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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998
Last week, a number of people wrote letters chastising Kenneth Turan for his review of the film "Titanic" (" 'Titanic' Sinks Again, Spectacularly," Dec. 19). The tenor of the letters was that Turan had missed the point, it was the best movie some of these folks had ever seen, etc. Well, I decided to see it. My reaction: "Folks--Get a life!" The music and special effects were very good. But the film was "scriptless," the dialogue banal, the story slow to develop, and the hero and heroine frenetically running around the sinking ship in near freezing water was akin to the the endings in the old-time Saturday serials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Paloma Esquivel
The father of a man accused of raping and killing four women in Orange County said he doesn't believe his son is capable of carrying out the attacks. Dean Gordon said the family is embarrassed and trying to cope with the accusations. "He's been charged with something that is very serious," Dean Gordon said. "I'm devastated but I don't think my son is capable of that. " Steven Dean Gordon, 45, and Franc Cano, 27, are charged with the rape and murder of four women who disappeared in Orange County since last fall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS and All AFI Film Festival of Los Angeles events will take place at the Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont Ave., Hollywood, unless otherwise noted. Tickets are available at Ticketron, Teletron and at the box office one hour before show time. Information: (213) 520-2000 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
L istings and commentary for Week 2 of the American Film Institute Film Festival of Los Angeles, which runs through March 26: TUESDAY "Vendemiare" (France, 1919, 7:30 p.m., Melnitz Theater, UCLA).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Surrounded by police, a suspected serial killer in Anaheim quickly sliced the GPS device from his ankle, hopped on a bicycle and pedaled across the street. The registered sex offender didn't get far, said Ian Pummel, the owner of an Anaheim auto body shop where Steven Dean Gordon worked. Gordon and a second man are now in custody, charged with raping and killing four women. Police said both were on probation and wearing court-issued GPS devices when they committed the crimes, which date to last fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
M-I-C . . . K-E-Y. . . . Yep, Mousketeers, an all-new, five-day-a-week "Mickey Mouse Club" hits the tube today on the Disney Channel at 5:30 p.m. No, you won't find Annette, "Spin and Marty" serials, or mouse beanies--this is 1989, after all, not 1955. (There was another "new" Mickey Mouse Club, back in 1977, which ran two seasons.) Instead, you'll get the song and a fast-paced, imaginative gem of a show that, for all its innovative graphics, rock music and hi-tech feel, has a surprisingly familiar, cozy atmosphere--the good old days brought up to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | NANCY SPILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week Universal Studios released "The Little Rascals," a multimillion-dollar remake of the scruffy kid series that has charmed the world since its birth in 1922. This "Rascals" is remarkably faithful to the Hal Roach originals, right down to Alfalfa's cowlick, Darla's feminine mystique, Froggy's croak and the circle around Petey's eye. Even some of the original locations have been used, with filming in Burbank neighborhoods unchanged since the '20s and '30s.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consider two takes on Christopher Hubbart, serial rapist. State psychologist No. 1: He is a bright, shy 43-year-old man who is trying to control his sexual urges, and is truly sorry for his 34 victims. State psychologist No. 2: He is dangerous, unable to control his sexual urges and can be counted on to rape again.
