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August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright showed the U.N. Security Council photographs Thursday that she said depicted mass graves in Bosnia-Herzegovina that hold the bodies of as many as 2,700 civilians murdered by Bosnian Serb forces after two U.N.-protected "safe areas" were overrun last month. She said the photos, combined with witness accounts, provide a "compelling case that there were wide-scale atrocities committed . . . against defenseless civilians." A senior U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Milos Vojnovic, 50, a leader of ethnic Serbs in Croatia, died Friday at his home in Vukovar, Croatia, of an apparent heart attack. Vojnovic, a Serb, had worked as a judge in the Serb para-state that rebels proclaimed in the Vukovar area and other Croatian territories seized in the 1991 war. The fighting erupted when Serbs rebelled against the area's declaration of independence from the former Serb-dominated Yugoslavia.
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NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Slovenia and Croatia defied federal army warnings to disarm their militias by midnight Saturday, and the deadline was extended. A terse report from the state news agency Tanjug said, without elaboration, that the collective federal presidency extended the deadline until midnight Monday "following a Croatian request." Authorities in the two republics had put their defense forces on highest alert and citizens were hoarding food supplies, media reports from Slovenia and Croatia said.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major step away from war, rebel Serbs in Croatia agreed Sunday to return their breakaway enclave to Croatian government rule, ending an explosive situation that threatened to undermine Balkan peace talks. The agreement announced in the Croatian capital, Zagreb, by U.S. and U.N. mediators ends the Serbs' four-year rebellion and appears to avert, at least for now, a showdown between Serbian separatists and the Croatian army, whose troops have been massing in the area in recent days.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United Nations moved Thursday to strengthen its presence along a 160-mile route through Croatia to thwart brutal attacks by vengeful Croats against Serb refugees fleeing the country. At least two people have been killed and hundreds of others--including a carload of Serbian Orthodox nuns--injured since Wednesday, when the Croatian army began evacuating thousands of Croatian Serbs trapped by fighting near the town of Topusko, according to U.N. and witness accounts.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milenko Dobrijevic stood among the defeated soldiers of the Krajina Serb army, now dejected members of a miserable mass of refugees, and vowed revenge Thursday. "My grandfather was a Chetnik," he said, referring to the Serbian royalists known for their brutality in both world wars. "He took his revenge, and I will do the same. The first Muslim or Croat I meet, even an innocent one, I will take his house." "And I," proclaimed another of the soldiers, "will kill him."
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside last-minute diplomatic peace initiatives, Croatia this morning launched a powerful attack against rebel Serbs in the country's Krajina region. The U.N. command here said that heavy artillery began bombarding the rebel capital of Knin at first light, with between 200 and 300 shells striking the city in the first half-hour of the attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
In response to "Serbs Hide From Their Heritage," Feb. 19: Well, it is about time! I have been wondering how long it would take The Times to finally report the Serbian side. Croats and Nazis together under President Franjo Tudjman murdered tens of thousands of Serbians as well as Jews. Today, Croatian leaders are renaming streets after their heroes, Ustashi butchers. I would like to know why The Times has so faithfully failed to report the Serbian side. Both sides, as well as the Bosnians, have committed atrocities, yet The Times has chosen to demonize the Serbs.
NEWS
October 2, 1990
Minority Serbs declared self-government in the Republic of Croatia and blocked roads and train lines, fueling fears that the rising confrontation could lead to ethnic strife, news reports and witnesses said. The Serbian National Council, based in the town of Knin, said it was assuming political control of Croatia's Serbian enclaves of about 600,000 people "to protect their human dignity, human and national rights."
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two mortar shells slammed into the eastern Croatian town of Osijek late Sunday, killing at least two people and wounding a dozen others, local journalists and hospital officials said. Osijek is at the edge of a swath of land along Croatia's eastern border that has been held by rebel Serbs since a 1991 war. The state-run HINA news agency said that Croatian army units east of the town had repelled a Serb infantry attack. It gave no further details.
NEWS
October 4, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most difficult pieces in the Balkan peace puzzle began slipping into place Tuesday when leaders from Croatia and the breakaway Serb-controlled region of Eastern Slavonia agreed for the first time to a set of "guiding principles" for a settlement.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright showed the U.N. Security Council photographs Thursday that she said depicted mass graves in Bosnia-Herzegovina that hold the bodies of as many as 2,700 civilians murdered by Bosnian Serb forces after two U.N.-protected "safe areas" were overrun last month. She said the photos, combined with witness accounts, provide a "compelling case that there were wide-scale atrocities committed . . . against defenseless civilians." A senior U.S.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United Nations moved Thursday to strengthen its presence along a 160-mile route through Croatia to thwart brutal attacks by vengeful Croats against Serb refugees fleeing the country. At least two people have been killed and hundreds of others--including a carload of Serbian Orthodox nuns--injured since Wednesday, when the Croatian army began evacuating thousands of Croatian Serbs trapped by fighting near the town of Topusko, according to U.N. and witness accounts.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milenko Dobrijevic stood among the defeated soldiers of the Krajina Serb army, now dejected members of a miserable mass of refugees, and vowed revenge Thursday. "My grandfather was a Chetnik," he said, referring to the Serbian royalists known for their brutality in both world wars. "He took his revenge, and I will do the same. The first Muslim or Croat I meet, even an innocent one, I will take his house." "And I," proclaimed another of the soldiers, "will kill him."
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside last-minute diplomatic peace initiatives, Croatia this morning launched a powerful attack against rebel Serbs in the country's Krajina region. The U.N. command here said that heavy artillery began bombarding the rebel capital of Knin at first light, with between 200 and 300 shells striking the city in the first half-hour of the attack.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two mortar shells slammed into the eastern Croatian town of Osijek late Sunday, killing at least two people and wounding a dozen others, local journalists and hospital officials said. Osijek is at the edge of a swath of land along Croatia's eastern border that has been held by rebel Serbs since a 1991 war. The state-run HINA news agency said that Croatian army units east of the town had repelled a Serb infantry attack. It gave no further details.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbs from the rugged Krajina frontier concluded a referendum Sunday that is expected to give overwhelming approval to unification with other Serbs, a move toward creating a Greater Serbia in much of the former Yugoslav federation. As military vehicles blared the Serbian anthem, "March to Drina," through the streets of this Croatian region, voters flocked to the polls for the referendum on unification with Serbs in Bosnia-Herzegovina and "other Serbian countries."
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnia's foreign minister was killed Sunday when his helicopter was shot down over Serb-held territory, and Bosnian Serbs stepped up their defiance of the world's major powers by capturing yet another group of U.N. hostages, this time Britons. Serbs in neighboring Croatia, who are allied with the Bosnian Serbs, claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter carrying Bosnian Foreign Minister Irfan Ljubijankic. He was the highest-ranking government official killed in three years of war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
In response to "Serbs Hide From Their Heritage," Feb. 19: Well, it is about time! I have been wondering how long it would take The Times to finally report the Serbian side. Croats and Nazis together under President Franjo Tudjman murdered tens of thousands of Serbians as well as Jews. Today, Croatian leaders are renaming streets after their heroes, Ustashi butchers. I would like to know why The Times has so faithfully failed to report the Serbian side. Both sides, as well as the Bosnians, have committed atrocities, yet The Times has chosen to demonize the Serbs.
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