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NEWS
October 13, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular uprising that brought down Slobodan Milosevic also overturned the complex shell game he used to keep the economy just a few tricks ahead of collapse. Allies of Yugoslavia's new president, Vojislav Kostunica, are frantically trying to piece things back together. If they fail, they acknowledge, the discontent that brought Kostunica to power could quickly turn against them.
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NEWS
October 13, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular uprising that brought down Slobodan Milosevic also overturned the complex shell game he used to keep the economy just a few tricks ahead of collapse. Allies of Yugoslavia's new president, Vojislav Kostunica, are frantically trying to piece things back together. If they fail, they acknowledge, the discontent that brought Kostunica to power could quickly turn against them.
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NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shunned by the world, abandoned by former allies and unable to control the violence consuming his country, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appears in deep political trouble. United Nations sanctions imposed a week ago have had little visible effect on an economy already ravaged by war, but they have struck a collapsing blow to the Serbian psyche, especially in prosperous and cosmopolitan Belgrade. "It's embarrassing for us to have to wait in line for gasoline.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping up pressure on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to end violence in Serbia's Kosovo province, the United States and Western Europe's four leading nations Saturday slapped new sanctions on the Belgrade government while Washington deployed one of its most valued trouble-shooters.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of the Serbian capital are deceptive these days. The central market bursts with fruits and vegetables. Nightclubs and sporting events are jammed, and gasoline--sold in plastic jugs almost anywhere along the highway--is plentiful. But step into Dusan Andric's appliance store and see what many economists regard as the real Belgrade. The quiet downtown shop may explain better than any diplomat why Serbs are talking about making peace in Geneva after so many years of fomenting war.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a symbolic farewell to an age of prosperity scuttled by civil war, black marketeers line up by the hundreds along Vojvoda Stepe Embankment to flag down hard-currency customers by waving thick wads of dinars. The jobless money traders, victims of the Yugoslav conflict that has destroyed half a century of development, are standard-bearers in the Balkans' collective march backward to poverty, lawlessness and crude barter.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping up pressure on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to end violence in Serbia's Kosovo province, the United States and Western Europe's four leading nations Saturday slapped new sanctions on the Belgrade government while Washington deployed one of its most valued trouble-shooters.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all Western logic, Tomislav Drinjakovic should be furious with the Serbian leadership. There is no demand for his custom-made wedding clothes because the Belgrade regime has sent so many young men away to war. Foreign economic sanctions bar the import of silks and satins that are integral to the Belgrade tailor's trade. His income is one-tenth what it was a year ago, and inflation has hit a 100,000% annual rate, putting even basics beyond his family's reach.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Times special correspondent Laura Silber contributed to this report
When the wheels of a delivery van screeched to a halt on the Avenue of Serbian Heroes, droopy eyes blinked open and hearts began to race in the stuffy, tranquilized offices of Belgrade's Economics Institute. Mail clerks and lettered intellectuals alike dropped what they were doing to rush out onto the sidewalk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2000
Armed with a clear victory in the Sept. 24 elections, the opposition to Slobodan Milosevic's rule in Yugoslavia vows to stage a peaceful but determined revolt for as long as it takes to drive the Serbian strongman from office. Western governments have thrown their weight behind Vojislav Kostunica, leader of the opposition coalition, but they can go only so far. Milosevic is already raising a nationalistic alarm, declaring there is a threat of foreign occupation.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of the Serbian capital are deceptive these days. The central market bursts with fruits and vegetables. Nightclubs and sporting events are jammed, and gasoline--sold in plastic jugs almost anywhere along the highway--is plentiful. But step into Dusan Andric's appliance store and see what many economists regard as the real Belgrade. The quiet downtown shop may explain better than any diplomat why Serbs are talking about making peace in Geneva after so many years of fomenting war.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Times special correspondent Laura Silber contributed to this report
When the wheels of a delivery van screeched to a halt on the Avenue of Serbian Heroes, droopy eyes blinked open and hearts began to race in the stuffy, tranquilized offices of Belgrade's Economics Institute. Mail clerks and lettered intellectuals alike dropped what they were doing to rush out onto the sidewalk.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shunned by the world, abandoned by former allies and unable to control the violence consuming his country, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appears in deep political trouble. United Nations sanctions imposed a week ago have had little visible effect on an economy already ravaged by war, but they have struck a collapsing blow to the Serbian psyche, especially in prosperous and cosmopolitan Belgrade. "It's embarrassing for us to have to wait in line for gasoline.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all Western logic, Tomislav Drinjakovic should be furious with the Serbian leadership. There is no demand for his custom-made wedding clothes because the Belgrade regime has sent so many young men away to war. Foreign economic sanctions bar the import of silks and satins that are integral to the Belgrade tailor's trade. His income is one-tenth what it was a year ago, and inflation has hit a 100,000% annual rate, putting even basics beyond his family's reach.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a symbolic farewell to an age of prosperity scuttled by civil war, black marketeers line up by the hundreds along Vojvoda Stepe Embankment to flag down hard-currency customers by waving thick wads of dinars. The jobless money traders, victims of the Yugoslav conflict that has destroyed half a century of development, are standard-bearers in the Balkans' collective march backward to poverty, lawlessness and crude barter.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Serbs and Croats agreed on Wednesday to establish low-level diplomatic relations as another round of peace talks among Bosnia-Herzegovina's three warring parties ended without a settlement. Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic blamed Bosnia's Muslims for "blocking peace" and praised the accord with Zagreb as "significant progress."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
So, is there serious evidence of a Serbian campaign of genocide in Kosovo? It's an important issue because the NATO powers, fortified by a chorus from the liberal intelligentsia, flourished the charge of genocide as justification for bombing that destroyed much of Serbia's economy and killed about 2,000 civilians. Whatever horrors they may have been planning, the Serbs were not engaged in genocidal activities in Kosovo before the bombing began.
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