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Serbia Elections

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December 23, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Milutinovic, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's handpicked candidate, was declared the winner Monday of a fraud-marred election for the presidency of Serbia. Opponents immediately cried foul. But this is a fraud international officials are not likely to protest too vociferously. The reason: Milutinovic's rival was an unpredictable ultranationalist whom the West refuses to recognize. Weary Serbs went to the polls Sunday for the fourth time in 2 1/2 months to elect a president.
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WORLD
December 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
For the second time this fall, Serbia failed to elect a president as too few voters showed up Sunday to cast ballots, exit polls showed. The state electoral commission said turnout was about 45% of the 6.5 million eligible voters, below the required 50% and slightly less than when the vote failed in October. The failed vote heralds a continued period of uncertainty and power battles among the politicians who ousted Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic.
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NEWS
December 22, 1997 | Associated Press
In a vote marred by charges of fraud, a protege of Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic appeared headed for victory Sunday in Serbia's presidential elections. But it was unclear if the turnout was high enough for a valid vote. It was the fourth time in three months that Serbs tried to elect a successor to Milosevic, now the president of Yugoslavia, which is composed of Serbia and Montenegro. The clash again pitted his ally, Socialist Milan Milutinovic, against ultranationalist Vojislav Seselj.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's family was doubly humiliated in Serbia's weekend election, with support for the neo-Communist party of his wife, Mirjana Markovic, crashing even more than for his own Socialists. Based on returns from more than half the polling stations, Markovic's Yugoslav Left, or JUL, won the support of just 0.37% of voters, far below the 5% it had needed to stay in the Serbian parliament, the electoral commission said Sunday.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic Albanians here in the southern Serbian province of Kosovo will hold underground elections today amid calls for a boycott, the threat of violence and a deepening debate over whether independence for the region can be achieved peacefully. The vote is for president and parliament of the self-styled "Republic of Kosovo."
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television moderator had to shout to be heard over his quarreling guests--representatives of Serbia's political parties--as he tried to end the program. "This has been a discussion on national reconciliation!" he yelled to his broadcast audience. "Thank you for joining us!" As a new political season heats up in Serbia, opposition forces are at each other's throats.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has promised to ease a media crackdown and ensure fair treatment for rivals in September's presidential and parliamentary elections in Serbia, but several opposition parties said they will boycott the vote. And despite the assurance on the media, the official Tanjug news agency reported the closure of three more radio and television stations in Serbia, which with tiny Montenegro makes up Yugoslavia.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It boils down to a contest between a nationalist zealot who has sparked Europe's deadliest war in half a century and a gregarious U.S. millionaire who promises peace and reconciliation with the West. Still, Sunday's election for Serbian president will be close. The fate of millions hangs on the outcome of this imperfect, unpredictable vote, as the Balkan war that has already killed tens of thousands threatens now to spread south.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move befitting his reputation as a cunning political tactician, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appears to have hit on a formula for staying in power by turning voter apathy and confusion to his advantage. Milosevic has been under pressure from Yugoslav Prime Minister Milan Panic to call early elections and to allow the Serbian people to rethink their support for the regime that has led them to ruin.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic Albanians here in the southern Serbian province of Kosovo will hold underground elections today amid calls for a boycott, the threat of violence and a deepening debate over whether independence for the region can be achieved peacefully. The vote is for president and parliament of the self-styled "Republic of Kosovo."
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Milutinovic, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's handpicked candidate, was declared the winner Monday of a fraud-marred election for the presidency of Serbia. Opponents immediately cried foul. But this is a fraud international officials are not likely to protest too vociferously. The reason: Milutinovic's rival was an unpredictable ultranationalist whom the West refuses to recognize. Weary Serbs went to the polls Sunday for the fourth time in 2 1/2 months to elect a president.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | Associated Press
In a vote marred by charges of fraud, a protege of Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic appeared headed for victory Sunday in Serbia's presidential elections. But it was unclear if the turnout was high enough for a valid vote. It was the fourth time in three months that Serbs tried to elect a successor to Milosevic, now the president of Yugoslavia, which is composed of Serbia and Montenegro. The clash again pitted his ally, Socialist Milan Milutinovic, against ultranationalist Vojislav Seselj.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party claimed victory early today in Serbian elections, a vote many of his opponents boycotted because they said it was rigged. "It is obvious that our party has a substantial lead in both the presidential and parliamentary elections," party spokesman Ivica Dacic said. Preliminary results were expected this afternoon. Milosevic, who controls the state media, was expected from the beginning to see his party triumph in Sunday's vote.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has promised to ease a media crackdown and ensure fair treatment for rivals in September's presidential and parliamentary elections in Serbia, but several opposition parties said they will boycott the vote. And despite the assurance on the media, the official Tanjug news agency reported the closure of three more radio and television stations in Serbia, which with tiny Montenegro makes up Yugoslavia.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic isn't even on the ballot for Sunday's election, yet any of the possible outcomes of the parliamentary balloting will--sooner or later--bestow victory on the Balkan strongman. While Milosevic's five-year rule has seen Serbia fall from relative prosperity to utter ruin, he is on the verge of fulfilling a long-held nationalist dream of uniting the widely dispersed Serbs in a state expanded by brute force and brilliant maneuvering.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | Times Wire Services
Serbians cast ballots Sunday in a referendum called by the republic's ruling Communists, who are attempting to retain power by exploiting rising Serbian anger over ethnic Albanian separatism in Kosovo province. The referendum asks voters in Serbia, the largest of Yugoslavia's six republics, to approve a Communist political program that calls for the enactment of a new constitution before promised multi-party elections.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television moderator had to shout to be heard over his quarreling guests--representatives of Serbia's political parties--as he tried to end the program. "This has been a discussion on national reconciliation!" he yelled to his broadcast audience. "Thank you for joining us!" As a new political season heats up in Serbia, opposition forces are at each other's throats.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local elections won by opponents of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic were officially recognized Tuesday by the Serbian parliament, virtually securing opposition rule in Belgrade and 13 other disputed cities. "Get ready for a huge party," said Zarko Korac, an opposition member of parliament. "There will soon be a couple hundred thousand people celebrating in the streets of Belgrade."
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