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Sergei V Kiriyenko

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NEWS
April 18, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Russia's ornery lawmakers rejected Sergei V. Kiriyenko for the post of prime minister for the second time in a week Friday, those taken with the congenial, young, acting-government chief might have been wondering, "What's not to like?" Kiriyenko's credentials as a self-made success in the oil and banking industries should impress the most ardent of reformers.
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NEWS
August 24, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the throes of a financial crisis, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired his government Sunday and invited back to power Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the prime minister he ousted in March. The report of the firing of Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko was read at the end of the 7 p.m. television news, after the sports report, by a baffled presenter.
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NEWS
April 8, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Russian politicians met Tuesday to consider Boris N. Yeltsin's shock appointment of Sergei V. Kiriyenko as his new prime minister, they were quickly told that they had no real choice but to back the little-known 35-year-old technocrat who has unexpectedly won the maverick president's favor. Yeltsin fired the previous government March 23, thereby ridding himself of Viktor S.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonded by the shared interests of their families and a desire to save the world from nuclear peril, Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko deemed their first session of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Friday fruitful and grounds for real friendship.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonded by the shared interests of their families and a desire to save the world from nuclear peril, Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko deemed their first session of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Friday fruitful and grounds for real friendship.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the throes of a financial crisis, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired his government Sunday and invited back to power Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the prime minister he ousted in March. The report of the firing of Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko was read at the end of the 7 p.m. television news, after the sports report, by a baffled presenter.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after abruptly firing his prime minister and 30-member Cabinet, President Boris N. Yeltsin went on national television Monday and declared that "new views and fresh approaches" are needed to revive Russia's struggling economy. A grim Yeltsin did not explain what prompted him to jettison his top officials without warning but said the government must move more aggressively to improve the living conditions for the Russian people.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of Russia's Communist Party said his large faction in parliament will oppose President Boris N. Yeltsin's nominee for prime minister. Gennady A. Zyuganov told the Interfax news agency that he was not convinced of Sergei V. Kiriyenko's abilities. "We cannot confirm just anyone as the country's No. 2 leader," Zyuganov said. "If the president becomes seriously ill, then it will be the premier who takes responsibility for the nuclear 'briefcase.'
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia has seized four Japanese fishing boats in disputed waters off northern Japan, casting a cloud over a visit to Tokyo on Monday by Russian Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko. A spokesman for Japan's Maritime Safety Agency said the boats were seized Friday night off a four-island group known by Japan as the Northern Territories and by Russia as the southern Kurils.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko offered Saturday to make good on promises of economic aid to devastated rebel Chechnya, prompting the region's leader to say after a meeting that he had "new hope." After two hours of talks, Kiriyenko said: "We need stability and peace in Chechnya and the whole North Caucasus. . . . We need to settle Chechnya's economic problems.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Russia's ornery lawmakers rejected Sergei V. Kiriyenko for the post of prime minister for the second time in a week Friday, those taken with the congenial, young, acting-government chief might have been wondering, "What's not to like?" Kiriyenko's credentials as a self-made success in the oil and banking industries should impress the most ardent of reformers.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Russian politicians met Tuesday to consider Boris N. Yeltsin's shock appointment of Sergei V. Kiriyenko as his new prime minister, they were quickly told that they had no real choice but to back the little-known 35-year-old technocrat who has unexpectedly won the maverick president's favor. Yeltsin fired the previous government March 23, thereby ridding himself of Viktor S.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after abruptly firing his prime minister and 30-member Cabinet, President Boris N. Yeltsin went on national television Monday and declared that "new views and fresh approaches" are needed to revive Russia's struggling economy. A grim Yeltsin did not explain what prompted him to jettison his top officials without warning but said the government must move more aggressively to improve the living conditions for the Russian people.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Workers marched for back wages, Communists for an end to Boris N. Yeltsin's presidency and ultranationalists for a return to Russia's Soviet-era might as hundreds of thousands took to the streets Thursday nationwide. In rallies from Moscow to Vladivostok, Russians expressed their dissatisfaction with life in their post-Communist country. But, since there is no government at the moment, it was for the demonstrators to know whom to blame for what.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | Reuters
Unpaid Russian miners blocked the strategic Trans-Siberian railway line for three hours on Friday before being removed by police, a union official said. "They blocked the railroad but were forced by Interior Ministry forces to reopen it again," said Nikolai Shtyrkov, first deputy chairman of the Russian Independent Coal Miners' Union. "There were no clashes," said Shtyrkov, who added the action lasted about three hours and followed two days of protests alongside the line.
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