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Serial Murders Los Angeles County

NEWS
February 25, 1989 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writers
At 6 feet 2 and more than 220 pounds, Rickey S. Ross was known by some of his colleagues as "a gentle giant," a religious man and conscientious deputy sheriff who had never been seriously disciplined in his 18 years with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "He was a very good officer, very well regarded," said a fellow deputy who has known Ross for years. "He was highly religious. Nobody would have ever thought of Rickey Ross. He was well-liked by everyone on the department."
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NEWS
November 30, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted serial killer Randy Steven Kraft was sentenced to death Wednesday by a judge who said the mutilations carried out by the 44-year-old computer consultant were "hard for me to comprehend." "I can't imagine doing these things in scientific experiments on a dead person, much less (to) someone alive," Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin said. The judge's decision to uphold the jury's Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge on Friday took jurisdiction over all four civil lawsuits against the self-proclaimed "Angel of Death" and his employer, Glendale Adventist Medical Center, by families of Efren Saldivar's alleged victims. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Carl J. West ruled the cases are related and, under court rules, determined that he should preside over all of them, instead of having four different judges handle the four separate cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the bodies of four women were found in the East San Gabriel Valley and nearby Chino last fall, authorities said the killings did not appear to be linked. The victims were all black and in their 30s, they had been strangled and their bodies had been thrown in business parks or by roadsides. But investigators said the similarities were happenstance and not the work of a serial killer. They said that the bodies of eight slain women had been found dumped in Los Angeles in November alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1991 | VICKI TORRES and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man charged with abducting and killing three San Gabriel Valley residents has confessed to a total of four murders, saying he committed the crimes to "get back at society," court papers obtained Wednesday show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Three times, Launie Dempster saw Richard Ramirez lurking in the pre-dawn darkness as she delivered newspapers in Monterey Park. The first time, Ramirez was sitting in a parked car in the 1500 block of Trumbower Avenue as she drove by. But she thought little of it until an hour later when, at the end of her route, she drove down the same block. There she saw paramedics and police at 1586 Trumbower--the site of one of the 13 Night Stalker murders with which Ramirez is now charged.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four people were arrested Friday in connection with the abduction and slaying of three San Gabriel Valley shoppers, and authorities said the well-armed gang apparently intended to continue its rampage of lethal robberies. The suspects--two men recently released from jail and two women--were captured in a predawn raid on their West Covina apartment, not far from the Puente Hills shopping mall where at least one of the victims was kidnaped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
The object of a massive police manhunt at age 25, Richard Ramirez has marked three birthdays in a tiny, pale-blue cell in the Los Angeles County Jail, reading, exercising and, occasionally, boasting about the Night Stalker killings with which he is charged. This morning, a month shy of his 29th birthday, the drifter from El Paso, Tex., goes on trial for his life. But if Ramirez harbors any trepidations about the possibility of going to the gas chamber, he does not show it. In court, he became a studious participant in the preparation of his defense, taking notes and consulting animatedly with members of his legal team as they went about selecting a jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A gloomy and "emotionally distraught" Richard Ramirez wants to forgo any defense, even an opening statement, in the so-called Night Stalker trial despite the advice of his lawyers, one of Ramirez's attorneys said Wednesday. "I think he (Ramirez) thinks that it won't do any good," Ray G. Clark said Wednesday in explaining why he and co-counsel Daniel V. Hernandez have told Judge Michael A. Tynan that they may present no defense case when the trial resumes on Monday. Between now and then, Clark said in an interview, he and Hernandez will attempt to change their client's mind, and hope to elicit the help of Ramirez's parents toward that end. Case law is not entirely clear on whether defense lawyers may go ahead with a defense over a client's objections in a death penalty case, and Clark said he has been consulting with the State Bar's Ethics Committee and the California Appellate Project, which provides assistance to lawyers handling such cases.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
After four days of deliberations, jurors recommended on Wednesday that Texas drifter Richard Ramirez be sentenced to death for the Night Stalker murders, a rampage of savage, Satanic-tinged slayings that haunted Southern California in the summer of 1985. "We the jury . . . fix the penalty therefor at death," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A.
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