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WORLD
February 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Serbia's hard-line leaders on Saturday called the U.S. "the main culprit" in the violence that has broken out since Kosovo declared independence. Several thousand Serbs chanting, "Kosovo is Serbia!" and "Russia, Vladimir Putin!" protested peacefully in the ethnically divided town of Mitrovica, the sixth day of demonstrations against Kosovo's break with Serbia. Russia backs Serbia's fierce resistance to Kosovo's secession.
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WORLD
February 22, 2008 | Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson, Special to The Times
Angry Serbs protesting Kosovo's independence stormed the U.S. Embassy on Thursday night and set it on fire, as the fringes of a large and generally peaceful demonstration sponsored by the Serbian government turned violent. Serbian police drove off the protesters, some chanting "Down with USA terror" and "Kill the Albanians," and firefighters brought the blaze under control. A charred body, which U.S. officials said was probably that of a protester, was found in the embassy.
WORLD
February 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
NATO peacekeepers reopened two demolished border checkpoints between Serbia and northern Kosovo on Wednesday as thousands of Serbs protested Kosovo's independence. For three days, Kosovo's Serbs have shown their anger over Sunday's declaration of independence by the ethnic Albanian leadership, destroying United Nations and NATO property, setting off small bombs and staging noisy rallies.
WORLD
February 19, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of Serbs rallied Monday in this tense, divided town and vowed never to let go of a region that they, like ethnic Albanians, consider their homeland. For all the heated rhetoric unleashed as world powers slowly started recognizing an independent nation called Kosovo, it seemed unlikely that large-scale violence would erupt.
WORLD
January 21, 2008 | Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson, Special to The Times
A hard-line nationalist edged out more moderate rivals in the first round of Serbia's presidential election Sunday, a contest that many see as a referendum on the troubled country's relationship with Europe. A near-record turnout gave Tomislav Nikolic, deputy head of the Serbian Radical Party, about 39% of the vote, according to preliminary results with most of the votes counted. He will face incumbent President Boris Tadic in a runoff Feb. 3.
WORLD
January 19, 2008 | Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson, Special to The Times
Serbs will choose between sharply competing visions of their nation when they vote for a president this weekend, an election that could determine the stability of the Balkan region for the foreseeable future. The next president will face the all-but-certain loss of Kosovo, a rebellious province dominated by ethnic Albanians whose bid for independence is supported by Washington.
WORLD
January 13, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
To a muddy field lashed by razor-sharp winds, about 50 brave Serbs have come home. Their houses here on the edge of an ethnic Albanian town have been repaired, or new ones built. A few rows of wheat and corn have been planted. But there are no jobs, no school, and danger lurks. Graffiti from shadowy anti-Serb militias scar the walls of nearby buildings.
WORLD
December 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A former Bosnian Serb general was convicted Wednesday of orchestrating months of deadly shelling and sniping during the siege of Sarajevo in 1994 and 1995 and was sentenced to 33 years in prison. The siege by troops under Gen. Dragomir Milosevic killed more than 10,000 civilians with a hail of bullets and mortar shells. "There was no safe place in Sarajevo," said Presiding Judge Patrick Robinson, reading from the judgment at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.
SPORTS
September 7, 2007 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Spanish-speaking tennis players have been lined up like dominoes against Novak Djokovic, and they have been flipped over, one by one, since the Serb escaped from his second-round thriller against Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic at the U.S. Open. There was Juan Martin Del Porto of Argentina, followed by Juan Monaco of Argentina, and on Thursday night, 31-year-old Carlos Moya of Spain.
SPORTS
August 13, 2007 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Childhood hide-and-seek competitors turned into delightful co-conspirators Sunday, completing a Serb-style North American tennis sweep hours apart. Daydream believing turned into reality for Novak Djokovic and Ana Ivanovic. First, the 20-year-old Djokovic upset No. 1-ranked Roger Federer in the men's Montreal final in three sets. The next move was up to 19-year-old Ivanovic, who was armed with the information of her countryman's win.
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