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Sergio Zyman

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BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Coca-Cola Co. executive Sergio Zyman treats life's routine stops as opportunities to gather grist to feed his constantly churning marketing mill. Before ordering lunch at the Pacific Dining Car in Los Angeles, Zyman queries the waiter on the merits of the restaurant's menu. In between bites of his medium-rare steak sandwich, he critiques a previous night's hotel accommodations to illustrate the importance of listening to customers.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Coca-Cola Co. executive Sergio Zyman treats life's routine stops as opportunities to gather grist to feed his constantly churning marketing mill. Before ordering lunch at the Pacific Dining Car in Los Angeles, Zyman queries the waiter on the merits of the restaurant's menu. In between bites of his medium-rare steak sandwich, he critiques a previous night's hotel accommodations to illustrate the importance of listening to customers.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Coca-Cola Co. marketing chief Sergio Zyman has joined the board of directors at Launch Media Inc., a Santa Monica-based new media company. Zyman, 53, is credited with helping to turn Coke into a dominant worldwide brand and building Sprite into one of the Atlanta-based company's most successful beverage lines. "Sergio did some tremendous work at Coke in the early '90s in terms of brand positioning and brand building," said John Sicher, publisher of Beverage Digest, a Bedford Hills, N.Y.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Coca-Cola Co. marketing chief Sergio Zyman has joined the board of directors at Launch Media Inc., a Santa Monica-based new media company. Zyman, 53, is credited with helping to turn Coke into a dominant worldwide brand and building Sprite into one of the Atlanta-based company's most successful beverage lines. "Sergio did some tremendous work at Coke in the early '90s in terms of brand positioning and brand building," said John Sicher, publisher of Beverage Digest, a Bedford Hills, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1985 | AGUSTIN GURZA
The commercial rivalry between Coke and Pepsi has spilled onto a new and unexpected battlefront: the charity recording by 49 Latino pop stars patterned after the USA for Africa campaign. Nearly two weeks after its May 20 targeted release date, the single, "Cantare, Cantaras," is still held up because of a squabble involving singer Julio Iglesias, the record's most prominent personality.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Coca-Cola to Introduce New Soft Drink: The company said it will market an orange-flavored soda called OK that will be aimed at young males. Sergio Zyman, Coca-Cola Co.'s senior vice president and chief marketing officer, told a news conference that the orange-brown colored soda is aimed at 12- to 25-year-olds, particularly young men. "There is a latent demand for new brands that represent values of today's youth, especially young males," he said.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Coca-Cola Co.'s Sergio Zyman, credited with rejuvenating Coke's multibillion-dollar advertising machine, said Thursday that he is resigning. The soft drink giant named Charles Frenette, president of Coke's southern Africa division, to succeed Zyman as chief marketing officer when he leaves May 1. During his years at Coke, Zyman earned a reputation as an arrogant but effective manager.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1986
Coca-Cola U.S.A., Atlanta, said Wednesday that its senior vice president for marketing, Sergio Zyman, who was involved in the highly successful "Coke Is It" campaign and the controversial introduction of New Coke, has resigned. John C. Reid, currently vice president for marketing in the fountain department, will take over Zyman's position Aug. 1, Coca-Cola said. The company said Zyman plans to lead a Mexican private investment group. He joined Coca-Cola U.S.A.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
PepsiCo Inc. may replace the chief marketing executive at its Pepsi-Cola Co. beverage business amid dissatisfaction with the unit's advertising campaign, industry analysts said Monday. Pepsi-Cola's Brian Swette, 44, approved the creation of the company's "Generation Next" campaign. The ads, featuring skydiving and a teenager with pierced nose, ears and eyelids, are designed as a contemporary version of the "Pepsi Generation" spots that 30 years ago helped Pepsi gain on rival Coca-Cola Co.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madison Avenue was abuzz Tuesday about whether Michael Ovitz's move to Walt Disney Co. might affect CAA's relationship with Coca-Cola Co. CAA has just completed 11 commercials for the soft drink company, which annually spends about $340 million on advertising. The Coke-CAA deal marked the first time a major advertiser had turned to a talent agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1985 | AGUSTIN GURZA
The commercial rivalry between Coke and Pepsi has spilled onto a new and unexpected battlefront: the charity recording by 49 Latino pop stars patterned after the USA for Africa campaign. Nearly two weeks after its May 20 targeted release date, the single, "Cantare, Cantaras," is still held up because of a squabble involving singer Julio Iglesias, the record's most prominent personality.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2008 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
Samsung probably thought it was a slam-dunk marketing scheme: As the Olympic torch made its way around the world, people could send text messages to the company with the word "torch" and win a new cellphone. As scores of demonstrators crowded the streets of downtown San Francisco on Wednesday to protest China's occupation of Tibet, forcing a re-routing of the relay and the deployment of the city's entire police force, it might not have looked like such a good idea.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1995 | JAMES BATES and DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Coca-Cola Co. on Thursday formally ended its advertising relationship with Creative Artists Agency, forming a new ad company with Walt Disney Co. and three former CAA executives as minority partners. The move had been expected, and ends a 4-year-old venture with CAA in which a Hollywood talent agency for the first time was commissioned to create a major ad campaign.
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