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NEWS
May 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said Monday. Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M.
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NEWS
May 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said Monday. Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M.
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NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergei M. Shakhrai, the deputy prime minister who first heard from reporters that he was being stripped of one of his posts, resigned on Tuesday from a Russian Cabinet that seems to be reshuffled almost as often as Italy's governments. Only 11 of the 25 ministers as of April, 1992, still hold Cabinet-level posts today. If Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin accepts his resignation, Shakhrai will become the fifth minister to depart in the past five months.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began trying to cash in Tuesday on his referendum victory, launching a sales campaign for a new constitution that would shore up his presidency and do away with the hostile Congress of People's Deputies. Yeltsin also showed a new willingness to ignore nationalist lawmakers when he issued a tough statement warning Bosnian Serbs that Russia will not stand by them if they continue to reject international peace plans.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Told that their rashness had endangered Russia's unity, lawmakers caved in to enormous pressure from President Boris N. Yeltsin and agreed Friday to give their homeland not just one but two names: "Russian Federation" and "Russia." Less than 24 hours earlier, the Congress of People's Deputies had been swept by a nearly unanimous spasm of patriotic fervor that led members to choose only "Russia."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1993 | YURI KARASH, Yuri Karash has a Ph.D. from the Russian Academy of Science. He is working on his second doctorate at American University. and
Russia's parliamentary elections Sunday will determine the political life of the country for the next two years. What shape that takes will depend on the distribution of power among the three principal electoral blocs: Russia's Choice, led by Yegor T. Gaidar; Party of the Russian Unity and Accord, led by Sergei M. Shakhrai, and a third bloc, led by Grigory A. Yavlinsky, Yuri Y. Boldyrev and Vladimir P. Lukin. What is the goal of each of these blocs?
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What appeared at first to be an assassination attempt tied to the politically explosive trial of the Communist Party turned out Monday to have been merely the misadventure of a drunken Russian barber. Alexei Smirnov, the 27-year-old director of a Moscow hair salon, confessed to police that he was the culprit whose small blue sedan had barreled into the car carrying Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's chief lawyer, the Interfax news agency reported.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin rode to his own political rescue once again on Friday, appeasing his enemies in Parliament with a promise that he would soon resign as prime minister and proudly accepting credit for keeping Russia from splitting apart. After sitting, stone-faced, for more than two days as conservative lawmakers of the Russian Congress of People's Deputies savaged his government and policies, Yeltsin swung suddenly into action Friday and delivered a one-two punch.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent reaction to NATO's expansion plans, Russia said Monday that it is urging Belarus to take new steps toward a union of the two former Soviet republics. The two Slavic neighbors signed a union treaty in April at the initiative of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, but the goal of political and economic integration was shelved in Moscow after Yeltsin's reelection in July. Now the Russian leader has revived the idea in a letter urging his Belarussian counterpart, Alexander G.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin defeated--but just barely--a proposal to hold a vote of no confidence in his government as a crucial session of Parliament opened Monday. But he is still expected to face new barrages of lawmakers' wrath today when he reports on the foundering economy. In a 447 to 412 vote, the Russian Congress of People's Deputies turned down a proposal to add to its nine-day agenda a vote of no confidence in the government.
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