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Sergei B Stankevich

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NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
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NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
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NEWS
January 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fear and anger swept the Soviet Union on Sunday as people learned of the army's bloody clash with Lithuanian nationalists, and thousands protested in rallies against what they called an impending dictatorship. "We are witnessing the establishment of a dictatorship by the most reactionary circles of our society," Yuri N. Afanasyev, a historian and radical member of the Congress of People's Deputies, told a crowd of 3,000 gathered outside the Kremlin.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet capital will need foreign food aid at least until spring, and its milk supplies are currently so bad that dairy-based baby foods can be provided only for sick children, Moscow officials said Saturday. Deputy Mayor Sergei B. Stankevich, asserting that "this help is very necessary," said that Moscow had received 14 shipments of aid totaling 200 tons as of Friday and that a special committee for distributing the foreign food and medicine has been working around the clock for three days.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, seeking to propel the Soviet Union into full-scale economic reforms, declared Tuesday that his republic, the country's wealthiest, will stop financing central government ministries and state-owned enterprises it regards as unnecessary or uneconomic. Yeltsin also said that Russia, worried about the drain by other republics on its resources, will soon issue its own currency and pursue what increasingly is emerging as a "Russia first" policy.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorial to the millions killed or imprisoned during the political repressions of past Soviet regimes was unveiled Tuesday in the shadow of the building where many of them had been tortured and murdered. Thousands of people carrying flowers and photographs of victims marched passed Lubyanka, the central building of the KGB, the Soviet state security and espionage agency.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from top Soviet government and Communist Party officials, Moscow city authorities agreed Wednesday to permit a weeklong international Jewish film festival despite their earlier fears that the festival might bring anti-Semitic demonstrations. Reversing their previous decision, the city authorities said that "the political situation in the city . . . was less complicated" and that security could be provided for those attending the festival, scheduled to begin Saturday.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of demonstrators, protesting severe shortages of food and consumer goods, marched to the Kremlin on Sunday to demand that Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov resign and a new government be appointed to carry out radical economic reforms. Chanting "Ryzhkov, resign!"
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summing up the efforts of the Soviet Communist Party to reinvent itself, one skeptic said all he and his almost 4,700 comrades at the party congress have been doing is pouring "new gasoline into an old engine." A leading Soviet reformer, Moscow Deputy Mayor Sergei B. Stankevich, said the Communists meeting in the Kremlin seem as oblivious to impending doom as passengers on the Titanic arguing over what music the orchestra should play.
OPINION
October 7, 1990 | Mikhail Berger, Mikhail Berger is the economics observer of Izvestia
Whether Nikolai I. Ryzhkov's government should resign has long ceased to be a subject of behind-the-scenes whispers or parliamentary debate. Coal miners and street demonstrators have recently demanded nothing less than his speedy retirement as prime minister. The Soviet Parliament, as well, has voted no confidence in Ryzhkov's performance. How, then, does his government manage to cling to power despite these tough, and occasionally uncompromising, demands?
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin won half a victory in his battle to bring the entire government bureaucracy of the vast republic under his control when lawmakers on Thursday backed away from their demand for full local and regional elections in December. After nearly two weeks of quarreling, the Russian Supreme Soviet voted, 156 to 16, for a compromise that requires the election of local officials but allows Yeltsin to set the date for the elections.
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