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Seret Scott

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November 1, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Seret Scott first encountered August Wilson more than 15 years ago, "he wasn't really August Wilson. He was just August Wilson." Now he is one of America's most acclaimed playwrights, and Scott is directing South Coast Repertory's staging of "The Piano Lesson," one of his two Pulitzer Prize-winning dramas. When they met, Wilson was an unproduced playwright trying to refine "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" at a noted playwrights' workshop at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Connecticut.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Seret Scott first encountered August Wilson more than 15 years ago, "he wasn't really August Wilson. He was just August Wilson." Now he is one of America's most acclaimed playwrights, and Scott is directing South Coast Repertory's staging of "The Piano Lesson," one of his two Pulitzer Prize-winning dramas. When they met, Wilson was an unproduced playwright trying to refine "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" at a noted playwrights' workshop at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Connecticut.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1999
Theater Sandra Tsing Loh, a product of a Chinese German household, delivers a comic solo show on her family dynamics and her own coming of age in "Aliens in America," closing Sunday at the Tiffany Theater, 8532 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. Today-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 and 7 p.m. $25 to $34.50. (310) 289-2999.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Dr. Endesha Ida Mae Holland's approach to civil rights and self-determination is as unexpected as snow in July. Most of the other 20th-Century African-American women who have loudly proclaimed their place in the world--Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker--have had their share of quirky stories to tell. But Holland's rise from the real and figurative mud of her native Greenwood, Miss., into enlightenment was through the longest and darkest tunnel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A second encounter with August Wilson's "The Piano Lesson" reminds you, foremost and happily, of how Wilson's richest language has enlivened the American stage. The richness comes with some excess baggage. Like other plays Wilson has written, before and after rising to national prominence with the 1984 Broadway premiere of "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," "The Piano Lesson" can be accused of reiterative generosity, let's say. It is longish, three hours in all.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Crumbs From the Table of Joy" is a coming-of-age drama from a young playwright who has not yet come of age. Though she tells a lively story with specificity and a nice dab of surprise, Lynn Nottage tips her hand by overwriting. Innocent of boring the audience at South Coast Repertory, she is guilty of being pleased with the sound of her own sentences. "Please don't embarrass me with your articulation of regret," is the language of argument in the Crump household, Brooklyn, 1950.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
In August Wilson's plays, language is action. That might seem a paradox, but consider what occurs in "Two Trains Running," his civil rights era drama set in a Pittsburgh diner. Long stretches of the story involve little more than characters sitting around talking, but their conversation churns with ideas -- momentous ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO--He's long-winded. She's long-suffering. And the neutral party in the middle of their marital strife has broken his own rule about not getting emotionally involved. "Faith Healer," the 1979 Brian Friel play that opened Saturday at the Globe Theatres' Cassius Carter Centre Stage, tells the tale of a traveling Irish faith healer, "Fantastic" Francis (Frank) Hardy; his neurotic-heroic wife, Grace; and Hardy's Cockney manager, Teddy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2000 | DON BRAUNAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Trojan Women," at its best, is a tough grind for cast and audience. And the Old Globe's new version, at the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre, is not "Trojan Women" at its best. Euripides' 2,400-year-old war protest, believed written to censure his native Greece's aggression on neighboring islands, is an almost-unrelieved litany of misery and atrocity after the Greek conquest of Troy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | Don Braunagel, Special to The Times
Dealing with an aging parent is difficult, and doubly so when the parent-child connection has frayed. That's the central situation in "Knowing Cairo," Andrea Stolowitz's heartbreaking new play on the Globe Theatres' Cassius Carter stage. Rose is 79, living alone in her New York apartment and daily growing more cantankerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Madame Mao's Memories," now playing at the Old Globe's Cassius Carter Centre Stage, makes you appreciate the artistry of "Evita." Both shows are true stories about former actresses who rose to the heights of power through the use of sexual favors, who inspired passionate admiration and abject fear. But "Evita" was far more satisfying and not just for being a full-blown musical with all the flashy Andrew Lloyd Webber trimmings.
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