crimes trial opened at Belgrade's Special Court for six Serbs accused of slaughtering 192 Croatian prisoners in the Balkan conflicts. The trial over the killings in Vukovar, Croatia, comes under a new prime minister who opposes the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague as biased against Serbs. Serbia's judiciary hopes that if the trial meets international standards, additional cases can be tried at home rather than at the U.N. tribunal.
WORLD
February 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Serbia's prime minister-designate said sending suspects to the U.N. war crimes tribunal would not be his top priority, defying U.S. threats to cut aid to the Balkan republic. Vojislav Kostunica said Serbia has more important issues to deal with -- like simmering social tensions and a ruined economy. "This country is not a simple deliverer of human goods to The Hague tribunal," he said. His comments are likely to anger the U.S.
WORLD
February 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Vojislav Kostunica, the former Yugoslav president who assumed power after helping to oust Slobodan Milosevic, became Serbia's prime minister-designate after turning to the latter's party for support. The conservative leader is expected to head a minority government backed by Milosevic's Socialist Party of Serbia.
WORLD
December 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
The trial of the suspected assassins of Serbia's prime minister descended into turmoil Wednesday when the accused triggerman refused to enter a plea and defense attorneys walked out of the courtroom. Zvezdan Jovanovic, the former commander of an elite Serbian police unit who is charged with firing the sniper shot that killed Zoran Djindjic on March 12, said he had been framed by pro-Western authorities. "I have been exposed to tremendous pressure by these authorities," said Jovanovic, 38.
WORLD
November 14, 2003 | From Reuters
Serbia and Montenegro President Svetozar Marovic offered a landmark apology to Bosnia on Thursday for the 1992-95 war in which 200,000 died, most of them Muslims vastly outgunned by Belgrade-backed Bosnian Serbs. He made the gesture eight years after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization stopped the fighting and imposed the Dayton peace accord, and three years after the countries -- previously parts of Yugoslavia, which has since been renamed Serbia and Montenegro -- normalized relations.
WORLD
August 22, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Serbian prosecutors charged 44 people, including the former commander of a notoriously brutal police unit, in the assassination of Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic. Djindjic, known for his pro-Western stance, was gunned down March 12 as he stepped from his car in front of government headquarters in Belgrade. Prime suspect Milorad Lukovic and 15 others were charged with murdering Djindjic, prosecutors said in a statement. Lukovic is a former commander of the Red Berets.
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