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Sergiu Celac

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December 31, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most striking feature of the new interim government of Romania, created amid the chaos of the bloody uprising last week, is that many of its leaders are the reform-minded sons of once-influential Communists who served the executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, according to U.S. and academic specialists. Their program appears to be to make Romania into a West European-style social democracy.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most striking feature of the new interim government of Romania, created amid the chaos of the bloody uprising last week, is that many of its leaders are the reform-minded sons of once-influential Communists who served the executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, according to U.S. and academic specialists. Their program appears to be to make Romania into a West European-style social democracy.
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NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Trials of Nicolae Ceausescu's eldest son and his Communist cronies are expected to begin this week, Romanian state television said Sunday. The TV showed Valentin Ceausescu, former Communist Party Secretary Emil Bobu, former Interior Minister Tudor Postelnicu, Marin Neagoe, who directed personal security for Ceausescu, and Dimitru Popescu, former director of the Sociopolitical Academy.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | From Reuters
The brother of executed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was sentenced to 15 years in prison Thursday for inciting genocide and attempted murder during the December revolution, court officials said. A military court in Bucharest handed down the sentence on Nicolae Andruta Ceausescu, 66, making him the first member of his family to be punished in the courts since the Stalinist dictator was shot on Christmas Day.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Petre Roman named a new government Thursday and warned that Romania's fragile economy could collapse if firm measures are not taken to clamp down on excessive wage demands and falling productivity. Roman told Parliament that the drop in productivity in several industrial sectors is unjustified and intolerable and that pay increases granted despite falling output could "lead to an uncontrollable explosion of the economic mechanism."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret police serving fallen dictator Nicolae Ceausescu were deeply suspicious of new Romanian leader Ion Iliescu and his connections with the Soviet Union months before the popular uprising that toppled the regime, according to interviews with former political prisoners here.
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