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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A Serbian publisher said Wednesday it has withdrawn a controversial book by American writer Sherry Jones because of protests from the local Islamic community. The book, "Jewel of Medina," is about Aisha, one of the Prophet Muhammad's wives. It gained worldwide attention after Random House canceled its publication, fearing an uproar in the Islamic world. Serbian publisher BeoBook released the book but decided to withdraw it because of protests from local Islamic leaders who said it insulted Muhammad and his family.
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NEWS
May 27, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her body savaged, her family wronged and her future ruined, 13-year-old Pranvera Lokaj has taken off for the mountains of Kosovo to seek the only solace her hidebound clan accords a rape victim: to kill or be killed in pursuit of vengeance. "I have given her to the KLA so she can do to the Serbs what they have done to us," Haxhi Lokaj said of his daughter, who has been sent to fight with the rebels of the Kosovo Liberation Army.
BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | Christopher Merrill, Christopher Merrill 's most recent book of poetry is "Watch Fire" (White Pine Press)
Where shall we place our faith, in the individual or in the tribe? For Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Simic the answer is a function of poetry itself: "Lyric poets perpetuate the oldest values on earth," he reminds us. "They assert the individual's experience against that of the tribe." Those values, needless to say, are under attack around the world. Religious fundamentalists, ardent nationalists, tribalists of every color and moral suasion--all seek to diminish the worth of individual experience.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
With its low-cost labor and scenic locales, Serbia has long been a popular European location for filming. Now, facing rising competition from neighboring countries such as Hungary, the Czech Republic and Germany, the country wants to up its game. The Serbian government has approved a new film incentive program specifically targeted to foreign productions. The program provides a 15% cash rebate on goods and services purchased in Serbia and a 12% rebate on labor expenses, including foreign crew and talent.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a schoolboy, Blagoje Adzic is said to have hidden and watched from a tree as Croatian fascists rampaged through his village and slaughtered every member of his family in 1941. The unspeakable horrors committed during one of Europe's bloodiest fratricides have haunted Adzic for half a century. Frequent public references to the loss of his family confirm that the emotional wounds have never healed.
WORLD
February 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of Serbs gathered to bury a 20-year-old engineering student killed when a mob set fire to the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade, the Serbian capital, during protests last week over Kosovo's declaration of independence. Students, teachers and relatives wept as they spoke of Zoran Vujovic while surrounding his flower-laden casket in Novi Sad, about 50 miles north of Belgrade. Relatives said he wanted only to protest U.S. support for Kosovo's secession. In nearby Bosnia-Herzegovina, police fired tear gas to prevent Bosnian Serb rioters from storming the U.S. Consulate in Banja Luka, in the ethnically divided country's Serbian area.
WORLD
June 19, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Four former members of a notorious Serbian paramilitary unit called the Scorpions were convicted of gunning down 14 Kosovo Albanian civilians, including children and the elderly, in 1999, and were sentenced to between 15 and 20 years in prison. The massacre in Kosovo's northern town of Podujevo was one of the most brutal single atrocities during the 1998-99 Kosovo war, during which an estimated 10,000 people were killed in fighting between guerrillas of the ethnic Albanian Kosovo Liberation Army and Serbian forces loyal to President Slobodan Milosevic.
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