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Sermid Al Sarraf

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The headlines from Baghdad may be filled with violence and mayhem, but Sermid Al-Sarraf sees a different Iraq beginning to bloom: a land where Americans and Iraqis are working together to restore independent courts, reform the penal code, and train judges and lawyers in human rights and international law. Al-Sarraf, a Southern Californian and son of Iraqi immigrants, currently on leave from his job as an attorney for the city of Los Angeles, is part of an ambitious venture that pairs U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The headlines from Baghdad may be filled with violence and mayhem, but Sermid Al-Sarraf sees a different Iraq beginning to bloom: a land where Americans and Iraqis are working together to restore independent courts, reform the penal code, and train judges and lawyers in human rights and international law. Al-Sarraf, a Southern Californian and son of Iraqi immigrants, currently on leave from his job as an attorney for the city of Los Angeles, is part of an ambitious venture that pairs U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A divided Los Angeles city panel recommended Wednesday that $3 million in bonds be issued to help purchase open space in Mandeville Canyon, despite claims by opponents that it is a bad use of money needed for inner-city parks. The steering committee for the Proposition K park tax measure voted 2 to 1 to ask the City Council to approve the bonds to help purchase 239 acres from Police Commissioner Bert Boeckmann as part of a larger package of $32 million in bonds for six projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Judge Judith Chirlin was sitting in the Internet cafe at the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad just 90 minutes before a truck slammed into the building and exploded, killing 23 people and injuring dozens more. She went to Iraq in August, representing the International Legal Assistance Consortium, a worldwide group of bar associations dedicated to "rebuilding justice in countries shattered by war."
WORLD
February 20, 2003 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
On the morning after the fall of Saddam Hussein, the hard work would begin. Ali Al-Attar is ready to lend a hand. The 39-year-old family practice physician has joined with more than 200 other Iraqi exiles to prepare for potential postwar crises, from cholera outbreaks to chemical weapons exposure. If given the opportunity, he will go back to help put those plans into action. "I have everything here, but I miss something important," he said. "I believe some part of me is still there.
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