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NEWS
July 14, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alleged serial killer who for months darted cross-country by railroad, evading authorities and chilling communities from Texas to Kentucky, walked over a bridge to an El Paso border checkpoint Tuesday morning and gave himself up to authorities. Fulfilling an agreement brokered by his sister, 39-year-old Rafael Resendez-Ramirez pleasantly extended his hand to a Texas Ranger waiting with two other officers, then was handcuffed and led into custody.
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NEWS
August 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ignoring legal advice, multiple murder defendant Angel Maturino Resendiz sent a rambling letter to a television station, touching on topics ranging from why he surrendered to how much he loves his dogs. In the 11-page letter received by Houston station KTRK, Maturino Resendiz didn't discuss the string of killings across three states that put him on the FBI's 10 most wanted list, but he did make an ominous reference to a "creature" inside him that scares him.
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NEWS
July 16, 1999 | Reuters
A suspected serial killer who gave himself up in Texas this week was apparently unaware that he could face execution in the Lone Star state, his attorney was quoted as saying in Thursday's Houston Chronicle. "He was just told he would be treated humanely. He interpreted that to mean that they would not try to kill him," court-appointed attorney Alan Tanner said. U.S. authorities believe Angel Maturino Resendez, a Mexican national, has killed at least nine people.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | From Reuters
The sister of serial killing suspect Angel Maturino Resendiz has been paid $86,000 in reward money for arranging her brother's surrender, the FBI said Thursday. New Mexico resident Manuela Karkiewicz negotiated the surrender in exchange for a promise of humane treatment and a psychiatric evaluation for her brother, who is suspected in at least nine slayings in three states. Police insisted they made no deal with Karkiewicz to pay her the reward in exchange for turning in Maturino Resendiz.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
The man wanted in connection with eight slayings committed near railroad tracks was in the custody of immigration officials earlier this month but was let go, federal authorities said Friday. The Immigration and Naturalization Service arrested Rafael Resendez-Ramirez in the El Paso area during the first week of June for being in this country illegally and deported him to Mexico later the same day, the FBI said.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ignoring legal advice, multiple murder defendant Angel Maturino Resendiz sent a rambling letter to a television station, touching on topics ranging from why he surrendered to how much he loves his dogs. In the 11-page letter received by Houston station KTRK, Maturino Resendiz didn't discuss the string of killings across three states that put him on the FBI's 10 most wanted list, but he did make an ominous reference to a "creature" inside him that scares him.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Accused "railroad" serial killer Angel Maturino Resendez was indicted in Houston on a capital murder charge in the December slaying of Claudia Benton, one of nine people he is suspected of killing. Prosecutors said they have not decided whether to seek the death penalty. Arraignment was set for today. Maturino Resendez, 39, is already charged in four slayings in Illinois, Texas and Kentucky. Police say evidence links him to five other Texas killings. Assistant Dist. Atty.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When accused killer Angel Maturino Resendez, who surrendered to authorities Tuesday, crossed from Mexico and shook hands with a Texas Ranger, it was more than the end of a fevered two-country manhunt. By insisting on giving up to the Rangers--the nation's oldest, perhaps most storied body of state lawmen--Resendez also was crossing a long bridge from past to present built by this once-bloody vigilante group, launched 176 years ago to defend white Texans.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | From Reuters
The sister of serial killing suspect Angel Maturino Resendiz has been paid $86,000 in reward money for arranging her brother's surrender, the FBI said Thursday. New Mexico resident Manuela Karkiewicz negotiated the surrender in exchange for a promise of humane treatment and a psychiatric evaluation for her brother, who is suspected in at least nine slayings in three states. Police insisted they made no deal with Karkiewicz to pay her the reward in exchange for turning in Maturino Resendiz.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes he combs his hair back and shaves the center of his black mustache, leaving only the corners. Other times he dons thick glasses and wears an untrimmed beard. Rafael Resendez-Ramirez changes his looks frequently and his name just as often, authorities say, using at least a dozen aliases. But he almost always travels by freight train. And he rolls from town to town, officials believe, killing people.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Accused "railroad" serial killer Angel Maturino Resendez was indicted in Houston on a capital murder charge in the December slaying of Claudia Benton, one of nine people he is suspected of killing. Prosecutors said they have not decided whether to seek the death penalty. Arraignment was set for today. Maturino Resendez, 39, is already charged in four slayings in Illinois, Texas and Kentucky. Police say evidence links him to five other Texas killings. Assistant Dist. Atty.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | Reuters
A suspected serial killer who gave himself up in Texas this week was apparently unaware that he could face execution in the Lone Star state, his attorney was quoted as saying in Thursday's Houston Chronicle. "He was just told he would be treated humanely. He interpreted that to mean that they would not try to kill him," court-appointed attorney Alan Tanner said. U.S. authorities believe Angel Maturino Resendez, a Mexican national, has killed at least nine people.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When accused killer Angel Maturino Resendez, who surrendered to authorities Tuesday, crossed from Mexico and shook hands with a Texas Ranger, it was more than the end of a fevered two-country manhunt. By insisting on giving up to the Rangers--the nation's oldest, perhaps most storied body of state lawmen--Resendez also was crossing a long bridge from past to present built by this once-bloody vigilante group, launched 176 years ago to defend white Texans.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alleged serial killer who for months darted cross-country by railroad, evading authorities and chilling communities from Texas to Kentucky, walked over a bridge to an El Paso border checkpoint Tuesday morning and gave himself up to authorities. Fulfilling an agreement brokered by his sister, 39-year-old Rafael Resendez-Ramirez pleasantly extended his hand to a Texas Ranger waiting with two other officers, then was handcuffed and led into custody.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
The man wanted in connection with eight slayings committed near railroad tracks was in the custody of immigration officials earlier this month but was let go, federal authorities said Friday. The Immigration and Naturalization Service arrested Rafael Resendez-Ramirez in the El Paso area during the first week of June for being in this country illegally and deported him to Mexico later the same day, the FBI said.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes he combs his hair back and shaves the center of his black mustache, leaving only the corners. Other times he dons thick glasses and wears an untrimmed beard. Rafael Resendez-Ramirez changes his looks frequently and his name just as often, authorities say, using at least a dozen aliases. But he almost always travels by freight train. And he rolls from town to town, officials believe, killing people.
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