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Serial Murders California

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NEWS
February 19, 1996 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbara Biehn spent years crafting the miniature Christmas village that dominates her living room. It is a scene of tiny skaters and hand-painted houses--an idyll of calm and neighborly good cheer. It is everything that her wrecked life is not. In Biehn's world, it is unsafe to venture outside after the sun goes down. It is hard to make friends, easy to hide away. And serial killers are real. One of them, William G.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court has delayed the case against a man accused of being a serial killer after determining that another case may affect his prosecution. Wayne Adam Ford, 39, has been charged with the strangulation of four women he allegedly picked up along his trucking route through the state in 1997 and 1998. He has pleaded not guilty . If convicted, Ford could face the death penalty.
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NEWS
February 11, 1996 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killer's taped voice speaks horrors that sicken even many years later. His tone is as casual as a call home. "I tied him up with nylon--this electrician type of wire. I pulled a knife on him and he got scared . . . I stabbed him in the left arm. It surprised me that I did it. "I stabbed him again and then again, and again and again until he was helpless." The voice belongs to William G.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A serial killer believed to be responsible for as many as 10 unsolved murders in Orange, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties from 1979 to 1986 apparently got his start a few years earlier as the notorious "East Area rapist" of Northern California, officials said Tuesday. New DNA evidence revealed Tuesday links the murderer--dubbed the "Original Nightstalker" by local detectives--to at least 44 rapes committed from Sacramento to San Ramon during a three-year period in the 1970s.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gold miners and antique dealers and loggers who dot the sparse foothills of Calaveras County call him simply by his last name: Ng. They snarl as they say it. Wind your way through the county Mark Twain made famous in 1865, and it won't take long to find someone with a chilling connection to the man they say defamed this place 120 years later. There's Danny Schembri at the car shop, who had to plow over the mound of makeshift graves with his tractor.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I intend to be at the execution," the gentle, gray-haired woman said quietly. "I want to see him die." The tall, handsome, often charming man Sue Mills was talking about is Dean Philip Carter, 34, adopted son of a police chief, doting father of twins and skilled television cameraman who did commended work on a documentary about the heritage of Eskimos.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY and TILLE FONG, Times Staff Writers
Detectives painstakingly unearthed each square foot of land behind an aging clapboard house Thursday where two badly decomposed bodies were discovered in shallow graves, but found no more victims of a suspected serial killer. A 43-year-old handyman, Morris Solomon Jr., was booked into Sacramento County Jail on suspicion of six murders late Wednesday after detectives unearthed the two still-unidentified bodies in the backyard of the Oak Park house where he once lived.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rex Allen Krebs, identified as the prime suspect in the disappearances and deaths of two college students, says he's a monster and deserves to die. Yet he certainly kept that dark side from his girlfriend, co-workers and others who met him in this close-knit university town on California's lower central coast. Jailed late last month on unrelated parole violations, Krebs has been linked by police to the deaths of Rachel Newhouse of Irvine and Aundria Crawford.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writer
When Ricardo Ordorica rented his home to a soft-spoken white-haired woman two years ago, the Mexican immigrant thought he had finally stepped up a rung on the American ladder to success. He had worked eight years as a night janitor to earn the down payment for the quaint Victorian house on a tree-lined downtown street. And his first and only tenant meant that he could afford to move his family to a better neighborhood in suburbia.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wayne Adam Ford, the long-haul trucker accused of killing four women across the state, insisted in an interview last week that he is "not guilty of murder" but might deserve to spend the rest of his life in a psychiatric hospital. In his first interview since he walked into a Eureka, Calif., sheriff's station last November--carrying a woman's severed breast in a plastic bag--Ford linked his misdeeds to a brain injury he said he suffered in a highway accident about 15 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a painful, reluctant gathering--one that opened old wounds that had never fully healed. But relatives of two victims of a recently identified serial killer begged the public for help Wednesday as detectives continued an intense hunt for a person who may have committed as many as 10 slayings nearly two decades ago. Family members spoke of recent breakthroughs in the case. Of a $100,000 reward. Of the devastating losses that still feel fresh today.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wayne Adam Ford, the long-haul trucker accused of killing four women across the state, insisted in an interview last week that he is "not guilty of murder" but might deserve to spend the rest of his life in a psychiatric hospital. In his first interview since he walked into a Eureka, Calif., sheriff's station last November--carrying a woman's severed breast in a plastic bag--Ford linked his misdeeds to a brain injury he said he suffered in a highway accident about 15 years ago.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | MARK ARAX and DAVE LESHER and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The killings Cary Stayner is accused of carrying out might have continued if his fourth victim had not put up such a valiant fight, a struggle that forced Stayner to leave behind a sloppy trail of clues that led investigators straight to his doorstep. In the final moments of her life, sources close to the investigation said, Joie Armstrong might have saved other lives.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rex Allen Krebs, identified as the prime suspect in the disappearances and deaths of two college students, says he's a monster and deserves to die. Yet he certainly kept that dark side from his girlfriend, co-workers and others who met him in this close-knit university town on California's lower central coast. Jailed late last month on unrelated parole violations, Krebs has been linked by police to the deaths of Rachel Newhouse of Irvine and Aundria Crawford.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS and TOM GORMAN and ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Andy Lowery thought he had seen the type before when Wayne Adam Ford first walked into his Christian book and music shop a couple of years ago. "People who have problems come to see the Christian people," Lowery says. Ford said his marriage had busted up, he was losing touch with the toddler son he adored, his life was adrift. Lowery tried to help, selling Ford evangelical tracts and a Bible on tape to listen to on his trucking routes. He even took Ford to his men's Bible study group.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-haul trucker Wayne Adam Ford, who allegedly confessed to killing four women over the past year, told authorities that he picked up at least five other women in Bakersfield since February for sex--but that each was alive when they got out of the cab of his truck, an investigator said Tuesday. Three of the women simply got out of his cab and walked away, but Ford said he had to lift two women down from his truck because they were still bound, said Kern County Sheriff's Det. Ron Taylor.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court judge Friday revoked accused mass murderer Charles Ng's right to represent himself, accusing the defendant of playing "games within games within games" in an attempt to delay the start of his Sept. 1 trial. "You're not preparing for trial. It seems what you've been doing is spending time and money delaying the trial," said Judge John J. Ryan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
Suspected serial killer Glen Rogers on Friday was given one week to fight extradition to Florida, one of four states--including California--where he is wanted for murder. His attorney said he was "leaning toward" a court action challenging Kentucky Gov. Paul Patton's extradition order, signed on Thursday. Kentucky Atty. Gen. Ben Chandler said he recommended extradition to Florida because that state had the strongest case against Rogers and plans to ask for the death penalty.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year-old woman has identified suspected serial killer Wayne Adam Ford as the man who picked her up in Santa Rosa in August and raped, beat and robbed her, a spokesman for the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department said Monday. Lt. Mike Brown said the department is seeking charges, including kidnapping and rape, against Ford, who is being held in Humboldt County Jail in lieu of $1-million bail.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four dead women dumped in remote bodies of water: the California Aqueduct, an irrigation canal and an isolated marsh. Four cold cases, no leads and no suspects, the kind of investigations that haunt a law enforcement officer. Then Wayne Adam Ford walked into the Humboldt County Sheriff's Department with a troubled heart and a woman's breast, two hours before the polls closed Tuesday. And everything changed.
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