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NEWS
April 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
A former Navy man was arrested Wednesday in the slayings of three prostitutes in Detroit and may be linked to killings in three other states and several other countries, the police chief said. The man, whose identity was not disclosed because he has not been charged, was once a refueler on the aircraft carrier Nimitz. He also is suspected in slayings in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Tel Aviv and Thailand--all ports of call for the Nimitz, Police Chief Benny Napoleon said.
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NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A man suspected of going from port to port strangling women while in the Navy might have begun killing eight years ago, and his victim total could reach 20, police said Thursday. John Eric Armstrong, 26, is accused of killing five Detroit area prostitutes and is suspected in at least 11 other slayings since 1992: three in the Seattle area, two in Hawaii, two in Hong Kong and one each in North Carolina, Virginia, Thailand and Singapore.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
His family adores him. Close friends support him. Former co-workers boast he was personable, bright, a hard worker. But the question for Randy Steven Kraft is whether their testimony, if it happens, will be enough to spare him from a death verdict. The 44-year-old computer consultant, convicted by a jury two months ago of 16 Orange County murders, returns to Superior Court in Santa Ana on Monday as his attorneys begin their case in the penalty phase of the trial.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
A former Navy man was arrested Wednesday in the slayings of three prostitutes in Detroit and may be linked to killings in three other states and several other countries, the police chief said. The man, whose identity was not disclosed because he has not been charged, was once a refueler on the aircraft carrier Nimitz. He also is suspected in slayings in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Tel Aviv and Thailand--all ports of call for the Nimitz, Police Chief Benny Napoleon said.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A man suspected of going from port to port strangling women while in the Navy might have begun killing eight years ago, and his victim total could reach 20, police said Thursday. John Eric Armstrong, 26, is accused of killing five Detroit area prostitutes and is suspected in at least 11 other slayings since 1992: three in the Seattle area, two in Hawaii, two in Hong Kong and one each in North Carolina, Virginia, Thailand and Singapore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1989 | JAMES W. GUTHRIE, James W. Guthrie, a professor in the graduate school of education at UC Berkeley, is co-director of Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). In addition, he has twice been elected to the board of education in Berkeley.
The Los Angeles Unified School District teachers' strike will be settled. Strikes of this magnitude always are. Additional state money may be needed to reach an agreement. However, give-and-take by both management and labor, perhaps with a nudge from parents and public officials, will eventually result in a settlement. Nevertheless, if past practice can be relied on for a prediction, after the strike the teachers will teach, students will go to class and school policy-makers and managers will continue to operate the system in the current manner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
It's just a sheet of paper, the yellow faded almost to white after six years. It has 61 entries, divided into two columns of tiny, almost perfectly lettered, printed words. Some sort of code, anyone would say at first glance. It was found in a notebook in the trunk of Randy Steven Kraft's car on the morning of May 14, 1983, when he was arrested with a dead Marine in the front passenger seat. Prosecutors say it is Kraft's death list. "It is the most explosive piece of evidence ever introduced in an Orange County courtroom," said one defense lawyer who has followed the Kraft case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
His family adores him. Close friends support him. Former co-workers boast he was personable, bright, a hard worker. But the question for Randy Steven Kraft is whether their testimony, if it happens, will be enough to spare him from a death verdict. The 44-year-old computer consultant, convicted by a jury two months ago of 16 Orange County murders, returns to Superior Court in Santa Ana on Monday as his attorneys begin their case in the penalty phase of the trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
It's just a sheet of paper, the yellow faded almost to white after six years. It has 61 entries, divided into two columns of tiny, almost perfectly lettered, printed words. Some sort of code, anyone would say at first glance. It was found in a notebook in the trunk of Randy Steven Kraft's car on the morning of May 14, 1983, when he was arrested with a dead Marine in the front passenger seat. Prosecutors say it is Kraft's death list. "It is the most explosive piece of evidence ever introduced in an Orange County courtroom," said one defense lawyer who has followed the Kraft case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1989 | JAMES W. GUTHRIE, James W. Guthrie, a professor in the graduate school of education at UC Berkeley, is co-director of Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). In addition, he has twice been elected to the board of education in Berkeley.
The Los Angeles Unified School District teachers' strike will be settled. Strikes of this magnitude always are. Additional state money may be needed to reach an agreement. However, give-and-take by both management and labor, perhaps with a nudge from parents and public officials, will eventually result in a settlement. Nevertheless, if past practice can be relied on for a prediction, after the strike the teachers will teach, students will go to class and school policy-makers and managers will continue to operate the system in the current manner.
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