Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSergeant
IN THE NEWS

Sergeant

NATIONAL
April 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A Florida police shooting instructor has been fired for using a target resembling slain teen Trayvon Martin that he said was meant to be a teaching aid. Port Canaveral Police Sgt. Ron King blamed his termination on city officials' "lies, false information and political agendas,” according to a YouTube video he posted Saturday . "Others are accusing me of doing something that I just plain did not do," King says in the video. He says the targets were meant to train officers to  not  shoot at someone like Martin.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
March 16, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. - In Afghanistan, Tonya Long, a 13-year Army veteran, approved military cash payments to Afghan drivers of "jingle trucks," the colorful transport trucks that carry supplies to U.S. bases. Last week, Staff Sgt. Long stood in the dock in a federal courtroom here and read aloud from a statement she had written on notebook paper: "I cannot express how sorry I am … I chose to betray my country and my family. " She did not ask for mercy, she told a judge, "because I don't deserve it. " Long, 30, had pleaded guilty to stealing at least $1 million and shipping the cash in hundred-dollar bills to the U.S. in the guts of hollowed-out VCR players.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
It was nearing midnight when Terie Evans called police in Irvine with a hunch: An ex-Los Angeles police officer named Christopher Dorner might have killed a young Irvine woman and her fiance a few days earlier. Evans, an LAPD sergeant who had trained Dorner, conceded that her theory was a long shot. But Dorner's name had suddenly surfaced the day before in a strange phone call. And she knew he had a connection to the woman who had been killed. It seemed too much to dismiss as a coincidence.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In another life, William Fulton was "Drop Zone Bill," a bounty hunter who ran a military surplus store in Anchorage. You need a tactical vest? A bayonet that would clip neatly onto an M-4? Bill Fulton was your man. "We do bad things to bad people," his company jackets said. Fulton was also a go-to guy for Republican politicians who occasionally needed to reach out to the far right fringes of the party - those who spent weekends in the woods in camo gear and considered the 2nd Amendment an expression of divine intent.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - A military judge has ruled that defense examiners can utilize hypnosis to help Army Sgt. John Russell penetrate the haze of amnesia he says prevents him from remembering the day he allegedly killed five fellow service members at a mental health clinic in Iraq. Monday's ruling is a boost for the defense, which hopes to show that Russell should not face the death penalty because he was suffering from a mental breakdown brought on by longstanding depression, mental illness and Army psychiatrists who allegedly taunted him instead of treating him. Judge David L. Conn also authorized the defense to hire an expert to conduct tests for signs of physical brain damage, but ruled that defense lawyers hadn't shown they need additional experts to analyze whether there were deficiencies in the psychiatric care that Russell received at the hands of Army doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A self-described "meat and potatoes" conservative, Tony Ruiz often argued politics with his son. They clashed over perceptions of Islam after the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi was overrun. But Tony said his son, Clinton, made some good points. "He drew a very clear distinction between Muslim radicals and the Islam religion," Tony said. "It actually did convince me. " He is still convinced, a month after his son, Sgt. Clinton K. Ruiz , was killed by small-arms fire in Afghanistan, serving a tour as a psychological operations specialist with the 9th Military Information Support Battalion, 8th Military Information Support Group.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS McCHORD, Wash. - Attorneys for Sgt. John Russell asked a military judge Monday for permission to hire an expert in hypnosis to help the veteran of three combat tours remember what happened on the day he is alleged to have shot and killed five fellow soldiers at a combat stress clinic in Iraq. The defense also hopes to contract with a brain imaging expert to measure signs of atrophy detected in the 48-year-old sergeant's brain to determine whether a previous brain injury could have impeded his ability to control his impulses on May 9, 2011, when Russell is accused of grabbing a colleague's gun, returning to the clinic and opening fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
After a violent confrontation with a teenage suspect, a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy took a photo of the man's bloodied face and texted it to Sgt. Eric Gonzalez, a friend who worked at Men's Central Jail. A few hours later, Gonzalez responded by sending his own photo of a battered suspect: a jail visitor who had been kicked, punched and pepper-sprayed by deputies. The man in Gonzalez's photo had two black eyes, one swollen shut, and blood streaming down his face. FULL COVERAGE: Jails under scrutiny "Looks like we did a better job," Gonzalez wrote his colleague.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Military prosecutors Wednesday painted a picture of increasing frustration for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales - passed over for promotion at work, unhappy with his family - in the weeks before he allegedly killed 16 civilians in a middle-of-the-night shooting rampage in southern Afghanistan. Questioning one of Bales' closest Army friends, 1st Sgt. Vernon Bigham, prosecutor Lt. Col. Joseph Morse repeatedly asked about Bales' expressions of unhappiness about much of his life, including the strict rules of engagement that prevented his unit from being "aggressive" with Afghans and his strong belief that he should have been promoted to sergeant first class just before the March 11 killings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
A Bell police sergeant who said he was forced into retirement in retaliation for reporting corruption in the city has received $400,000 and been reinstated to the force. The size of the settlement of James Corcoran's whistle-blower lawsuit is far less than what he might have received at trial, experts agreed. Retired U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian, who served as mediator, said Bell could have lost more than $3 million if the case had gone to trial, according to a memo that City Atty.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|