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Sergei Kirov

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April 13, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Sergei Kirov never had the cabbage dumplings he asked his wife to make for dinner that December night. Instead, the Communist Party chief of Leningrad was assassinated before he could go home to a late supper, thus becoming a historical conundrum that haunts today's brave new world of glasnost and perestroika in the Soviet Union. Now, almost 54 years after he was gunned down in suspicious circumstances at the city's party headquarters, Kirov is a particularly compelling ghost.
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NEWS
April 13, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Sergei Kirov never had the cabbage dumplings he asked his wife to make for dinner that December night. Instead, the Communist Party chief of Leningrad was assassinated before he could go home to a late supper, thus becoming a historical conundrum that haunts today's brave new world of glasnost and perestroika in the Soviet Union. Now, almost 54 years after he was gunned down in suspicious circumstances at the city's party headquarters, Kirov is a particularly compelling ghost.
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NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Reuters
Vladimir Kryuchkov, head of the KGB security police, said Friday that 4.2 million people were victims of political purges in the Soviet Union between 1920 and 1953. Two million were killed or imprisoned in 1937 and 1938, when dictator Josef Stalin's campaign of terror was at it height, Kryuchkov said.
BOOKS
May 22, 1988 | Garry Abrams, Abrams is a Times staff writer.
If there were such a thing as original sin in the Soviet Union, it might be the murder of Sergei Kirov at Communist Party headquarters in Leningrad on Dec. 1, 1934. From this murder, many historians assert, flowed the purges of old Bolsheviks, of the military and of as many as 10 million Soviet citizens in the late 1930s. From it grew the permanent apparatus of terror that made the Soviet Union what it is today. In this vein, Adam B.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1994 | Julian More, More, who lives in France, is the author of eight books, most recently "A Taste of Burgundy" (Abbeville Press). He is working on his next book, "Pagnol's Provence."
Peter the Great loved water. He learned to sail at the age of 12; he studied navigation and shipbuilding; he even worked in the shipyards of Amsterdam--after he had become czar. He also built the first Russian navy and commanded ships in successful sea battles against the Turks and Swedes. And in 1703, on the Neva River delta, he founded the great, lovely, canal-laced seaport of St. Petersburg, which became known as "the Venice of the North." St.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adam Bruno Ulam, one of the world's most respected experts on Russia and the Soviet Union who wrote 18 books, taught such students as Robert F. Kennedy and Henry Kissinger at Harvard's Russian Research Center and advised several American presidents on foreign policy, has died. He was 77. Ulam, who was on the Harvard faculty from 1947 until his retirement in 1992, died Tuesday in Cambridge, Mass., after a long illness, his family announced through university officials.
BOOKS
May 22, 1988 | Olga Andrey Carlisle, Carlisle, who writes frequently on Russian cultural subjects, is the editor of "Visions" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich), a collection of short stories by Leonid Andreyev.
It may well be that the enormity of a modern tyrant's crimes can only be expressed through metaphor. Not long ago, the Soviet Georgian film maker, Tengiz Abuladze, did this in his surrealistic film "Repentance." Reading Anatoli Rybakov's "Children of the Arbat," which traces for nearly 700 pages a dozen Soviet destinies carefully observed and skillfully interwoven, we long for metaphors that would do justice to the memory of the millions who died at Joseph Stalin's hands.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition.
The Kirov Ballet of Leningrad traces its history back to 1738. But the company Orange County will see, Tuesday through May 24 at the Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, is "quite new," even newer than what audiences saw when the company was here in 1989. "There are new stars, a new corps de ballet, a lot of new people, and then there is new repertoire," says company artistic director Oleg Vinogradov.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The murder of the Soviet party chief in Leningrad, Sergei Kirov, on Dec. 1, 1934, led to one of the great crimes of modern history, Joseph Stalin's reign of terror in the Soviet Union that left enormous numbers dead, several million imprisoned in the grim labor camps and a vast nation numbed by fear into silence. "Who Killed Kirov?" asks the question that was on the minds of many Soviets from the very beginning.
OPINION
February 19, 2006 | Robert Conquest, ROBERT CONQUEST, a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution, is the author of many books on Stalin and Russia, including "The Great Terror," "The Harvest of Sorrow" and "Stalin and the Kirov Murder."
WHEN NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV took the podium on the final day of the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, the speech he gave was so surprising and unexpected that some members of the audience actually fainted. It was Feb. 25, 1956, three years after the death of Josef Stalin and Khrushchev's accession as first secretary of the party. Although the speech was made in closed session, and has been known forever after as the "secret speech," it did not remain secret for long.
TRAVEL
March 17, 1991 | CHARLES JACOBS, Jacobs is a free-lance writer living in Woodcliff Lake, N.J.
Three centuries before Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev fought to open his nation to certain Western political ideas, Czar Peter the Great changed the course of Russian history by reaching beyond the borders of that huge landmass to assimilate Western economics, technology and culture. So a trip through the Russia of Peter the Great can be a helpful experience in understanding the dynamics of what is happening to the Soviets today.
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