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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1987 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
There's something of an architectural--not to mention functional--contrast in the two buildings that sit side by side on the San Marcos hillside. In one--a quintessential California multipurpose auditorium with a stage at one end, a kitchen at the other and 800 chairs and folding tables in between--bingo players gather weekly to try their luck.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2002 | From Religion News Service
Twenty-five years ago, just about every seminarian on this campus was a young man who spoke such fluent Greek that he could pass for native in the cafes of Athens. Today, more than 20% of students at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology have no Greek roots.
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NEWS
August 12, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that President Slobodan Milosevic is leading Yugoslavia into "certain disaster," Serbian Orthodox Church leaders formally called on him Wednesday to resign. The church joined the growing opposition movement trying to oust Milosevic after a synod of bishops decided that he and Serbian President Milan Milutinovic are "turning their own people into hostages."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | LARRY STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Very Rev. Dositei Obradovich, a spiritual leader of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the United States and for decades the only celibate American monk to carry the ancient title of archimandrite, has died. He was 84. Archimandrite Obradovich died in his sleep Tuesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena from cardiac arrest brought on by pneumonia and renal failure. He also suffered from diabetes. He was admitted to the hospital two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1987 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
There's something of an architectural--not to mention functional--contrast in the two buildings that sit side by side on the San Marcos hillside. In one--a quintessential California multipurpose auditorium with a stage at one end, a kitchen at the other and 800 chairs and folding tables in between--bingo players gather weekly to try their luck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All through the night Tuesday the congregants came to the Serbian Orthodox Church in Arcadia, bearing champagne to celebrate New Year's and their Christmas holiday that comes next week. And all through the night the church elders had to turn them away. An arson fire set early Tuesday morning had nearly gutted the church's stand-alone kitchen, as well as its social hall where Tuesday night's New Year's celebration was to take place.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | Associated Press
In solemn silence that contrasted with months of raucous political protests, tens of thousands of people marched Monday in the Serbian capital's largest religious procession since World War II. Riot police quietly withdrew to allow the head of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Pavle, to lead the early morning procession through the streets of Belgrade. The outpouring of national sentiment followed 10 weeks of peaceful protest against President Slobodan Milosevic for annulling Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | The Rev. STEVEN P. TSICHLIS, Father Steven Tsichlis is the pastor of St. Paul's Greek Orthodox Church in Irvine and a member of the advisory board of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship
Extremist leaders of the nationalist Serbian government of President Slobodan Milosevic would have the world believe theirs is a cause backed by religious righteousness. Milosevic himself often appears on television with icons of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the background. But the church, closely linked with other Eastern Orthodox churches around the world, has a well established record--little known in the West--of opposition to the fanatical regime.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In America's diverse culture, the notion of a civil war charged with religious conflict is hard to grasp. But religious identity has been present constantly in the antagonisms that have fragmented the Balkans for centuries--setting neighbor against neighbor, Muslims against Orthodox Christians, and Orthodox Christians against Western Christians, who are represented, at least symbolically in the current conflict, by NATO.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | From Religion News Service
The vast, cave-like interior of the unfinished St. Sava Cathedral echoes with sporadic hammering. Construction on the squat, concrete dome, which one day will be the largest Christian Orthodox Church in the Balkans, has been slowed by shortages and funding problems--a consequence of the U.N. embargo against the former Yugoslavia. "This is the very spot where 400 years ago, Turks burned the relics of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER and MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITERS
Orthodox Christians in Southern California celebrated Christmas this week with a new recognition of the chasm between the peace promised by the Christ child and the often brutal century that has just closed. Contrasts in hopes and reality can be stark at Christmastime, when high expectations engendered by the holiday season are not met.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after NATO bombs cut short Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's systematic effort to purge Kosovo of ethnic Albanians, mounting evidence suggests that some Albanians are now engaged in an "ethnic cleansing" campaign of their own--in this case, with the province's remaining Serbs as its victims.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that President Slobodan Milosevic is leading Yugoslavia into "certain disaster," Serbian Orthodox Church leaders formally called on him Wednesday to resign. The church joined the growing opposition movement trying to oust Milosevic after a synod of bishops decided that he and Serbian President Milan Milutinovic are "turning their own people into hostages."
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A large explosion damaged a Serbian Orthodox church in the center of Pristina early today, a NATO spokesman said. The blast was heard throughout Kosovo's capital, rattling buildings, setting off car alarms and dogs barking, and sending a large cloud of smoke and dust into the air. Capt. Stefan Eder, a NATO spokesman, said there were no initial indications of any casualties. "There are structural damages," he said. But Eder said officials did not know what caused the blast or who was involved.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | JULIE TAMAKI and VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Serbian Orthodox Church leaders marked the anniversary of a mythic battle Monday by lighting candles, chanting prayers and condemning the international community for failing to stem a steady exodus of Serbs from Kosovo. Fearing retribution at the hands of returning ethnic Albanian refugees, nearly 80,000 Serbs are believed to have fled Kosovo since international peacekeepers replaced Serbian police forces in the province less than three weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | The Rev. STEVEN P. TSICHLIS, Father Steven Tsichlis is the pastor of St. Paul's Greek Orthodox Church in Irvine and a member of the advisory board of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship
Extremist leaders of the nationalist Serbian government of President Slobodan Milosevic would have the world believe theirs is a cause backed by religious righteousness. Milosevic himself often appears on television with icons of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the background. But the church, closely linked with other Eastern Orthodox churches around the world, has a well established record--little known in the West--of opposition to the fanatical regime.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Serbian Orthodox Church, for centuries a pillar of support for Serbian rulers, issued a blistering criticism on Thursday of President Slobodan Milosevic, accusing his government of stealing elections and provoking bloodshed. Calling on Milosevic to "recognize the will of the people," the church gave a significant boost to opposition forces that for more than six weeks have demonstrated to demand Milosevic restore election results that he threw out.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A large explosion damaged a Serbian Orthodox church in the center of Pristina early today, a NATO spokesman said. The blast was heard throughout Kosovo's capital, rattling buildings, setting off car alarms and dogs barking, and sending a large cloud of smoke and dust into the air. Capt. Stefan Eder, a NATO spokesman, said there were no initial indications of any casualties. "There are structural damages," he said. But Eder said officials did not know what caused the blast or who was involved.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In America's diverse culture, the notion of a civil war charged with religious conflict is hard to grasp. But religious identity has been present constantly in the antagonisms that have fragmented the Balkans for centuries--setting neighbor against neighbor, Muslims against Orthodox Christians, and Orthodox Christians against Western Christians, who are represented, at least symbolically in the current conflict, by NATO.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | Associated Press
In solemn silence that contrasted with months of raucous political protests, tens of thousands of people marched Monday in the Serbian capital's largest religious procession since World War II. Riot police quietly withdrew to allow the head of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Pavle, to lead the early morning procession through the streets of Belgrade. The outpouring of national sentiment followed 10 weeks of peaceful protest against President Slobodan Milosevic for annulling Nov.
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