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Serial Murders Washington State

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NEWS
October 27, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an excruciating confrontation with the families of his victims, serial killer Robert Yates Jr. tearfully turned to a crowded courtroom Thursday and apologized for "the sorrow, the pain and the anguish that you feel." He was sentenced to 408 years in prison for one of the longest murder rampages in U.S. history.
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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
The prosecution said Friday it will seek the death penalty for a convicted serial killer when he goes on trial for the murder of two women in western Washington. Robert L. Yates Jr. pleaded guilty in October to 13 murders dating to 1975 in other parts of the state, in a deal that allowed him to avoid the death penalty by agreeing to life in prison without parole. Pierce County Prosecutor Gerald A. Horne said that Yates, 48, does not merit leniency in the killings of Melinda L.
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NEWS
April 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police say a woman whose body was found on the same brushy hillside near Spokane where two presumed serial killing victims were discovered in December is likely the killer's seventh victim. An autopsy determined the body is that of Linda Marie Maybin, 34, missing since Nov. 22. Authorities said Maybin died of a gunshot wound, which is the same cause cited in the deaths of the six other women believed slain by the same killer.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an excruciating confrontation with the families of his victims, serial killer Robert Yates Jr. tearfully turned to a crowded courtroom Thursday and apologized for "the sorrow, the pain and the anguish that you feel." He was sentenced to 408 years in prison for one of the longest murder rampages in U.S. history.
NEWS
July 14, 1989
A former law student is a "viable suspect" in the Green River slayings, the nation's worst serial murder case, according to court documents. The case involves the deaths of 41 women and the disappearance of at least eight others in Washington and Oregon from 1982 to 1985. Almost all of the victims were linked to prostitution. William Jay Stevens II, 38, was named in an affidavit filed to support a search warrant for two of his residences in Spokane, Wash. He has not been charged.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A law student who attracted strong police suspicion in the nation's longest unsolved serial murder case is no longer considered a possible suspect, Seattle officers said. Gonzaga University Student Bar Assn. President William Jay Stevens II had been jailed in the deaths of 49 women, a case called the "Green River" killings, taking its name from a river near where the first five victims were found.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Green River Task Force of police assigned to solve the deaths and disappearances of dozens of women is being cut to a unit of seven, The Seattle Times reported. King County police will take over the investigation, which once involved 56 agents of local, state and federal law enforcement, the paper said. The remains of 41 of 49 women reported missing from January, 1982, through March, 1984, have been found, but the killer or killers remain unidentified.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
A man charged with shooting and killing eight prostitutes in one of the state's largest serial killing cases pleaded not guilty Wednesday. Robert Lee Yates Jr., 48, entered the pleas to aggravated first-degree murder stemming from the killings in Spokane in 1997 and 1998. He also pleaded not guilty to single counts of first-degree attempted murder and first-degree robbery stemming from an assault on a woman who survived.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
The prosecution said Friday it will seek the death penalty for a convicted serial killer when he goes on trial for the murder of two women in western Washington. Robert L. Yates Jr. pleaded guilty in October to 13 murders dating to 1975 in other parts of the state, in a deal that allowed him to avoid the death penalty by agreeing to life in prison without parole. Pierce County Prosecutor Gerald A. Horne said that Yates, 48, does not merit leniency in the killings of Melinda L.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
An hour after 200 people prayed and dropped rose petals from a bridge to remember five women apparently slain by a serial killer, police said there is a sixth victim. All six victims may have been involved in drugs, prostitution or both, said police Capt. Chuck Bown, a commander of a city-county task force investigating the killings. The women all died of gunshot wounds, and their bodies were found in rural areas, Bown said Thursday. Authorities would not say whether there are suspects.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
A man charged with shooting and killing eight prostitutes in one of the state's largest serial killing cases pleaded not guilty Wednesday. Robert Lee Yates Jr., 48, entered the pleas to aggravated first-degree murder stemming from the killings in Spokane in 1997 and 1998. He also pleaded not guilty to single counts of first-degree attempted murder and first-degree robbery stemming from an assault on a woman who survived.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A middle-age father of five who often cruised Spokane's red-light district in a flashy white Corvette is linked by DNA and other physical evidence to at least a dozen murders, authorities said Thursday. Spokane County Sheriff Mark K. Sterk said samples of DNA taken from Robert Lee Yates Jr. matched DNA found on the bodies of at least eight prostitutes. Other physical evidence links him to the murders of four other women, the sheriff said.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police say a woman whose body was found on the same brushy hillside near Spokane where two presumed serial killing victims were discovered in December is likely the killer's seventh victim. An autopsy determined the body is that of Linda Marie Maybin, 34, missing since Nov. 22. Authorities said Maybin died of a gunshot wound, which is the same cause cited in the deaths of the six other women believed slain by the same killer.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
An hour after 200 people prayed and dropped rose petals from a bridge to remember five women apparently slain by a serial killer, police said there is a sixth victim. All six victims may have been involved in drugs, prostitution or both, said police Capt. Chuck Bown, a commander of a city-county task force investigating the killings. The women all died of gunshot wounds, and their bodies were found in rural areas, Bown said Thursday. Authorities would not say whether there are suspects.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Green River Task Force of police assigned to solve the deaths and disappearances of dozens of women is being cut to a unit of seven, The Seattle Times reported. King County police will take over the investigation, which once involved 56 agents of local, state and federal law enforcement, the paper said. The remains of 41 of 49 women reported missing from January, 1982, through March, 1984, have been found, but the killer or killers remain unidentified.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A law student who attracted strong police suspicion in the nation's longest unsolved serial murder case is no longer considered a possible suspect, Seattle officers said. Gonzaga University Student Bar Assn. President William Jay Stevens II had been jailed in the deaths of 49 women, a case called the "Green River" killings, taking its name from a river near where the first five victims were found.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Convicted murderer Theodore Bundy confessed to at least nine killings while his lawyers maneuvered to block his execution scheduled for Tuesday, officials from two Western states said Saturday. Bundy confessed to killing at least eight young women in western Washington state in 1974, investigator Robert Keppel of the Washington attorney general's office said. Bundy also confessed to the 1975 murder of a 26-year-old Vail, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Docudrama: the good, the bad and the used, as television continues to be a history teacher with mixed results. On Sunday night, for example, HBO presents a movie about famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal that's highly worthy if somewhat lost in TV's blur of Holocaust stories. Meanwhile, the accuracy of NBC's recent account of the hunt for the infamous Hillside Stranglers has been bitterly attacked. And PBS is celebrating the 200th anniversary of America's presidency by airing the undistinguished miniseries "George Washington: The Forging of a Nation."
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
A man identified by police as a "viable suspect" in the Green River serial murder case issued a statement from jail saying: "I am not the Green River killer. The Green River Task Force has not treated me or my family fairly. They have made me out to be a very bad person, and I am not. People should know the fact that I have never hurt anyone in my life."
NEWS
July 14, 1989
A former law student is a "viable suspect" in the Green River slayings, the nation's worst serial murder case, according to court documents. The case involves the deaths of 41 women and the disappearance of at least eight others in Washington and Oregon from 1982 to 1985. Almost all of the victims were linked to prostitution. William Jay Stevens II, 38, was named in an affidavit filed to support a search warrant for two of his residences in Spokane, Wash. He has not been charged.
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