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April 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant escalation of tensions between the two Balkan neighbors, Albania on Tuesday charged that Yugoslav troops had violated its territory, shelling and burning homes in a remote border village before withdrawing. Yugoslav officials denied the report, but international peace monitors in the border area said Yugoslav troops had entered the village of Kamenica and set part of it on fire before withdrawing after 1 1/2 hours.
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NEWS
September 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Forensic experts in Bosnia said they have found the remains of about 50 bodies at a site where a local Serb alleged that Muslims had been killed by Serbian forces in 1992. Amor Masovic, the head of the Muslim commission for missing persons, said the remains were found at the Ivan Polje meadow. The site, five miles from the eastern town of Sokolac, has served as a local dump since Bosnia's 1992-95 war.
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NEWS
November 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
William Walker, the U.S. official in charge of monitoring a Serbian troop withdrawal from Kosovo, arrived in the troubled province and said his mission was "the last, best chance" for peace. Walker added that resolution of the conflict is a long way off, and NATO officials also voiced concern about continuing clashes.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN and PAUL RICHTER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Yugoslav and Western generals signed a military agreement Wednesday to end NATO's 78-day air war against Yugoslavia, provided that the Balkan nation's armed forces begin a "demonstrable" withdrawal from Kosovo by this afternoon and complete the pullout in 11 days. The agreement calls for an immediate cease-fire in Kosovo and provides for a pause in NATO's bombing campaign beginning perhaps as early as today if the Yugoslav forces start removing troops and equipment.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a candid acknowledgment that efforts to preserve a multiethnic Bosnian capital are failing miserably, the NATO commander in the war-ravaged nation agreed Saturday to allow Bosnian Serb military vehicles to help evacuate residents from Serb-populated Sarajevo suburbs. The trucks, which will probably be driven by unarmed soldiers in civilian clothing, are expected to arrive in this northern suburb Monday.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fighting intensified around the Croatian cities of Dubrovnik and Vukovar despite a supposed cease-fire in the war pitting Croatian forces against the Serbian-dominated army and Serbian rebels. Vukovar was under fire from across the Danube River in Serbia and from the south, Zagreb defense officials said. At least 2,000 children are reportedly among the townspeople trapped there. The defense officials also said the army was advancing toward the medieval city of Dubrovnik.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sagging morale, indiscipline and drunkenness have seriously set back Serbian guerrilla attempts to divide Sarajevo and conquer most of Bosnia-Herzegovina, military experts have concluded. Coupled with the reopening of Sarajevo airport, which restores a lifeline to the city's 300,000 starving holdouts, the rampant unruliness in Serbian ranks could lead to their eventual defeat, according to those monitoring the bloody Bosnian war.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Accusing Serbian forces of violating the new Bosnian "no fly" zone, the Bush Administration said Tuesday it has begun to sound out members of the U.N. Security Council on ways to enforce the order intended to ground all military aircraft in the bloody ethnic war. "The Security Council is bound to consider further actions in the case of violations," State Department spokesman Joe Snyder said. The council approved a watered-down resolution Friday banning warplanes from the skies over Bosnia.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic on Sunday cut the television link used by his renegade Bosnian Serb proxies to stoke war fever, strengthening his position in a Serb-versus-Serb power struggle in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The relay of broadcasts from Pale, the Bosnian Serb stronghold 10 miles east of Sarajevo, was stopped a day after rebel leader Radovan Karadzic indirectly criticized Milosevic in interviews seen by Bosnian Serb viewers. "The TV connection was cut today," U.N.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comparing the Yugoslav ethnic horror to Nazi genocide, Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger demanded Wednesday that those responsible for the atrocities--including Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic--be brought to trial for war crimes. This was the first time that any world leader in so prominent a public forum had named Serbian officials and linked them with possible prosecution.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic upped the pressure on Montenegro's reformist government Thursday with a mass rally demanding that the Yugoslav republic's police submit to army control. The issue is critical for the survival of the pro-Western administration of democratically elected Montenegrin President Milo Djukanovic, who has tried to keep Montenegro as uninvolved as possible in the fight between NATO and Milosevic.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant escalation of tensions between the two Balkan neighbors, Albania on Tuesday charged that Yugoslav troops had violated its territory, shelling and burning homes in a remote border village before withdrawing. Yugoslav officials denied the report, but international peace monitors in the border area said Yugoslav troops had entered the village of Kamenica and set part of it on fire before withdrawing after 1 1/2 hours.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent radio stations and civilian authorities, fighting a risky battle to preserve democratic freedoms in Montenegro, on Saturday rejected army demands that local rebroadcasting of foreign news programs be halted. "We are not going to change a thing," declared Tanja Knezevic, editor in chief of Montena Radio, one of the broadcast outlets targeted in the attempted Yugoslav army crackdown. "The intention of the army is to provoke the government. They're doing it through us."
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
William Walker, the U.S. official in charge of monitoring a Serbian troop withdrawal from Kosovo, arrived in the troubled province and said his mission was "the last, best chance" for peace. Walker added that resolution of the conflict is a long way off, and NATO officials also voiced concern about continuing clashes.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic came under new pressure Monday with the purported rebellion of an elite army unit, while leaders of anti-government street demonstrations planned their largest rally yet for New Year's Eve. On the 43rd consecutive day of protest against alleged election fraud, thousands of students and other demonstrators paraded over ice-coated streets through police gantlets and heard from a young activist released from jail after 25 days.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a candid acknowledgment that efforts to preserve a multiethnic Bosnian capital are failing miserably, the NATO commander in the war-ravaged nation agreed Saturday to allow Bosnian Serb military vehicles to help evacuate residents from Serb-populated Sarajevo suburbs. The trucks, which will probably be driven by unarmed soldiers in civilian clothing, are expected to arrive in this northern suburb Monday.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Forensic experts in Bosnia said they have found the remains of about 50 bodies at a site where a local Serb alleged that Muslims had been killed by Serbian forces in 1992. Amor Masovic, the head of the Muslim commission for missing persons, said the remains were found at the Ivan Polje meadow. The site, five miles from the eastern town of Sokolac, has served as a local dump since Bosnia's 1992-95 war.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic came under new pressure Monday with the purported rebellion of an elite army unit, while leaders of anti-government street demonstrations planned their largest rally yet for New Year's Eve. On the 43rd consecutive day of protest against alleged election fraud, thousands of students and other demonstrators paraded over ice-coated streets through police gantlets and heard from a young activist released from jail after 25 days.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic on Sunday cut the television link used by his renegade Bosnian Serb proxies to stoke war fever, strengthening his position in a Serb-versus-Serb power struggle in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The relay of broadcasts from Pale, the Bosnian Serb stronghold 10 miles east of Sarajevo, was stopped a day after rebel leader Radovan Karadzic indirectly criticized Milosevic in interviews seen by Bosnian Serb viewers. "The TV connection was cut today," U.N.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a key NATO meeting on air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbian forces claimed Sunday to be pulling back from heights above Sarajevo, but a U.N. spokesman said their maneuvers might be mere "stage management." Bosnia's president, Alija Izetbegovic, claimed that the Serbs have been bluffing all along about a withdrawal. He called for urgent military action by the West to deter the Serbs' purported intent to seek all-out victory in Bosnia's civil war.
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