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Sergei Magnitsky

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WORLD
March 19, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russian investigators found no evidence of violence against a lawyer who died in custody after accusing officials and police officers of running a multimillion-dollar tax refund scam, and have ended their probe, officials said Tuesday. Sergei Magnitsky, who worked as a legal advisor for the Hermitage Capital Management investment fund in Moscow, died in 2009 of heart insufficiency and brain and lung edema resulting from diabetes and hepatitis while in pretrial detention on tax charges, the Russian Investigative Committee said on its website.
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WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday called for closer cooperation between the United States and his nation in combating terrorism. Answering questions during an almost five-hour annual call-in show broadcast live on Russian television, Putin started by rebuking the West for what he views as a double-standard in its approach to international terrorism. “It always made me indignant when terrorists who committed atrocious -- bloody, ghoulish crimes on the territory of our country -- were called nothing but rebels by our Western partners and even your colleagues from Western mass media,” he said.
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WORLD
November 17, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian officials are promising a tough response to U.S. legislation that would impose sanctions on Russian officials if Congress finds them responsible for violating human rights. The U.S. House on Friday passed a bill that establishes permanent normal trade relations with Russia, repealing the 1974 Jackson-Vanik amendment, which had imposed limits on trade because of the Soviet Union's treatment of Jews. It had been waived annually since 1989, two years before the Soviet Union collapsed.
WORLD
April 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday began a U.S.-Russian youth hockey game opening the world championship competition by declaring a minute of silence for the casualties of the Boston bombings and the West, Texas, explosion. “In recent days, terrible tragedies that claimed lives happened in the country from which the team of our competitors today came: the terrorist act in Boston and the explosion at a Texas plant,” Putin said in televised remarks in the southern city of Sochi.
WORLD
April 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday began a U.S.-Russian youth hockey game opening the world championship competition by declaring a minute of silence for the casualties of the Boston bombings and the West, Texas, explosion. “In recent days, terrible tragedies that claimed lives happened in the country from which the team of our competitors today came: the terrorist act in Boston and the explosion at a Texas plant,” Putin said in televised remarks in the southern city of Sochi.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday called for closer cooperation between the United States and his nation in combating terrorism. Answering questions during an almost five-hour annual call-in show broadcast live on Russian television, Putin started by rebuking the West for what he views as a double-standard in its approach to international terrorism. “It always made me indignant when terrorists who committed atrocious -- bloody, ghoulish crimes on the territory of our country -- were called nothing but rebels by our Western partners and even your colleagues from Western mass media,” he said.
WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - The Russian parliament's lower house Friday gave initial approval to a bill that would impose sanctions on U.S. citizens accused of human rights violations. The bill, which does not specify the kinds of violations that would apply, was named for Dima Yakovlev, a boy who was adopted and died of heatstroke after his American father left him in a parked car for hours four years ago in Virginia. It is expected to receive full parliamentary approval this month and become effective Jan. 1. The vote by Russian legislators came as President Obama on Friday signed a bill into law that helps increase U.S. business opportunities in Russia, but calls for punishment of Russians accused of human rights violations.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - After months of delays, U.S. lawmakers finally passed a trade bill with Russia. And perhaps no one was as deeply moved as investor William Browder. His emotions had nothing to do with the commercial implications of the legislation, which normalizes trade relations with Russia and should give a boost to big American exporters such as Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Instead, Browder's focus was entirely on a provision that would punish Russians accused of human rights abuses, specifically those involved in the 2009 death of his onetime Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky.
WORLD
April 13, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian officials Saturday banned 18 American officials from entering the country, a day after the U.S. announced similar sanctions on 18 Russians in connection with the prosecution and subsequent death of Russian auditor Sergei Magnitsky. The auditor's death in custody in 2009, after allegedly blowing the whistle on a multimillion-dollar scam, led to passage of a law calling for visa restrictions and financial sanctions for those involved. The American list published Friday included Russian police officers, tax inspectors and other officials, most of whom were involved with the Magnitsky case.
WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament took a first step Wednesday toward banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents, a move intended as retaliation for an anti-corruption law recently passed by Congress. The State Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted 399 to 17 in favor of a bill that included the ban and also would annul an adoption agreement between the two countries that Russia ratified in July. The measure still has to be approved by the upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, who has sent mixed signals about his support.