BOOKS
February 16, 1992 | DAVE CHUTE
Apple-wood Books, of Cambridge, was the publisher of the Peter Leroy story in its original, serial installments. Thefirst two of these slim paperbacks were issued simultaneously in December, 1982; more followed in 1983. The plan was to release a new serving every three months. Return cards were included in most copies offering prepaid subscriptions. It was a wonderful, crackpot publishing scheme that seemed to fit the personalities of the books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991
I am struck by your quote from Deputy Dist. Atty. Dan Lamborn, "We live in a country of laws, we live in a country of rules," in explaining why the police did not have a DNA sample from (suspected serial killer) Cleophus Prince Jr. He added that "this isn't Baghdad, this isn't Moscow. This is San Diego." ("Police Queried Suspect After Third Killing," March 6.) Yes, this is the same place that can stop me at any time when I'm driving and demand a blood sample to test for alcohol.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | Peter Rainer
John Waters' latest, and one of his best, is like an early '60s TV sitcom that keeps lunging into profane naughtiness. Waters builds our disbelief of shows like "Leave It to Beaver" and "Ozzie & Harriet" right into the movie. He also builds into his movie the no-brained affection we have for these shows, but in the meantime there's the real world of serial murders and mania to contend with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Tethered to GPS devices and required to check in monthly with police, two convicted sex offenders so easily sidestepped efforts to monitor them that one was deemed safe enough to be formally released from state parole in the midst of what prosecutors now say was a months-long string of murders. Steven Dean Gordon, one of two transients accused of raping and murdering four women, was discharged from his state parole last November, a month after two of the women vanished from the streets of Santa Ana and just days before a third victim, a 28-year-old mother, was allegedly killed.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Christopher Hubbart has had a hard time trying to find a place to live, and no wonder. He's a serial rapist who assaulted women in the 1970s and '80s, was convicted and released, only to rape again. He was committed indefinitely to a mental facility until such time as he was determined by authorities to no longer be a threat. There was such a determination last summer, and it was upheld by a California court, but Hubbart waited while officials hunted for a place in Los Angeles County where he could live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
A serial rapist who admitted assaulting dozens of women in the 1970s and '80s and has been confined for nearly two decades because of his violent sexual tendencies could reside in an unincorporated area east of Palmdale after his release, state authorities announced Friday. A landlord has agreed to rent a single-family residence in a sparsely populated area in the 20000 block of East Avenue R to house Christopher Evans Hubbart, 63, who served about 15 years in prison for sexually assaulting at least 40 women and has been held in mental institutions since his release.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For those of us grown weary of the tortured white male detectives/criminals who occupy so much prime television real estate, "Those Who Kill," which premieres Monday on A&E, offers some small comfort. Not only is the tortured detective lead a woman, she's played by Chloë Sevigny, a performer of inevitable creativity and fearlessness. Here, she's Catherine Jensen, a new but fiercely brilliant homicide detective in the great city of Pittsburgh. Adapted by Glen Morgan ("The River," "The X-Files")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
The young woman suspected of killing a man she met on Craigslist in Pennsylvania, and who has claimed to have killed more than 20 others, including a victim in L.A., has been met with more skepticism than belief as authorities work to verify her story. Miranda Barbour's father says she is a manipulative liar. Her mother says she just wants to be left alone . And claiming she carried out the killings as part of a satanic cult, a high priest of the Church of Satan issued a statement, saying, "I find it difficult to believe that a 'killer cult' of any sort could be in operation before being noticed and their murderous members captured and prosecuted.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Despite the sunshine, gentle breezes and placid waters, something wicked this way comes in "Stranger by the Lake," French filmmaker Alain Guiraudie's tantalizingly erotic fable of love, passion and death. Though Guiraudie's work often circles around the complexities of sexual urges among gay men, he's never gotten as close to reality as he does in this film. At the same time, the writer-director casts a wide metaphorical net to examine that most fundamental human connection. Though the sex is fevered and explicit, the camera roaming over bodies with abandon, the questions raised are more abstract.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991
I am haunted by the 14-year-old Laotian boy who ran away naked and bleeding from Dahmer. The neighbors called the police, who sent him back to Dahmer because "they were two consenting adults who were having a homosexual argument." Couldn't the police have seen a 14-year-old boy begging not to go back? The three policemen were suspended with pay. I think they should be tried for murder. They were responsible for the boy's death. MARY WYCKOFF Oceanside
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RODNEY BOSCH
As Ventura turns . . . the saga continues. A lampooning, soap opera-esque look at local current events--starring Ventura gadflies, City Council members and local movers and shakers--is set to unfold, live before your eyes. "Live From the Livery"--held at Ventura's Old Towne Livery courtyard--is the brainchild of local actor-performer Pam Pilkenton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | David Colker
In 1989, attorney Ray Clark got a telephone call that would make him, for a while, one of the most famous lawyers in Los Angeles. The call to his small firm was from the presiding judge in the trial of Richard Ramirez, accused of being the brutal serial killer known as the Night Stalker. The defense team that Ramirez's family had hired was falling apart, and the judge wanted Clark to take over as lead defense counsel. Clark agreed, and soon became a fixture in printed and broadcast news accounts, protesting his client's innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The first time Armistead Maupin ended his "Tales of the City" serial - in 1989, with his sixth novel, "Sure of You" - he did it with a departure. Mary Ann Singleton, who had initiated the series by calling her mother in Cleveland to say she was staying in San Francisco, took a network TV job and left the Bay Area for New York. It was a sad if not unexpected outcome. In the 15 years since Maupin had first started writing about Mary Ann, her friends Michael, Mona, Brian and their irrepressible landlady, Anna Madrigal, a lot had happened: Anita Bryant, the People's Temple, AIDS.
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