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Serbia Currency

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NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slovenia accused Serbia of secretly ordering the printing of $1.4 billion in new money to pay its debts, threatening a new bout of inflation and acceleration of Yugoslavia's impending breakup. Slovenian Prime Minister Lojze Peterle said Serbia's unilateral action is "robbing" the other republics and warned that his government might issue a separate currency before the end of the month to protect Slovenes from the consequences he expects to be disastrous.
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NEWS
January 6, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed guards keep order as desperate students, housewives and pensioners stand in line all night to be told in the morning when to come back. At the appointed time, a day or two later, each "customer" returns for another all-day vigil, braving hours on the frosty streets of Belgrade to wait with thousands of others to enter Dafiment Bank.
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NEWS
January 6, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed guards keep order as desperate students, housewives and pensioners stand in line all night to be told in the morning when to come back. At the appointed time, a day or two later, each "customer" returns for another all-day vigil, braving hours on the frosty streets of Belgrade to wait with thousands of others to enter Dafiment Bank.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slovenia accused Serbia of secretly ordering the printing of $1.4 billion in new money to pay its debts, threatening a new bout of inflation and acceleration of Yugoslavia's impending breakup. Slovenian Prime Minister Lojze Peterle said Serbia's unilateral action is "robbing" the other republics and warned that his government might issue a separate currency before the end of the month to protect Slovenes from the consequences he expects to be disastrous.
WORLD
February 5, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Erasing Yugoslavia from the map of Europe, lawmakers all but dissolved the troubled Balkan federation Tuesday and gave birth to a new country with a new name: Serbia and Montenegro. Under a European Union-brokered accord approved by the Yugoslav parliament, the two republics will stick together in a loose union that gives each greater autonomy. They will remain tied only by a small joint administration in charge of defense, foreign affairs and general economic planning.
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