WORLD
April 13, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian officials Saturday banned 18 American officials from entering the country, a day after the U.S. announced similar sanctions on 18 Russians in connection with the prosecution and subsequent death of Russian auditor Sergei Magnitsky. The auditor's death in custody in 2009, after allegedly blowing the whistle on a multimillion-dollar scam, led to passage of a law calling for visa restrictions and financial sanctions for those involved. The American list published Friday included Russian police officers, tax inspectors and other officials, most of whom were involved with the Magnitsky case.
WORLD
March 19, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russian investigators found no evidence of violence against a lawyer who died in custody after accusing officials and police officers of running a multimillion-dollar tax refund scam, and have ended their probe, officials said Tuesday. Sergei Magnitsky, who worked as a legal advisor for the Hermitage Capital Management investment fund in Moscow, died in 2009 of heart insufficiency and brain and lung edema resulting from diabetes and hepatitis while in pretrial detention on tax charges, the Russian Investigative Committee said on its website.
WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament took a first step Wednesday toward banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents, a move intended as retaliation for an anti-corruption law recently passed by Congress. The State Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted 399 to 17 in favor of a bill that included the ban and also would annul an adoption agreement between the two countries that Russia ratified in July. The measure still has to be approved by the upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, who has sent mixed signals about his support.
WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - The Russian parliament's lower house Friday gave initial approval to a bill that would impose sanctions on U.S. citizens accused of human rights violations. The bill, which does not specify the kinds of violations that would apply, was named for Dima Yakovlev, a boy who was adopted and died of heatstroke after his American father left him in a parked car for hours four years ago in Virginia. It is expected to receive full parliamentary approval this month and become effective Jan. 1. The vote by Russian legislators came as President Obama on Friday signed a bill into law that helps increase U.S. business opportunities in Russia, but calls for punishment of Russians accused of human rights violations.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - After months of delays, U.S. lawmakers finally passed a trade bill with Russia. And perhaps no one was as deeply moved as investor William Browder. His emotions had nothing to do with the commercial implications of the legislation, which normalizes trade relations with Russia and should give a boost to big American exporters such as Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Instead, Browder's focus was entirely on a provision that would punish Russians accused of human rights abuses, specifically those involved in the 2009 death of his onetime Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky.
WORLD
November 17, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian officials are promising a tough response to U.S. legislation that would impose sanctions on Russian officials if Congress finds them responsible for violating human rights. The U.S. House on Friday passed a bill that establishes permanent normal trade relations with Russia, repealing the 1974 Jackson-Vanik amendment, which had imposed limits on trade because of the Soviet Union's treatment of Jews. It had been waived annually since 1989, two years before the Soviet Union collapsed.
WORLD
October 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Prisoners detained without charges. Prisons operating outside the legal system. Limits on free speech and the Internet. Legitimate voters prevented from casting their ballots. Sanctioned kidnappings. Witch hunts and torture. It's all part of life, says the Russian government - in the United States. The Russian Foreign Ministry on Monday issued a 56-page report in Russian and English titled, " On the Human Rights Situation in the United States . " The report, distributed at hearings held by the International Affairs Committee of Russia's lower house of parliament, was the first such full examination of the U.S. human rights record issued here since the fall of communism in 1991.
WORLD
July 6, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
He was chained to a cot, a lone prisoner in a small cell facing eight guards who beat him while a summoned ambulance crew was kept waiting outside. When the doctors were finally admitted to the prison, they found Moscow lawyer Sergei Magnitsky dead, his body bruised, most of his knuckles smashed, one of his arms dark blue from a grip of the handcuffs lying nearby. The attorney's death in Moscow's infamous Sailor's Silence prison was described Tuesday in a report delivered to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev by his advisory human rights council.
WORLD
October 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Prisoners detained without charges. Prisons operating outside the legal system. Limits on free speech and the Internet. Legitimate voters prevented from casting their ballots. Sanctioned kidnappings. Witch hunts and torture. It's all part of life, says the Russian government - in the United States. The Russian Foreign Ministry on Monday issued a 56-page report in Russian and English titled, " On the Human Rights Situation in the United States . " The report, distributed at hearings held by the International Affairs Committee of Russia's lower house of parliament, was the first such full examination of the U.S. human rights record issued here since the fall of communism in 1991.
WORLD
July 6, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
He was chained to a cot, a lone prisoner in a small cell facing eight guards who beat him while a summoned ambulance crew was kept waiting outside. When the doctors were finally admitted to the prison, they found Moscow lawyer Sergei Magnitsky dead, his body bruised, most of his knuckles smashed, one of his arms dark blue from a grip of the handcuffs lying nearby. The attorney's death in Moscow's infamous Sailor's Silence prison was described Tuesday in a report delivered to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev by his advisory human rights council.
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