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Serge D Elia

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BUSINESS
October 18, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court has thrown out an unprecedented lower court ruling that had allowed a woman to sue her former husband for securities fraud for deceiving her in divorce court about the value of their stock holdings. The three-judge Court of Appeal panel overturned a $10.2-million verdict that Sally d'Elia of Costa Mesa had won against her former husband, Serge d'Elia, a co-founder of sneaker maker Vans Inc. But the court in Santa Ana upheld a $3.9-million judgment on three other claims.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court has thrown out an unprecedented lower court ruling that had allowed a woman to sue her former husband for securities fraud for deceiving her in divorce court about the value of their stock holdings. The three-judge Court of Appeal panel overturned a $10.2-million verdict that Sally d'Elia of Costa Mesa had won against her former husband, Serge d'Elia, a co-founder of sneaker maker Vans Inc. But the court in Santa Ana upheld a $3.9-million judgment on three other claims.
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NEWS
June 5, 1993 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the founders of sneaker manufacturer Vans Inc. should pay his ex-wife half the $22 million he made on the sale of his company stock, a judge said Friday, after telling her when they divorced that the stock was worth only $1 million. Serge and Sally d'Elia divorced in July, 1986, after what her lawyers said was 22 years of marriage. As part of the settlement, he gave her $500,000--half the $1 million he told her his one-third ownership in Vans was worth.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1988 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
The maker of Vans casual sneakers, Van Doren Rubber Co. in Orange, has been sold for $70 million to a venture capital firm in Menlo Park. McCown De Leeuw & Co. plans few changes for Van Doren, which was founded in 1966 and made more than 2 million shoes at its plant in Orange last year, according to Luis Solis, a senior associate of McCown. Van Doren was one of the last family-owned, domestic manufacturers of shoes in the $2.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1985 | JAMES GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Van Doren Rubber Co., the Orange County maker of the Vans sneakers popularized nationally in a 1982 Hollywood movie, will emerge from nearly 14 months in U. S. Bankruptcy Court on Dec. 20, with a reorganization plan that will pay about $12 million to its creditors over the next four years. The plan, proposed in August and approved by the Bankruptcy Court in Santa Ana on Monday, will repay all creditors the full $9.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Paul Van Doren thinks leveraged buyouts are as American as hot dogs, apple pie and sneakers. In fact, he was pleased when Van Doren Rubber Co., the Orange-based tennis shoe company that he founded 23 years ago, was taken over in a leveraged buyout arranged by McCown De Leeuw & Co., a San Francisco venture-banking firm. In Van Doren's view, LBOs don't deserve the black eye they have received in recent years.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Word that Vans Inc. will close its massive manufacturing plant in Orange was more than just bad news for Sylvia Garibay. It was a family crisis. Not only will Garibay, a 17-year production line veteran, lose her job, but so will four of her sisters, each of whom has spent more than a decade in the aging and dusty factory permeated by the smell of adhesives and rubber products.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Paul Van Doren thinks leveraged buyouts are as American as hot dogs, apple pie and sneakers. In fact, he was pleased when Van Doren Rubber Co., the Orange-based tennis shoe company that he founded 23 years ago, was taken over in a leveraged buyout arranged by McCown De Leeuw & Co., a San Francisco venture-banking firm. In Van Doren's view, leveraged buyouts don't deserve the black eye they have received in recent years.
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