Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSerial Number
IN THE NEWS

Serial Number

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1985 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
A top official in the Los Angeles City Housing Authority has been charged with stealing lumber and equipment from the agency to help build a private home for himself in Riverside County. In honor of an unusual clue in the investigation, detectives said Thursday they have dubbed the case "The trail of the missing toilet." It was a porta-potty, they said, traced by its serial number from Housing Authority purchasing records to the Riverside job site, that helped crack the case. William H.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When not running Amazon, what does CEO Jeff Bezos do? Go looking for NASA's garbage. On Friday, Bezos confirmed that his team had retrieved the Apollo 11 No. 5 engine from the ocean floor on a mission in March. That was what they had hoped, but with the pieces stamped with serial numbers missing or corroded after decades under 14,000 feet of seawater, they weren't sure if idenfitication was possible. Now there is specific evidence that this hunk of metal is of the engine that first sent man to the moon.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In earlier wars prisoners such as Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Guy L. Hunter were under military orders to divulge nothing beyond their date of birth, name, rank and serial number. But the psychological damage to American POWs who buckled under the emotional and, at times, physical pain was finally recognized, and the military's Code of Conduct was changed in 1977 to help servicemen endure the hardship of imprisonment.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Shan Li
Bugaboo, the children's brand that introduced $1,000 strollers to the world, is recalling more than 50,000 of its Donkey and Cameleon models after finding a problem with the handle that poses a falling and choking hazard to children. The Dutch company said a button on the stroller's carrycot or seat carry handle can disengage and cause the handle to detach, which can injure tots. The voluntary recall affects about 46,300 strollers in the U.S. and an additional 4,440 in Canada. Bugaboo said it has received 58 reports of handles detaching, but so far they've heard of no injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989
Stolen portable phones are difficult to sell because of the problems concealing their true ownership. That was especially true for a man who brought a cellular phone to Muntz Electronics in Van Nuys for service Wednesday. A repairman, suspicious because the phone's serial number had been scratched out, checked its electronic serial number, which cannot be erased, a store manager said. He discovered it was the phone stolen April 23 from the auto of the shop's owner, Jim Muntz.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Shan Li
Bugaboo, the children's brand that introduced $1,000 strollers to the world, is recalling more than 50,000 of its Donkey and Cameleon models after finding a problem with the handle that poses a falling and choking hazard to children. The Dutch company said a button on the stroller's carrycot or seat carry handle can disengage and cause the handle to detach, which can injure tots. The voluntary recall affects about 46,300 strollers in the U.S. and an additional 4,440 in Canada. Bugaboo said it has received 58 reports of handles detaching, but so far they've heard of no injuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The Colburn School is offering a $1,000 reward for the safe return of a limited-edition contrabassoon that the music school says was stolen last week from a rehearsal room at its downtown campus. The instrument -- a Fox 950 model contrabassoon, serial number 622, less than a year old -- is one of only four in the world and worth $30,000. School officials say they will be unable to replace it in time for a Nov. 8 concert by the Colburn Orchestra at Pasadena's Ambassador Auditorium, although a school spokesman said the show would go on. The contrabassoon features a new fingering system developed by Arlen Fast of the New York Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When not running Amazon, what does CEO Jeff Bezos do? Go looking for NASA's garbage. On Friday, Bezos confirmed that his team had retrieved the Apollo 11 No. 5 engine from the ocean floor on a mission in March. That was what they had hoped, but with the pieces stamped with serial numbers missing or corroded after decades under 14,000 feet of seawater, they weren't sure if idenfitication was possible. Now there is specific evidence that this hunk of metal is of the engine that first sent man to the moon.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A young mother carried her baby, along with a loaded gun in a diaper bag, into a Philadelphia school where she had gone to sign up for classes, police said, one of two gun-in-school incidents reported in the city as the national debate on gun control raged in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., massacre. In the second incident Thursday, a high school student hid a gun in his shoe, but it was found when he walked through a metal detector. His gun was not loaded. But the weapon carried by 21-year-old Kelly Jones in the bottom of her pink-and-white diaper bag was fully loaded, police say, and Jones -- who was accompanied by her aunt and her baby when she was caught with it -- now faces criminal charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
There he sits, right in my living room, the little traitor. My own personal J. Edgar Hoover, all ready to drop a dime, to blow the whistle, to spill the beans about me any chance he gets. My rat-fink computer. It's been up and running for about a week, tricked out with a whiz-bang Intel chip that was the last word in chippery. Now I wonder: could I be harboring the enemy?
