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Sergio Jarpa

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NEWS
July 7, 1989
A united Chilean opposition nominated moderate politician Patricio Aylwin as its candidate to succeed President Augusto Pinochet in elections set for Dec. 14. Aylwin, a 70-year-old law professor, former Senate president and current president of the centrist Christian Democratic Party, accepted the nomination by the 17-party coalition. Meanwhile, the conservative pro-government forces continued difficult negotiations to choose their presidential candidate.
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NEWS
July 7, 1989
A united Chilean opposition nominated moderate politician Patricio Aylwin as its candidate to succeed President Augusto Pinochet in elections set for Dec. 14. Aylwin, a 70-year-old law professor, former Senate president and current president of the centrist Christian Democratic Party, accepted the nomination by the 17-party coalition. Meanwhile, the conservative pro-government forces continued difficult negotiations to choose their presidential candidate.
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NEWS
October 6, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Augusto Pinochet suffered a stunning defeat in a plebiscite Wednesday, rejected by his people in the first presidential vote since he seized power in a coup 15 years ago. The united opposition claimed victory by a margin of 58% to 42% over Pinochet, with more than two-thirds of the vote counted in two parallel, unofficial tallies. Opposition leaders declared the vote a mandate from Chileans for a return to the nation's traditional democracy.
WORLD
September 11, 2003 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
President Salvador Allende did not leave this world quietly. With army tanks surrounding his offices in the downtown La Moneda palace, and jets overhead poised to drop bombs on him, he went on the radio for one last defiant speech. "I will not resign," he said. "I will offer my life to repay the loyalty of the Chilean people." Then he donned a helmet, grabbed a machine gun -- and eventually shot himself. In the three decades that have followed the military coup led by Gen.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Augusto Pinochet declared Sunday night that he will not negotiate with the opposition on demands for political reforms and for his early departure from power, despite his defeat in a presidential plebiscite last week. In an interview broadcast on national television, Pinochet issued an unequivocal refusal to consider changes in the constitution, which keeps him in power until March, 1990, three months after multi-party elections scheduled for December, 1989.
NEWS
April 24, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
President Augusto Pinochet, Chile's military ruler, is described by close associates as euphoric over the results of his government's hardened repression against political dissent. "He is like a kid with a new bicycle," said one person who has been in frequent contact with Pinochet over the last four months. During that time, the regime has toughened its anti-communist stance and virtually closed off contacts with the political opposition.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades of tumult and conflict under Marxist rule and right-wing dictatorship, Chile's politicians are displaying unaccustomed harmony on the eve of the nation's return to democracy. The center-left "rainbow coalition" predicts landslide victories in presidential and congressional elections Thursday to replace the military government of President Augusto Pinochet. Right-wing parties hope for at least a decent showing in House and Senate races.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
His supporters are bickering and he is a lame-duck president tarnished by a trouncing at the polls, but Gen. Augusto Pinochet has no plans to retire quietly to a country villa. Pinochet and his military allies are reminding Chileans that when his term ends next March, he will merely move from the presidential palace to a new office across the street in the Defense Ministry.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Several hundred thousand Chileans turned out Friday for a joyous victory party, celebrating Gen. Augusto Pinochet's defeat with songs, chants and dances including the "Waltz of the No." The opposition coalition hurriedly organized what it called the "Fiesta for Democracy and Reconciliation" in a park here to let people unleash emotions generated by Pinochet's trouncing in Wednesday's presidential plebiscite.
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