Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSerbia Government Officials
IN THE NEWS

Serbia Government Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political turmoil consumed Yugoslavia on Friday when federal President Borisav Jovic resigned amid rumblings of civil war, and an ominous military statement raised fears of a coup d'etat. Prime Minister Ante Markovic was closeted with federal government ministers early today in an effort to stave off an explosion of ethnic hostilities that have been building among Yugoslavia's many nationalities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | LAURA SILBER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Encouraged by their recent electoral triumph, ultranationalist Serbian radicals voted Tuesday to oust Milan Panic from the office of federal prime minister. The no-confidence motion against the moderate Panic easily passed both houses of the federal Parliament, spurred on by the wave of extremism that has washed over the remains of Yugoslavia since a Dec. 20 election defeated proponents of peace and reform.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bare nail and the faded shadow of a forgotten picture are all that decorate the wall over Miroslav Martic's desk. After two months on the job as deputy mayor, he said, there has been no time to settle into his City Hall office. "Everything here is still just as I found it," he explained, enjoying for a moment the comfort of a chair. "My day begins at 7 a.m. and ends between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. I always knew there were problems in this city, but that they were so big--I couldn't even guess."
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Opposition leaders took new steps Sunday to coordinate forces against Serbia's president, forming a coalition to organize 30 towns and villages they already govern. About 100,000 protesters marched through Belgrade, capital of both Serbia and the rump Yugoslavia, shortly after the opposition announced the formation of the Union of Free Cities and Municipalities of Serbia.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic suffered a serious blow to his already waning power and prestige Friday when Yugoslav President Dobrica Cosic, the ideological godfather of Serbs, called on him to resign for the good of the nation.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move befitting his reputation as a cunning political tactician, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appears to have hit on a formula for staying in power by turning voter apathy and confusion to his advantage. Milosevic has been under pressure from Yugoslav Prime Minister Milan Panic to call early elections and to allow the Serbian people to rethink their support for the regime that has led them to ruin.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina begins to spiral out of control, the man whom most in the international community blame for starting it all has been silent. Instead, Slobodan Milosevic, the president of Serbia who inspired and then publicly abandoned Serbian separatists in Bosnia and Croatia, has sent out signals showing he very much wants to toe the globally approved line.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Struggling for his political survival, Bosnian Serb leader and indicted war criminal Radovan Karadzic used a session of his self-declared parliament Sunday to add hard-liners to his fading government and to challenge the new Bosnian peace accord.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the rally here ended, the workers carefully took down the posters of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, folding the pieces of tape so as not to spoil the edges. After all, the posters, as well as the banners and the red, white and blue Serbian flags, would be reused at the next such event in the next town.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Opposition leaders took new steps Sunday to coordinate forces against Serbia's president, forming a coalition to organize 30 towns and villages they already govern. About 100,000 protesters marched through Belgrade, capital of both Serbia and the rump Yugoslavia, shortly after the opposition announced the formation of the Union of Free Cities and Municipalities of Serbia.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Struggling for his political survival, Bosnian Serb leader and indicted war criminal Radovan Karadzic used a session of his self-declared parliament Sunday to add hard-liners to his fading government and to challenge the new Bosnian peace accord.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a mystery, Izeta Bajramovic says, how the awkward kid with the unruly head of hair, who used to come around Bajramovic's corner sweet shop for free chunks of baklava, grew up to become international pariah Radovan Karadzic. "He was skinny, hairy and shy, very, very shy," she recalls. "I used to feel sorry for him. He was provincial, a typical peasant lost in the big city."
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina begins to spiral out of control, the man whom most in the international community blame for starting it all has been silent. Instead, Slobodan Milosevic, the president of Serbia who inspired and then publicly abandoned Serbian separatists in Bosnia and Croatia, has sent out signals showing he very much wants to toe the globally approved line.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his recent refusal to become part of a U.S.-backed strategy to help end the Balkans conflict, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic may in principle still be eager to cooperate with the West, according to diplomats and political analysts here.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | From Associated Press
The leader of Bosnia's Serbs said Tuesday that he will remain at peace talks and that an earlier report that he would withdraw was the result of a misunderstanding. Radovan Karadzic told a news conference that he is committed to a political settlement in Bosnia-Herzegovina and had been making progress toward peace. Earlier, Britain's Lord Owen, the mediator for the European Community, had told reporters that Karadzic was leaving.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riding high on a wave of nationalism, incumbent Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic and other former Communists appeared headed for victory Sunday in elections that may have been the last chance to salvage a united Yugoslavia. Counting bogged down as the renamed Socialist Party and opposition leaders accused each other of manipulation and voting irregularities. Partial returns were still being held back from Yugoslav media more than five hours after the polls closed.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a pig farm, at the end of a country road recently upgraded from mud to gravel, Russian soldiers stand a round-the-clock guard over the scene of an alleged war crime that investigators doubt will ever come to trial. The swampy site, deep in Serb-held territory in this eastern Croatian village, is believed to be a mass grave holding the decomposed remains of more than 200 patients from Vukovar hospital who disappeared when the city fell to Serbian gunmen two years ago.
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | LAURA SILBER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic on Sunday bowed to threats of Western military strikes against his forces by signing an international peace plan designed to end the bloodshed in Bosnia. But because his signature came under duress and amid insistence by hard-line Karadzic compatriots that they still oppose the settlement, few of the diplomats and mediators involved in 11th-hour peace talks here were willing to characterize Karadzic's concession as a breakthrough in the year-old war.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|