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A young mother carried her baby, along with a loaded gun in a diaper bag, into a Philadelphia school where she had gone to sign up for classes, police said, one of two gun-in-school incidents reported in the city as the national debate on gun control raged in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., massacre. In the second incident Thursday, a high school student hid a gun in his shoe, but it was found when he walked through a metal detector. His gun was not loaded. But the weapon carried by 21-year-old Kelly Jones in the bottom of her pink-and-white diaper bag was fully loaded, police say, and Jones -- who was accompanied by her aunt and her baby when she was caught with it -- now faces criminal charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The Colburn School is offering a $1,000 reward for the safe return of a limited-edition contrabassoon that the music school says was stolen last week from a rehearsal room at its downtown campus. The instrument -- a Fox 950 model contrabassoon, serial number 622, less than a year old -- is one of only four in the world and worth $30,000. School officials say they will be unable to replace it in time for a Nov. 8 concert by the Colburn Orchestra at Pasadena's Ambassador Auditorium, although a school spokesman said the show would go on. The contrabassoon features a new fingering system developed by Arlen Fast of the New York Philharmonic.
WORLD
June 25, 2008 | a Times Staff Writer
At meetings across the nation, officials of Zimbabwe's ruling party have warned voters how they will know who casts ballots against longtime President Robert Mugabe in Friday's scheduled runoff election: serial numbers. The officials tell people that the ballot number will allow the ruling party to identify who has voted for the opposition so that they can be killed later, according to people who attended meetings in three neighborhoods around Harare, the capital.
SPORTS
October 13, 2006 | Michael A. Hiltzik, Times Staff Writer
American cyclist Floyd Landis, whose victory in this year's Tour de France has been clouded by accusations of doping, on Thursday publicly outlined his legal defense. Landis posted a sheaf of documents on his website, www.floydlandis.com, along with a lengthy analysis by his doctor and former coach and a legal submission by his Agoura Hills-based attorney, Howard Jacobs.
NEWS
June 12, 2005 | Chuck Oxley, Associated Press Writer
Federal scientists are perfecting some new inventions designed to detect cash and even trace bills as they pass through society. The effort is supposed to root out drug and terrorism money, but some say it's yet another example of using technology to abuse personal freedoms. One device sniffs the air for the smell of money -- it can pick up a pile of cash from about 10 feet away. Another beams electrons through packages or luggage to detect trace metals in the green ink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
There he sits, right in my living room, the little traitor. My own personal J. Edgar Hoover, all ready to drop a dime, to blow the whistle, to spill the beans about me any chance he gets. My rat-fink computer. It's been up and running for about a week, tricked out with a whiz-bang Intel chip that was the last word in chippery. Now I wonder: could I be harboring the enemy?
WORLD
June 25, 2008 | a Times Staff Writer
At meetings across the nation, officials of Zimbabwe's ruling party have warned voters how they will know who casts ballots against longtime President Robert Mugabe in Friday's scheduled runoff election: serial numbers. The officials tell people that the ballot number will allow the ruling party to identify who has voted for the opposition so that they can be killed later, according to people who attended meetings in three neighborhoods around Harare, the capital.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
In this litigious age, it's getting harder and harder for employers to get honest answers when they check the references of a prospective employee. Tell someone a former employee is an inept jerk and you're liable to get sued. Tell someone that the inept jerk was "employee of the month" nine times and you're also liable to get sued. Name, rank and serial number are becoming the order of the day.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three former employees at Shiley Inc., the onetime Irvine medical device manufacturer, said the company recycled thousands of poorly manufactured artificial heart valves--and altered their serial numbers--to save money. "After Pfizer took over the company (in 1979), things changed and it seemed that the company's efforts were concentrated strictly on more production and not quality control," wrote former Shiley welder Wayne Runnells in a November, 1990, affidavit obtained by The Times.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
In this litigious age, it's getting harder and harder for employers to get honest answers when they check the references of a prospective employee. Tell someone a former employee is an inept jerk and you're liable to get sued. Tell someone that the inept jerk was "employee of the month" nine times and you're also liable to get sued. Name, rank and serial number are becoming the order of the day.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|