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NEWS
August 11, 1995
The recent Croatian offensive captured a large swath of territory, redrawing the Balkan battle lines once again. With the conflict in the Balkans entering this new chapter, here's a review of what the many sides are after, where they are and, perhaps, where they are headed. What are the differences between Serbs and Croats? Although they speak nearly identical languages, Serbs and Croats are divided by history, religion and alphabet.
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NEWS
August 11, 1995
The recent Croatian offensive captured a large swath of territory, redrawing the Balkan battle lines once again. With the conflict in the Balkans entering this new chapter, here's a review of what the many sides are after, where they are and, perhaps, where they are headed. What are the differences between Serbs and Croats? Although they speak nearly identical languages, Serbs and Croats are divided by history, religion and alphabet.
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NEWS
December 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's family was doubly humiliated in Serbia's weekend election, with support for the neo-Communist party of his wife, Mirjana Markovic, crashing even more than for his own Socialists. Based on returns from more than half the polling stations, Markovic's Yugoslav Left, or JUL, won the support of just 0.37% of voters, far below the 5% it had needed to stay in the Serbian parliament, the electoral commission said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1999
Knowing that the embassies of non-involved nations exist in Belgrade, doesn't it seem incredibly stupid of NATO and the U.S. government to have depended upon old maps or intelligence information rather than simply going through diplomatic channels to confirm the locations of such embassies? Incredibly, unbelievably stupid. WILLIAM G. FAWCETT Tujunga Part of NATO's 50th anniversary celebration includes a name change. NATO will now be know as TGTCSS (The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight)
TRAVEL
June 11, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
AT a cafe in the city's train station, I got a dark look when I remarked on the clerk's perfect English. "You're in Serbia, not on Mars," she said mirthlessly. I may have deserved the rebuke, but my mistake was understandable. Western visitors who gleaned most of what they know about this country from news reports during the 1992-95 Balkan wars are bound to be pleasantly surprised at almost every turn in the Serbian capital.
OPINION
April 18, 1999 | Zachary Karabell, Zachary Karabell is the author of "Architects of Intervention: The United States, The Third World and the Cold War."
Explaining the rationale for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's intervention in Kosovo, President Bill Clinton said, "I want us to live in a world where we all get along with each other, with all of our differences." Several days later, clarifying Clinton's Rodney G. King approach to international conflict, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen summed up U.S. and NATO goals: "No. 1, to demonstrate resolve on the part of the NATO alliance; No.
OPINION
April 4, 1999 | Paul W. Schroeder, Paul W. Schroeder, professor of history and political science emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is the author of "The Transformation of European Politics, 1763-1848."
History provides no simple answers to big questions, particularly those involving policy. One thing it can do, as historian Carl L. Becker remarked, is help free us from the tyranny of misleading historical analogies. Let me discuss certain ones as they apply to Kosovo. One can be quickly dismissed: the analogy between the situation today and those of World Wars I and II, suggesting that the current crisis could lead to World War III.
OPINION
May 9, 1999 | Steven Merritt Miner
From the outset of the war in Kosovo, the Russian government objected in the strongest possible terms to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's bombing of Yugoslavia. At first, many Western leaders and analysts believed that the Russian objections could be ignored with impunity, because the evils of the Serbian-led slaughter and expulsion of ethnic Albanian Kosovars seemed so manifest, and Russian isolation and weakness so evident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | The Rev. STEVEN P. TSICHLIS, Father Steven Tsichlis is the pastor of St. Paul's Greek Orthodox Church in Irvine and a member of the advisory board of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship
Extremist leaders of the nationalist Serbian government of President Slobodan Milosevic would have the world believe theirs is a cause backed by religious righteousness. Milosevic himself often appears on television with icons of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the background. But the church, closely linked with other Eastern Orthodox churches around the world, has a well established record--little known in the West--of opposition to the fanatical regime.
OPINION
May 16, 1993 | Henry A. Kissinger, Henry A. Kissinger, former U.S. secretary of state, writes regularly for The Times
Rarely has a President been faced with decisions involving the Hobson's choice presented to Bill Clinton over Bosnia. If the Bosnian Serbs reject the Vance-Owen plan, he is being urged to bring them into line by military action, probably bombing. If they accept the plan, he seems committed to contributing 20,000 U.S. troops to a peacekeeping force of more than 60,000. And he may well wind up being obliged to take both steps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1999 | MONAMI CHAKRABARTI, Editor's note: Monami Chakrabarti, a 1999 Newbury Park High School graduate, won first place in state-level competition in the National Peace Essay Contest sponsored by the United States Institute of Peace. The institute, created and funded by Congress, sponsors the contest to promote education on international peace and conflict resolution. Chakrabarti joined other winners in Washington, D.C., June 19-24 and will receive a scholarship. Her essay follows
It is a perforated, light blue swatch of mesh that represents the obstructed view of the world for a nation of people who were once free. Embedded in this piece of the burka is the story of the Afghan people--the story of the tears, suffering and suppression of millions of Afghan women, the denial of human rights and the history of a conflict that brewed for years.
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