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NEWS
September 11, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping up pressure on the defiant Bosnian Serbs, a U.S. Navy warship launched a battery of sophisticated Tomahawk cruise missiles late Sunday against the rebels' antiaircraft installations in northern Bosnia, NATO officials said. Thirteen Tomahawks--expensive and precise weapons that are said to defy bad weather--were fired from the guided-missile cruiser Normandy in the Adriatic Sea toward the Bosnian Serb-held city of Banja Luka.
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NEWS
August 3, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A United Nations tribunal found a former Bosnian Serb general guilty of genocide Thursday in the Srebrenica massacre of more than 7,000 Muslims six years ago, a ruling that is the first genocide conviction handed down for war crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia. Radislav Krstic, who played a central role in Europe's bloodiest atrocity since World War II, was sentenced to 46 years in prison.
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NEWS
March 30, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her face was hidden by a screen, her voice scrambled electronically. Identified as Victim No. 50, she opened her private chamber of horrors Wednesday, telling the world how she and women like her were forced to become the sexual property of Bosnian Serbs. "They would point their finger: 'You, you and you,' " said the rape victim, who was 16 at the time of her Bosnian war ordeal.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Bosnian Serb accused of commanding a notorious detention camp where hundreds of Muslims and Croats were killed, tortured and raped was acquitted of genocide. Dusko Sikirica, 37, alleged commander of Keraterm camp, had pleaded not guilty to genocide, complicity to commit genocide, crimes against humanity and violating the laws or customs of war. He was the first camp commander in Bosnia-Herzegovina to face the Yugoslavia war crimes tribunal in The Hague on a genocide charge.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian nationalists besieging the Bihac "safe area" in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Saturday ordered its Muslim defenders to surrender or face annihilation--a catastrophe the U.N. peacekeeping mission said it was powerless to prevent. Bosnian and Croatian Serb rebels have positioned surface-to-air missiles around their artillery emplacements to ward off NATO air strikes aimed at halting their onslaught, said an official at U.N. Protection Force headquarters here.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Britain and France on Thursday that the allies' threat to launch air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina is the "last chance" for the U.N. peacekeeping force there and called for "a strong air response to raise the price of Serbian aggression." "You can't go about the world saying you're going to do something and then not do it," the President said at a news conference.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | From Associated Press
Bosnian Serbs said Saturday that they are lifting their siege of the devastated city of Gorazde under agreements made at international peace talks. Fighting continued in the besieged capital of Sarajevo, however, and three U.N. peacekeepers were reported wounded. Outgunned Bosnian government forces have been waging a weeklong offensive to loosen the Serbian noose around the city before the peace agreements are carried out. Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said in a statement to Press Assn.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | From Associated Press
Rebel Serbs fired a barrage of tank shells and launched an infantry assault on the outskirts of an eastern Bosnian enclave Saturday. A U.N. peacekeeper was killed by government troops while fleeing the onslaught. The Dutch soldier was the 67th peacekeeper killed in combat in the former Yugoslavia since 1992. NATO warplanes were called in after Serbs attacked the enclave and shelled a U.N. observation post, but air strikes were not requested, U.N.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first blast jarred 60-year-old Zuria Brodlic from his small bed onto the cold concrete floor. The second blast threw patrolling U.S. Army soldiers to the ground and covered them with glass, bricks and debris. Within 45 minutes, nine houses belonging to Muslim families around this village in northeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina were blown apart. The Nov.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A glassy-eyed federal soldier staggering over the worn marble paving stones of Mostar's famed Turkish Bridge reminded Becir Kurasepi of a thorn in independent Bosnia-Herzegovina's side. Mostar, a predominantly Muslim city of 100,000 that has been a favorite tourist destination for centuries, has been transformed into a federal army garrison town, and its cozy cafes are now venues for brawling.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the battle to win Bosnia's peace, thousands of NATO troops join legions of foreign bureaucrats with a multibillion-dollar arsenal of tanks, helicopters and aid money. There is also a simpler weapon: the black felt pen. In many Bosnian schools, it is not enough to teach history, art and grammar to the nation's Croatian, Serbian and Muslim children; they're also taught to hate those from other ethnic groups.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ratko Tisanovic's eyes move unconsciously to his calloused hands as he ponders how his role in the brutal siege of Sarajevo changed his life. "Before the war, you couldn't find what we had anywhere else in Europe," recalls the former restaurateur who now earns barely enough from a sawmill job just outside Sarajevo to pay for the cigarettes that help take his mind off hunger and sorrow. "But we lost all of this because we went to war for a state of our own," he concedes.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Angry over the arrest of a Serbian militant who allegedly attacked ethnic Albanians, thousands of Serbs blocked roads Tuesday into their part of this Kosovo city and staged mass rallies to demand the man's release. French soldiers backed by six armored personnel carriers blocked the main bridge over the Ibar River, which divides the Serbian and ethnic Albanian communities, refusing to allow even U.N. employees to cross.
NEWS
July 15, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's 6 billionth person is just a knock on the door away from joining the legions of Bosnians with no place to call home. Little Adnan Mevic's fortunes looked a lot better when he was born two minutes after midnight Oct. 12 in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina's capital. United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan was in the capital on official business and needed a baby to pose with because U.N. demographers had decided that the 6 billionth person would enter the world on that day. U.N.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her face was hidden by a screen, her voice scrambled electronically. Identified as Victim No. 50, she opened her private chamber of horrors Wednesday, telling the world how she and women like her were forced to become the sexual property of Bosnian Serbs. "They would point their finger: 'You, you and you,' " said the rape victim, who was 16 at the time of her Bosnian war ordeal.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
In a striking change from Washington's wartime sympathies, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright praised the leadership of the Serb-run half of Bosnia on Thursday, pronouncing it ahead of the rest of the country on political and economic reforms. With Bosnian Serb Prime Minister Milorad Dodik at her side, Albright said moderate forces in Republika Srpska, as the Serbian entity is known, "have been fighting the good fight. . . .
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Bosnia's rival groups stepped up their fight for key districts of Sarajevo on Saturday, just hours after U.N. peacekeepers managed to get their military commanders to sit down together for talks. Machine-gun and mortar fire rattled through the city's western suburbs overnight as Serbian forces appeared to be trying to link up with units in the north of the city. Sarajevo radio said Serbs bombarded the suburb of Dobrinja at dawn Saturday.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a U.S.-brokered peace agreement ended the war in Bosnia last year, Western mediators soothed critics who warned that leaving hard-line Bosnian Serb leaders in place was a mistake. In time, the mediators said, men like Radovan Karadzic and army commander Gen. Ratko Mladic--both indicted on war crimes charges--would find themselves isolated and fall by the wayside.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
A former Bosnian Serb police commander was flown to The Hague on Monday, hours after his arrest by NATO peacekeepers in Bosnia, to stand trial on charges of enslaving and raping Bosnian Muslim women during the 1992-1995 war. Radomir Kovac, 38, was detained early Monday in his apartment in Foca in southeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sabira Pazarac's strength and persistence went a long way in keeping her family together. The Muslim seamstress opened her store almost every day of Bosnia-Herzegovina's 3 1/2-year war and furiously sewed clothes custom-ordered by the wives of the men who were, essentially, her Serbian captors. "People were saying: 'How can you work? They are rounding people up and shooting them, and you just sit behind your sewing machine,' " she said. "That is what sustained me.
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