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Serial Killer

ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Meg James
ABC killed two of its long-running soap operas - "All My Children" and "One Life to Live" - more than a year ago. Now, in true soap opera fashion, the network stands accused of trying to snuff out the very same shows - again. On Thursday, production company Prospect Park Networks filed a $25-million breach of contract lawsuit against the Walt Disney Co-owned broadcast network. The suit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, alleged that ABC backstabbed the production firm by carrying out a devious plot to destroy Prospect's efforts to bring the beloved daytime dramas back to life as online productions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Dennis Lim
With his 1947 provocation "Monsieur Verdoux," Charlie Chaplin completed a remarkable transformation from the universally beloved Little Tramp to a vilified monster both on-screen and off. In the most polarizing film of his career, just issued on DVD by the Criterion Collection, Chaplin plays the title character, a bank clerk who loses his job and finds a new business in murder - "liquidating members of the opposite sex," as he puts it. ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
Opening a new frontier for solving cold cases, California prosecutors are hunting for DNA from killers, rapists and other prison inmates who died before authorities obtained their genetic profiles. Prosecutors from Sacramento, Los Angeles and Orange counties are sifting through old court exhibits and examining long-since forgotten crime-scene evidence in search of blood, saliva and other material that can be tested for DNA. Once obtained, the DNA is compared with the genetic profiles from unsolved cases that have DNA from unidentified perpetrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Opening a new frontier for solving cold cases, California prosecutors are hunting for DNA from killers, rapists and other prison inmates who died before authorities obtained their genetic profiles. Prosecutors from Sacramento, Los Angeles and Orange counties are sifting through old court exhibits and examining long-since forgotten crime-scene evidence in search of blood, saliva and other material that can be tested for DNA. Once obtained, the DNA is compared with the genetic profiles from unsolved cases that have DNA from unidentified perpetrators.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Plans for the future of Showtime's long-running serial killer drama "Dexter" have been vague as the series heads into its eighth season. But in a discussion with Wall Street analysts, CBS Corp. Chief Executive Les Moonves may have revealed when the series will end. According to the Hollywood Reporter, an analyst's question Monday about coming programming on the CBS-owned pay channel prompted the exec to say, "We have 'Ray Donovan'   ...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Mesmerizing and haunting, "The Jeffrey Dahmer Files" is an inside-out serial killer movie, lacking in gore or cheap psychology and made in part for those who think they never want to see another serial killer movie. A hybrid of documentary and fiction, the film is directed by Milwaukee-based Chris James Thompson in his feature debut. Rather than indulging in exploitation kicks, the film engages more with Dahmer's impact on the community. The fictional footage features Andrew Swant as the notorious Dahmer, who murdered and dismembered 17 people; he seems to be a bland, weird-but-harmless blank slate.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Jail couldn't keep Israel Keyes out of trouble, not even with himself. The prolific serial killer had already been caught and jailed by authorities months ago for his final butchery -- the kidnapping and slaying of 18-year-old Anchorage barista Samantha Koenig, one of the eight people he'd alluded to killing over years of attacks across the country. But a new report released this week by the Alaska Department of Corrections detailed the extent to which the 34-year-old construction worker continued to cause trouble with his captors even as he cooperated with investigators working to discover whom he'd killed.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Israel Keyes never told investigators about everybody he killed. And in the final bloodied, crumpled notes in his Anchorage jail cell when guards found him strangled with hands slit on Dec. 2, he didn't say much else either. Instead, Keyes -- who claimed to have killed at least eight people across the U.S. over a period of several years -- wrote angst-ridden, morbid poetry on the four pages released by the FBI on Wednesday. "Turn a blind eye back to the screen, soak in your reality shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
A man accused of being the notorious "Skid Row Stabber," linked to a series of killings in Los Angeles during the 1970s, has been indicted on murder charges involving the slayings of three men, according to court records unsealed Tuesday. Bobby Joe Maxwell, who has spent more than 30 years behind bars, was convicted of two murders in a 1984 trial involving 10 slayings. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the two convictions in 2010, finding that a jailhouse informant who was a key prosecution witness was a habitual liar with "a long and public history of dishonesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Kevin Bacon has given Fox some of its best ratings news in months. Bacon's gory new serial-killer drama "The Following" slashed its way to 10.4 million total viewers in its Monday premiere, according to Nielsen. That placed "The Following" solidly among TV's highest-rated new dramas this season. NBC's post-apocalyptic "Revolution" (11.6 million for the premiere) and CBS' Sherlock Holmes update "Elementary" (13.4 million) drew somewhat larger total audiences, but Bacon's show actually tied "Elementary" among young adults.
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