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Serbians Security

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December 10, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milorad Jokic, a well-dressed lawyer from a prominent Sarajevo Serbian family, spoke calmly Saturday of his fears of life under the rule of the Muslim-led Bosnian government. But suddenly, as he described what he expects will be a brutal future of misery and intimidation, the 61-year-old man's eyes reddened and his face contorted in uncontrollable sobs. "Where will I go?" he cried, standing in the middle of the Ilidza market. "I have no place to go, but I cannot wait for the Muslims to come.
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NEWS
October 19, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the next few weeks, hundreds of foreign observers are due here in the war-ravaged Serbian province of Kosovo to start the hazardous job of making it safe for thousands of refugees to return. But before they can do that, they have to find safe places to live themselves. A team of about 20 technical experts plans to travel across most of the province today to search for housing, office space and other basics for an expected 2,000 monitors.
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NEWS
October 19, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the next few weeks, hundreds of foreign observers are due here in the war-ravaged Serbian province of Kosovo to start the hazardous job of making it safe for thousands of refugees to return. But before they can do that, they have to find safe places to live themselves. A team of about 20 technical experts plans to travel across most of the province today to search for housing, office space and other basics for an expected 2,000 monitors.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milorad Jokic, a well-dressed lawyer from a prominent Sarajevo Serbian family, spoke calmly Saturday of his fears of life under the rule of the Muslim-led Bosnian government. But suddenly, as he described what he expects will be a brutal future of misery and intimidation, the 61-year-old man's eyes reddened and his face contorted in uncontrollable sobs. "Where will I go?" he cried, standing in the middle of the Ilidza market. "I have no place to go, but I cannot wait for the Muslims to come.
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