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April 9, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like hundreds of thousands of his fellow Kosovo Albanians, Bashkim Millaku was forced at gunpoint to leave his home and his country by Serbian troops last week. On his way, the 36-year-old father of two was caught in a roundup of 400 men, held prisoner for three days and two nights, tormented mentally and physically, robbed and denied food and water. He was used as a human shield. By the time Millaku reached Albania on Saturday night, he was in shock.
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NEWS
April 17, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Milos Vlaskovic thought he knew what happened in the predominantly Muslim Bosnian town of Srebrenica in the summer of 1995. "I've heard there was a fight between the units of two armies in which Serbian forces were far stronger, and that's why far more Muslim soldiers died," said Vlaskovic, 22, a third-year history student at Belgrade University.
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NEWS
April 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant escalation of tensions between the two Balkan neighbors, Albania on Tuesday charged that Yugoslav troops had violated its territory, shelling and burning homes in a remote border village before withdrawing. Yugoslav officials denied the report, but international peace monitors in the border area said Yugoslav troops had entered the village of Kamenica and set part of it on fire before withdrawing after 1 1/2 hours.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gunmen fired on a joint American-Russian patrol Sunday as it tried to seal the boundary between Kosovo and part of southern Serbia where ethnic Albanian rebels have been challenging Yugoslav forces, the U.S. Army said. There were no casualties in the attack, the first reported against NATO-led peacekeepers since ethnic Albanian rebels escalated cross-border raids in November.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In cafes and on street corners, anywhere people meet to talk politics in this hardscrabble capital, a consensus is taking shape: Albanians will do anything for their beleaguered "brothers" in the neighboring Yugoslav province of Kosovo--anything, that is, except fight for them. Just over the border, an estimated 250 people have died since February in Kosovo, which is part of Serbia but is 90% ethnic Albanian.
NEWS
August 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Serbian forces captured three more villages in western Kosovo, pushing ethnic Albanian militants away from Pec, the province's second-largest city, media reported Monday. Yugoslavia's state-run Tanjug news agency said Serbian police "crushed" important strongholds of the rebel Kosovo Liberation Army in the villages of Lodja, Grabovac and Rausic, all just outside Pec. The push comes a day after the Serbs gained control of Junik, the rebels' main logistical and weapons distribution center.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they boarded the Fati Tours bus from Slovenia to Kosovo last July, Baljaj Naim, Zogaj Enver and Hrecaj Haljit were much like the 51 other ethnic Albanian passengers. Like the others, the three men were contract workers going home--their pockets full of hard-earned construction wages--to wives, children and parents they hadn't seen for months.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 500 exhausted, emaciated Kosovo men of fighting age staggered across the border into Albania on Sunday, telling harrowing tales of being beaten, starved and forced to fight one another like gladiators before their Serbian captors.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something strange is going on in this Kosovo Albanian village in what was once a hard-line guerrilla stronghold, where NATO accuses Serbs of committing genocide. An estimated 15,000 displaced ethnic Albanians live in and around Svetlje, in northern Kosovo, and hundreds of young men are everywhere, strolling along the dirt roads or lying on the grass on a spring day.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 300 members of Southern California's Serbian community gathered in front of the Federal Building in Westwood on Saturday to warn that the rights and lives of Serbian minorities may be jeopardized in the current struggles for independence in Yugoslavia. The demonstrators had often conflicting views about whether the states of Slovenia and Croatia should be permitted to break free from the nation created from disparate peoples after World War I.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Yugoslav army sent tanks and reinforcements near the NATO-patrolled boundary with Kosovo, a day before Yugoslavia's deadline for the Western alliance to crack down on ethnic Albanian militants whose attacks have inflamed the region. Yugoslav authorities have threatened to launch counterattacks after the deadline passes this afternoon. Many residents in Kosovo, which is a province of Serbia, Yugoslavia's main republic, want full independence.
NEWS
July 30, 2000
Los Angeles teachers won a victory important to themselves last week when the Board of Education, at the urging of Supt. Roy Romer, ended the practice of "me-too" raises. That inflexible precedent automatically gave other school district employees the pay hike negotiated by United Teachers-Los Angeles. The teachers union opposed one-size-fits-all raises, and we agree. Raises should be determined by performance. Teachers deserve to be paid much more, and this year they can expect a double-digit increase because of the healthiest state treasury in years.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police in Montenegro said Friday that they arrested two men who had shot and wounded a leading opponent of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic the night before in an apparent spread of Serbia's lethal politics to its more peaceful sister republic. The tantalizing announcement on Montenegrin Television's evening news said the police "know who ordered this crime" but did not yet want to tell the public.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gunman slightly wounded Serbia's most powerful opposition leader, Vuk Draskovic, late Thursday with a burst of automatic weapons fire at a coastal vacation home in the Yugoslav republic of Montenegro, police and aides to the politician said today. Members of Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement called the 11:30 p.m. shooting an assassination attempt, the second in less than a year on the longtime foe of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Draskovic, 53, was hit by two bullets.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | From Reuters
A slain Kosovo Serb U.N. worker had been accused of war crimes in an ethnic Albanian newspaper shortly before his death. The article brought strong condemnation Wednesday from Kosovo's international administration, which has frequently warned local newspapers that publishing the names of alleged war criminals could encourage people to take the law into their own hands.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | Reuters
Stone-throwing Serbs attacked U.S. troops of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization-led KFOR peacekeeping force in Kosovo, injuring one soldier, KFOR said Thursday. The attacks took place late Wednesday night in Vrbovac, near the southern town of Vitina. "Two Serb crowds numbering between 200 and 300 people attacked KFOR U.S. peacekeepers, throwing stones and hurling insults and threats," KFOR, or Kosovo Force, said in a statement. "One soldier was injured and required stitches."
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gunmen fired on a joint American-Russian patrol Sunday as it tried to seal the boundary between Kosovo and part of southern Serbia where ethnic Albanian rebels have been challenging Yugoslav forces, the U.S. Army said. There were no casualties in the attack, the first reported against NATO-led peacekeepers since ethnic Albanian rebels escalated cross-border raids in November.
NEWS
September 22, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The church was built of stones quarried six centuries ago from the rock of Kosovo, and before last week's blast it had the power to make people believe in miracles. For generations, through endless cycles of war and foreign occupation, people came to the small Serbian Orthodox shrine behind monastery walls and asked the spirits of saints to heal them. Pilgrims reached out to touch caskets said to contain relics of St. Cosma and St.
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was born amid ringing promises about the rule of law and the West's resolve to do the right thing. Madeleine Albright, now secretary of State, lauded the "commitment of the international community to bring those responsible for atrocities in the former Yugoslavia to justice." That was nearly seven years ago. Today, trials at the U.N.-established International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia grind on, but the most notorious suspects--Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadzic and Gen.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic Albanian snipers wounded two French peacekeepers in the strife-torn northern Kosovo city of Kosovska Mitrovica on Sunday, and French troops responded with gunfire that left one sniper dead and at least two snipers wounded, authorities said. Nearly 20 people were reported injured in the day's violence, which included a grenade attack on an ethnic Albanian home. The snipers killed or captured Sunday were "all [ethnic] Albanian terrorists," Lt. Col.
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