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Sergei Krikalev

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NEWS
April 13, 1989
The orbiting Soviet space station Mir will stay in mothballs for three months because of delays in preparing equipment that cosmonauts need to perform experiments aboard the spacecraft, Soviet news reports said. Cosmonauts Alexander Volkov, Sergei Krikalev and Valery Polyakov will return to Earth on April 27, leaving the Mir station unmanned for only the second time since it was launched in February, 1986. "The facility will be left unmanned . . . due to delays with the preparation of two research modules" that will be attached to the main craft, Deputy Flight Director Viktor Blagov told the Tass news agency.
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NEWS
October 31, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first crew of what has been called the most ambitious international science project ever attempted, the $60-billion International Space Station, blasted off on its four-month mission today from this frigid Russian base in the wastes of Kazakhstan. From the same pad used by the first Sputnik in 1957 and Russian cosmonaut Yuri A.
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NEWS
March 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev needed smelling salts after returning to Earth on Wednesday. Not only were his legs wobbly from his 10-month space mission, but he also had to cope with 10 months' worth of dizzying political upheaval that took place in his homeland while he was away.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev needed smelling salts after returning to Earth on Wednesday. Not only were his legs wobbly from his 10-month space mission, but he also had to cope with 10 months' worth of dizzying political upheaval that took place in his homeland while he was away.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Unless you have completely tired of hard-luck stories from the former Soviet Union, spare a thought for the plight of Cosmonaut 3rd Class Sergei Krikalev. Blasted into space more than 265 days ago by a country that no longer exists, Krikalev is now wondering when the successor states to the communist superpower will arrange his long-delayed return home.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first crew of what has been called the most ambitious international science project ever attempted, the $60-billion International Space Station, blasted off on its four-month mission today from this frigid Russian base in the wastes of Kazakhstan. From the same pad used by the first Sputnik in 1957 and Russian cosmonaut Yuri A.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above Earth, the Rip van Winkle of the Space Age said Friday he's greatly looking forward to coming home next week. And like Rip, he said it could take time for him to wake up to a new world. Speaking from orbit, former Soviet cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev told reporters that he is in "high spirits" and laughed at rumors that he has fits of depression.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev on Tuesday broke the record for the most time spent in space. Krikalev, who is scheduled to remain aboard the International Space Station until October, passed the previous record of 747 days, 14 hours, held by fellow Russian Sergei Avdeyev. Krikalev's 20-year career has included stints on the Soviet Mir space station, U.S. space shuttle and Russian Soyuz spacecraft.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | Reuters
Cosmonauts from the former Soviet Union left their orbiting Mir station Thursday for a spacewalk to clean external video cameras and perform routine maintenance before next month's return to Earth. Commonwealth Television said cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Alexander Volkov cleaned special camera lenses and collected old solar batteries and other gear.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Three Soviet cosmonauts aboard the orbiting space station Mir voted in the parliamentary election Sunday but without a secret ballot. The official news agency Tass said that Alexander Volkov, Sergei Krikalev and Valery Polyakov had announced their choice of candidates during a regular communications session with ground control. The cosmonauts' votes were then passed to the election commission for inclusion in the final count.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above Earth, the Rip van Winkle of the Space Age said Friday he's greatly looking forward to coming home next week. And like Rip, he said it could take time for him to wake up to a new world. Speaking from orbit, former Soviet cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev told reporters that he is in "high spirits" and laughed at rumors that he has fits of depression.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Unless you have completely tired of hard-luck stories from the former Soviet Union, spare a thought for the plight of Cosmonaut 3rd Class Sergei Krikalev. Blasted into space more than 265 days ago by a country that no longer exists, Krikalev is now wondering when the successor states to the communist superpower will arrange his long-delayed return home.
NEWS
April 13, 1989
The orbiting Soviet space station Mir will stay in mothballs for three months because of delays in preparing equipment that cosmonauts need to perform experiments aboard the spacecraft, Soviet news reports said. Cosmonauts Alexander Volkov, Sergei Krikalev and Valery Polyakov will return to Earth on April 27, leaving the Mir station unmanned for only the second time since it was launched in February, 1986. "The facility will be left unmanned . . . due to delays with the preparation of two research modules" that will be attached to the main craft, Deputy Flight Director Viktor Blagov told the Tass news agency.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The two residents of the International Space Station floated outside and collected a nearly life-size radiation-measuring doll and other science experiments from the exterior of their orbiting home, officials at Cape Canaveral said. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev and astronaut John Phillips left the space station vacant to accomplish the job, with flight controllers keeping watch over the station systems from the ground.
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