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Sergei F Akhromeyev

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NEWS
July 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
The former chief of the general staff of the Soviet military will testify next week before the House Armed Services Committee, chairman Les Aspin said Friday. Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev will be questioned July 21 about arms control, the Soviet military budget and military cuts announced by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Wisconsin Democrat said in a statement.
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NEWS
August 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking pace of change in the Soviet Union continued unabated Sunday as the defense minister announced plans for an 80% shake-up of the military leadership, and the Communist Party hierarchy, just as discredited by the right-wing coup, agreed to abolish its nucleus, the Central Committee. Appearing on evening TV news, Col. Gen. Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov said his Defense Ministry--one of the hotbeds of support for last week's abortive bid to overthrow President Mikhail S.
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NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, a top military adviser to President Mikhail A. Gorbachev, said Friday that the Soviet Union will come up with a way to combat the B-2 bomber if the U.S. produces the radar-evading aircraft. Akhromeyev, who capped a visit to the United States by meeting with President Bush in the Oval Office, also told the National Press Club that East European nations are free to "become the kind of nations they wish to become."
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For retired Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, news of the suicide of Soviet Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev carried a special sadness. Crowe, living in retirement in suburban Virginia, recalled Sunday how he and Akhromeyev had developed an unusual friendship that began with the Soviet officer's first visit to the United States four years ago for the signing of a treaty eliminating U.S. and Soviet medium-range nuclear missiles.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For retired Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, news of the suicide of Soviet Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev carried a special sadness. Crowe, living in retirement in suburban Virginia, recalled Sunday how he and Akhromeyev had developed an unusual friendship that began with the Soviet officer's first visit to the United States four years ago for the signing of a treaty eliminating U.S. and Soviet medium-range nuclear missiles.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The highest-ranking Soviet official ever to appear before Congress warned Friday that Moscow fears the United States still seeks military superiority over the Soviet Union with its so-called "Star Wars" program and its refusal to negotiate reductions in naval strength. In an appearance before the House Armed Services Committee, Soviet Marshal Sergei F.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking pace of change in the Soviet Union continued unabated Sunday as the defense minister announced plans for an 80% shake-up of the military leadership, and the Communist Party hierarchy, just as discredited by the right-wing coup, agreed to abolish its nucleus, the Central Committee. Appearing on evening TV news, Col. Gen. Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov said his Defense Ministry--one of the hotbeds of support for last week's abortive bid to overthrow President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a dramatic move to give new momentum to long-stalled arms negotiations, announced Wednesday that the Soviet Union will unilaterally reduce its armed forces by half a million men and withdraw thousands of troops and tanks from Eastern Europe. Gorbachev, addressing the U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | From Reuters
The chief of staff of the Soviet armed forces, Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, will pay an official visit to the United States in the first half of July, Tass news agency reported Sunday.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's top military officer, Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, met with Cuban President Fidel Castro and discussed military collaboration, the official daily newspaper Granma said Wednesday. Without providing details on the Tuesday talks, attended by Raul Castro, the Cuban defense minister, the newspaper said they took place "in a friendly atmosphere, as befit the relations between the two countries."
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, a top military adviser to President Mikhail A. Gorbachev, said Friday that the Soviet Union will come up with a way to combat the B-2 bomber if the U.S. produces the radar-evading aircraft. Akhromeyev, who capped a visit to the United States by meeting with President Bush in the Oval Office, also told the National Press Club that East European nations are free to "become the kind of nations they wish to become."
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The highest-ranking Soviet official ever to appear before Congress warned Friday that Moscow fears the United States still seeks military superiority over the Soviet Union with its so-called "Star Wars" program and its refusal to negotiate reductions in naval strength. In an appearance before the House Armed Services Committee, Soviet Marshal Sergei F.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
The former chief of the general staff of the Soviet military will testify next week before the House Armed Services Committee, chairman Les Aspin said Friday. Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev will be questioned July 21 about arms control, the Soviet military budget and military cuts announced by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Wisconsin Democrat said in a statement.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a dramatic move to give new momentum to long-stalled arms negotiations, announced Wednesday that the Soviet Union will unilaterally reduce its armed forces by half a million men and withdraw thousands of troops and tanks from Eastern Europe. Gorbachev, addressing the U.N.
NEWS
April 15, 1986
The Soviet chief of staff, Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, confirmed that Moscow intends to resume nuclear testing after a U.S. blast in the Nevada desert last week. He told a news conference that the Soviets' eight-month-long, unilateral testing hiatus, formally ended last Friday, had caused a certain setback to Soviet military power. But he added: "The political gains in the struggle for a halt to nuclear testing . . . were greater than the purely military setback we suffered."
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