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Sergio Cabrera

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NEWS
March 7, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergio Cabrera had a hard time adjusting when his family came home to Medellin after eight years in China. A teenager who had been a member of the militant Red Guard just did not fit into the city's conservative culture of the late 1960s. So he joined the country's Maoist guerrillas. Four years later, Cabrera came down from the mountains to become Colombia's most successful director.
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NEWS
March 7, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergio Cabrera had a hard time adjusting when his family came home to Medellin after eight years in China. A teenager who had been a member of the militant Red Guard just did not fit into the city's conservative culture of the late 1960s. So he joined the country's Maoist guerrillas. Four years later, Cabrera came down from the mountains to become Colombia's most successful director.
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NEWS
December 23, 1985
Two 24-year-old Mexicans living and working in San Diego County died early Sunday when their car veered off Interstate 805 in Chula Vista and struck a disabled car on the shoulder, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol said. The men, identified by the county coroner's office as Francisco Garcia-Curiel of San Ysidro and Sergio Cabrera-Valdiva of Chula Vista, were found dead at the scene of accident, which the CHP said occurred about 5:45 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1985
Two 24-year-old Mexicans living and working in San Diego County died early Sunday when their car veered off Interstate 805 in Chula Vista and struck a disabled car on the shoulder, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol reported. The men, identified by the county coroner's office as Francisco Garcia-Curiel of San Ysidro and Sergio Cabrera-Valdiva of Chula Vista, were found dead at the scene of the accident, which the CHP said occurred at about 5:45 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER
A 23-year-old man was shot several times after two carloads of people confronted him and several others on a neighborhood street early Sunday, Huntington Beach Police Lt. Luis Ochoa said. Police later arrested four men and two juveniles, all of Anaheim, in connection with the shooting. The victim, whose name has not been released, is recovering at a local hospital. The incident occurred on the 100 block of 7th Street about 3 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All the police know for sure about a band of Spanish-speaking thieves who have robbed 26 family-run Latino restaurants and markets in the San Fernando Valley since mid-June is they like sangria -flavored refrescos and pupusas. Those goods--fruit-flavored soda and Salvadoran turnovers--are among the items the thieves have ordered and even consumed at the businesses before robbing them, storekeepers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although rambling and repetitive, Jonathan Blank's important, comprehensive documentary, "Sex, Drugs and Democracy" (Friday at the Nuart for one week) reveals how effectively the Netherland's progressive society works in regulating, rather than banning, drugs and prostitution, and in providing civil rights for one and all. Apparently, Holland's history as a small country of pragmatic traders has made for its unusually enlightened views. (310) 478-6379.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Los Angeles is going to be the largest showcase of international performing and creative artistry . . . ever," proclaimed Mayor Tom Bradley on Thursday at a downtown press conference unveiling the first list of programs to be included in the Los Angeles Festival. Announced were 72 programs of dance, music, visual art, theater, poetry, film, video and performance art, including 14 international groups comprised of nearly 300 performers.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of it as the Latin American literary masterpiece "One Hundred Years of Solitude," set to music. A multiethnic trio of instruments--a European accordion, an African drum and a scraper-like Indian piece of percussion called a guacharaca--creates a syncopated rhythm to lyrics that read like pastoral poetry. The words celebrate this steamy valley where an occasional breeze off the Guajira Desert to the northeast provides about as much relief as a Santa Ana wind.
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