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February 28, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization announced Tuesday that it will soon begin a "phased and conditioned" reduction of a volatile buffer zone between Serbia proper and its separatist province, Kosovo. NATO Secretary-General George Robertson made the announcement after talks between Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and 18 European foreign ministers. Robertson called the plan to scale back the 3-mile-deep zone a first step toward a lasting peace.
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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization announced Tuesday that it will soon begin a "phased and conditioned" reduction of a volatile buffer zone between Serbia proper and its separatist province, Kosovo. NATO Secretary-General George Robertson made the announcement after talks between Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and 18 European foreign ministers. Robertson called the plan to scale back the 3-mile-deep zone a first step toward a lasting peace.
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WORLD
November 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Serbia's president on Thursday formally proposed dividing Kosovo between its independence-seeking Albanian majority and a Serb minority as the chief U.N. mediator met with government officials. Martti Ahtisaari, who was appointed this month by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and is on his initial fact-finding mission in the Balkans, said the troubled province's final status would ultimately be decided by the Security Council after his report.
OPINION
January 2, 2004
President Bush declared in November that the United States was leading a "global democratic revolution." But what happens when radicals hijack democracy for their own anti-democratic ends? Serbia's election last Sunday, in which nationalists garnered the biggest share of the vote, offers a fresh reminder that it's easier to champion than to create viable democratic societies. Serbia is not on the verge of a return to genocidal wars against Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991
Your editorial "How to Arrest Madness" (Oct. 26) suggests the breakup of Yugoslavia along internal republic borders and forming of a loose confederation as the primary goal of any future settlement. It is impossible to justify your support for those arbitrarily drawn, democratically unverified and internationally unrecognized internal boundaries proposed by a group of communists during World War II. According to the cherished right of self-determination, stated in the Yugoslav constitution, all six constituent Yugoslav peoples (not republics)
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks on a proposed cease-fire between Yugoslav forces and ethnic Albanian guerrillas in southern Serbia's Presevo Valley broke off with no apparent progress Saturday. The difficulties delayed today's plans for Yugoslav troops to begin entering part of a buffer zone between Kosovo and Serbia proper adjacent to the Macedonian border, Yugoslav authorities said.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and a senior Russian diplomat will face off in London on Monday in a tense post-Cold War confrontation over escalating violence in Kosovo, a restive province of Serbia where ethnic Albanian rebels are battling Serbian police.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a day when hopes soured for the release of three American soldiers imprisoned in Yugoslavia, President Clinton held firmly Thursday to his plan not to send combat troops into a ground war in Kosovo. In the Balkans, sad and confused accounts of the plight of tens of thousands of refugees--as well as recriminations among government officials--emerged from the rugged territory where Kosovo, the southernmost province of the Yugoslav republic of Serbia, borders Macedonia.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav leadership collapsed Friday after what amounted to a Serbian-led coup d'etat , leaving the crisis-torn country without a president or a forum to negotiate escape from a looming civil war. The power vacuum left open the possibility of a military takeover, moves by Croatia and Slovenia to secede, and uncontrollable outbreaks of violence between armed Serbs and Croats.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Slovenia's declaration of sovereignty and independence from Yugoslavia, Serbs respond unemotionally, "Bon voyage." But if Croatia decides to leave the crumbling federation, the remaining republics will want to exact a price: rich stretches of Croatian coastline. In the province of Kosovo, which Serbia has already stripped of political autonomy, troops are poised for an insurrection, and Serbian nationalists are pressing for expulsion of the Albanian majority.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Security Council on Monday toughened its embargo by authorizing a naval blockade against Serbia. The action came amid reports that scores of trucks and boats are still violating U.N. sanctions by crossing into Serbia and Montenegro with gasoline and other badly needed supplies. The 15-member council voted 13 to 0, with 2 abstentions, for the blockade of the Adriatic Sea and the Danube River. Under the resolution, vessels suspected of carrying contraband may be stopped and searched.
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