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Sergei V Stepashin

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NEWS
May 13, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russians know Sergei V. Stepashin as a military man who has more than once called out troops against his countrymen. In the popular mind, Stepashin is blamed for two of Russia's most shameful military disasters: the war against separatist Chechnya that killed 80,000 people, and a bungled raid against Chechen hostage-takers in 1995 that left more than 100 dead. He is also known to be fiercely loyal to President Boris N.
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NEWS
May 20, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin scored a major political victory Wednesday as parliament's lower house voted overwhelmingly to confirm his nominee, longtime loyalist Sergei V. Stepashin, as prime minister. By a vote of 301 to 55, the Duma temporarily set aside its rivalries and approved the three-star general and doctor of law who pledged to tackle Russia's economic problems aggressively and restore the country's greatness.
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NEWS
May 20, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin scored a major political victory Wednesday as parliament's lower house voted overwhelmingly to confirm his nominee, longtime loyalist Sergei V. Stepashin, as prime minister. By a vote of 301 to 55, the Duma temporarily set aside its rivalries and approved the three-star general and doctor of law who pledged to tackle Russia's economic problems aggressively and restore the country's greatness.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russians know Sergei V. Stepashin as a military man who has more than once called out troops against his countrymen. In the popular mind, Stepashin is blamed for two of Russia's most shameful military disasters: the war against separatist Chechnya that killed 80,000 people, and a bungled raid against Chechen hostage-takers in 1995 that left more than 100 dead. He is also known to be fiercely loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pushing Russia to the brink of a new political crisis, President Boris N. Yeltsin fired popular Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov on Wednesday and named the nation's top police official, Sergei V. Stepashin, to head a new government. Yeltsin, raising the stakes in his long-running battle with the Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, dismissed Primakov in an apparent bid to outmaneuver lawmakers as they decide this week whether to impeach the president.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | Reuters
President Boris N. Yeltsin named another batch of ministers to Russia's new Cabinet on Tuesday, including Mikhail Zadornov as first deputy prime minister in charge of the economy. Yeltsin also named Mikhail Kasyanov, chief foreign debt negotiator, as finance minister to replace Zadornov. A slew of other officials were confirmed in positions they occupied in the previous government.
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | Associated Press
Russia formed an elite task force Sunday to investigate bomb blasts near two Moscow synagogues and hinted that it suspected neo-Nazi activists. Interior Minister Sergei V. Stepashin said it wasn't clear that the synagogues were the targets of the bombings, however, noting that both blasts occurred near police medical facilities, the Interfax news agency reported. No one claimed responsibility for either explosion, the Federal Security Service said.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | Reuters
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday sacked Justice Minister Valentin A. Kovalev, who was caught up in a scandal involving a sauna video, and replaced him with a former national security chief, the Kremlin said. Kovalev's replacement is Sergei V. Stepashin, a former head of the Federal Security Service. Yeltsin suspended the justice minister June 22 pending a probe into a newspaper report alleging that Kovalev had been filmed in a gangland sauna with naked women.
NEWS
August 10, 1999
Recent Russian Cabinet changes by President Boris N. Yeltsin: * March 23, 1998: Yeltsin abruptly fires Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, who had served more than five years. The president says he wants to speed reforms and names 35-year-old Sergei V. Kiriyenko the new premier. Kiriyenko brings a group of young economic reformers into his government. * Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin changes governments like a man changing shirts. Monday he tossed Prime Minister Sergei V. Stepashin and his Cabinet out of office and named as acting premier a former intelligence agent, Vladimir V. Putin, head of the agency that succeeded the KGB. This was the fourth time in 17 months that Yeltsin had sacked a government, which illustrates both his temperamental nature and the inherent weaknesses of the Russian constitutional system.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pushing Russia to the brink of a new political crisis, President Boris N. Yeltsin fired popular Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov on Wednesday and named the nation's top police official, Sergei V. Stepashin, to head a new government. Yeltsin, raising the stakes in his long-running battle with the Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, dismissed Primakov in an apparent bid to outmaneuver lawmakers as they decide this week whether to impeach the president.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent effort to tighten his grip on power, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired a pro-Communist Cabinet minister Tuesday and promoted a loyal police commander. The dismissal of First Deputy Prime Minister Vadim A. Gustov and elevation of Interior Minister Sergei V. Stepashin is yet another curb on Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov, whose surge in popularity has appeared to irk the president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999
Min a stagnant economy and edging toward a major constitutional confrontation, Russia has now been thrust into political turmoil by a president whose mental and physical incapacities are on full public view. President Boris N. Yeltsin, among Russia's least popular politicians, has fired his prime minister, Yevgeny M. Primakov, who ranks among the more popular officials. This was the third time in little more than a year that Yeltsin has dismissed his chief minister.
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