Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSerbia Politics
IN THE NEWS

Serbia Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television moderator had to shout to be heard over his quarreling guests--representatives of Serbia's political parties--as he tried to end the program. "This has been a discussion on national reconciliation!" he yelled to his broadcast audience. "Thank you for joining us!" As a new political season heats up in Serbia, opposition forces are at each other's throats.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
June 11, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
AT a cafe in the city's train station, I got a dark look when I remarked on the clerk's perfect English. "You're in Serbia, not on Mars," she said mirthlessly. I may have deserved the rebuke, but my mistake was understandable. Western visitors who gleaned most of what they know about this country from news reports during the 1992-95 Balkan wars are bound to be pleasantly surprised at almost every turn in the Serbian capital.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica struggled to solidify power amid political bickering and the threat of a backlash by rogue police units, allies of ousted leader Slobodan Milosevic broke off talks Tuesday on handing over control of Serbia's government.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | Associated Press
In a vote marred by charges of fraud, a protege of Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic appeared headed for victory Sunday in Serbia's presidential elections. But it was unclear if the turnout was high enough for a valid vote. It was the fourth time in three months that Serbs tried to elect a successor to Milosevic, now the president of Yugoslavia, which is composed of Serbia and Montenegro. The clash again pitted his ally, Socialist Milan Milutinovic, against ultranationalist Vojislav Seselj.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shunned by the world, abandoned by former allies and unable to control the violence consuming his country, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appears in deep political trouble. United Nations sanctions imposed a week ago have had little visible effect on an economy already ravaged by war, but they have struck a collapsing blow to the Serbian psyche, especially in prosperous and cosmopolitan Belgrade. "It's embarrassing for us to have to wait in line for gasoline.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It boils down to a contest between a nationalist zealot who has sparked Europe's deadliest war in half a century and a gregarious U.S. millionaire who promises peace and reconciliation with the West. Still, Sunday's election for Serbian president will be close. The fate of millions hangs on the outcome of this imperfect, unpredictable vote, as the Balkan war that has already killed tens of thousands threatens now to spread south.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A palace coup in the Yugoslav capital of Belgrade and violent clashes between police and anti-regime demonstrators herald a dangerous strengthening of Serbian nationalism that could worsen ethnic conflicts throughout the Balkans. Indeed, the political stage is set for a power struggle between Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic and a nationalist rival of his own making that holds the clear potential for a deadly Serb-against-Serb civil war.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic on Friday suffered one of the most damaging setbacks of his six years in power when a gathering he called to rally Serbian leaders behind a Western peace plan collapsed into a melee of name-calling and protests.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica struggled to solidify power amid political bickering and the threat of a backlash by rogue police units, allies of ousted leader Slobodan Milosevic broke off talks Tuesday on handing over control of Serbia's government.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Milutinovic, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's handpicked candidate, was declared the winner Monday of a fraud-marred election for the presidency of Serbia. Opponents immediately cried foul. But this is a fraud international officials are not likely to protest too vociferously. The reason: Milutinovic's rival was an unpredictable ultranationalist whom the West refuses to recognize. Weary Serbs went to the polls Sunday for the fourth time in 2 1/2 months to elect a president.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | Associated Press
In a vote marred by charges of fraud, a protege of Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic appeared headed for victory Sunday in Serbia's presidential elections. But it was unclear if the turnout was high enough for a valid vote. It was the fourth time in three months that Serbs tried to elect a successor to Milosevic, now the president of Yugoslavia, which is composed of Serbia and Montenegro. The clash again pitted his ally, Socialist Milan Milutinovic, against ultranationalist Vojislav Seselj.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in as many months, the people of Serbia tried to choose a president Sunday in an election that offered bleak choices and boded ill--whatever the outcome--for the volatile region's future. The leading candidates are the proxy of Balkan strongman Slobodan Milosevic and a violent ultranationalist whose victory would deepen Serbia's status as an international pariah.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television moderator had to shout to be heard over his quarreling guests--representatives of Serbia's political parties--as he tried to end the program. "This has been a discussion on national reconciliation!" he yelled to his broadcast audience. "Thank you for joining us!" As a new political season heats up in Serbia, opposition forces are at each other's throats.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bare nail and the faded shadow of a forgotten picture are all that decorate the wall over Miroslav Martic's desk. After two months on the job as deputy mayor, he said, there has been no time to settle into his City Hall office. "Everything here is still just as I found it," he explained, enjoying for a moment the comfort of a chair. "My day begins at 7 a.m. and ends between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. I always knew there were problems in this city, but that they were so big--I couldn't even guess."
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local elections won by opponents of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic were officially recognized Tuesday by the Serbian parliament, virtually securing opposition rule in Belgrade and 13 other disputed cities. "Get ready for a huge party," said Zarko Korac, an opposition member of parliament. "There will soon be a couple hundred thousand people celebrating in the streets of Belgrade."
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic's ruling Socialists emerged Monday as front-runners in parliamentary elections, but their apparent failure to win an absolute majority may add a governing crisis to Serbia's economic chaos. The Socialists nevertheless declared victory, and Milosevic set off for another round of peace talks in Geneva amid reports that nationalist allies in Bosnia-Herzegovina will give up captured territory in pursuit of a peace plan.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local elections won by opponents of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic were officially recognized Tuesday by the Serbian parliament, virtually securing opposition rule in Belgrade and 13 other disputed cities. "Get ready for a huge party," said Zarko Korac, an opposition member of parliament. "There will soon be a couple hundred thousand people celebrating in the streets of Belgrade."
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the rally here ended, the workers carefully took down the posters of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, folding the pieces of tape so as not to spoil the edges. After all, the posters, as well as the banners and the red, white and blue Serbian flags, would be reused at the next such event in the next town.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took only a couple of hours for the besieged government of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to use the visit of a U.S. official to its advantage. Even as thousands of demonstrators rallied in Belgrade, the Serbian and Yugoslav capital, in protests well into their third week, a U.S. commercial officer met with a senior official of Milosevic's regime in view of state television cameras.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|