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Serbia Revolts

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NEWS
May 4, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was when the Yugoslav army arrived--heavily armed soldiers outfitted in camouflage, their faces painted dark--that 32-year-old Idriz decided to send away his wife and children. Violence that rocked Serbia's Albanian-dominated Kosovo province had until then remained the work of brutal but badly organized police. The deployment of Yugoslav troops late last month, however, upped the ante and opened a new front in the battle for Kosovo.
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NEWS
May 4, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was when the Yugoslav army arrived--heavily armed soldiers outfitted in camouflage, their faces painted dark--that 32-year-old Idriz decided to send away his wife and children. Violence that rocked Serbia's Albanian-dominated Kosovo province had until then remained the work of brutal but badly organized police. The deployment of Yugoslav troops late last month, however, upped the ante and opened a new front in the battle for Kosovo.
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NEWS
December 31, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic came under new pressure Monday with the purported rebellion of an elite army unit, while leaders of anti-government street demonstrations planned their largest rally yet for New Year's Eve. On the 43rd consecutive day of protest against alleged election fraud, thousands of students and other demonstrators paraded over ice-coated streets through police gantlets and heard from a young activist released from jail after 25 days.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic came under new pressure Monday with the purported rebellion of an elite army unit, while leaders of anti-government street demonstrations planned their largest rally yet for New Year's Eve. On the 43rd consecutive day of protest against alleged election fraud, thousands of students and other demonstrators paraded over ice-coated streets through police gantlets and heard from a young activist released from jail after 25 days.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a military coup still loomed over Yugoslavia after anti-Communist unrest subsided Thursday, but the crisis in Serbia has kindled some hope of an eventual easing of the ethnic hostilities pushing Yugoslavs toward civil war. Serbia's hard-line president, Slobodan Milosevic, has suffered what many see as a mortal wound to his authority, confronting him with a choice of relaxing totalitarian rule and bellicose national policies or risking a violent overthrow.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL MONTGOMERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As this country balances precariously between war and peace, the man likely to tip the scales is an uncompromising Communist who has built his career on a strategy of rigid authoritarian rule wrapped in born-again nationalist rhetoric. Slobodan Milosevic's stature rose to almost mythical dimensions among Serbs who worshipped him for reinvigorating pride in Serbia by brutally subjugating other ethnic groups, particularly the Albanians of Kosovo province.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian students protesting against President Slobodan Milosevic plan to march to the Czech Republic Embassy today to place flowers in honor of the so-called Velvet Revolution that toppled communism in Czechoslovakia seven years ago. The comparison between anti-Milosevic rallies here and the domino demonstrations that ended communism in most of Eastern Europe in 1989 is a common one. It is an analogy that the students and opposition parties leading the Serbian protests enjoy and promote.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian students protesting against President Slobodan Milosevic plan to march to the Czech Republic Embassy today to place flowers in honor of the so-called Velvet Revolution that toppled communism in Czechoslovakia seven years ago. The comparison between anti-Milosevic rallies here and the domino demonstrations that ended communism in most of Eastern Europe in 1989 is a common one. It is an analogy that the students and opposition parties leading the Serbian protests enjoy and promote.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL MONTGOMERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As this country balances precariously between war and peace, the man likely to tip the scales is an uncompromising Communist who has built his career on a strategy of rigid authoritarian rule wrapped in born-again nationalist rhetoric. Slobodan Milosevic's stature rose to almost mythical dimensions among Serbs who worshipped him for reinvigorating pride in Serbia by brutally subjugating other ethnic groups, particularly the Albanians of Kosovo province.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a military coup still loomed over Yugoslavia after anti-Communist unrest subsided Thursday, but the crisis in Serbia has kindled some hope of an eventual easing of the ethnic hostilities pushing Yugoslavs toward civil war. Serbia's hard-line president, Slobodan Milosevic, has suffered what many see as a mortal wound to his authority, confronting him with a choice of relaxing totalitarian rule and bellicose national policies or risking a violent overthrow.
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