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Serotonin Chemical

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NEWS
November 29, 1996 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Scientists for the first time have identified a personality gene that seems to influence whether a person will be a hand-wringing worrier or a self-assured warrior. The gene can act like natural Prozac in the brain, enhancing self-confidence and contributing to a cheerful temperament, according to a report in today's issue of the journal Science.
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NEWS
November 29, 1996 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Scientists for the first time have identified a personality gene that seems to influence whether a person will be a hand-wringing worrier or a self-assured warrior. The gene can act like natural Prozac in the brain, enhancing self-confidence and contributing to a cheerful temperament, according to a report in today's issue of the journal Science.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1991
The editorial is misleading on nuclear power as proposed in the Senate bill. Simple, basic and at no cost to taxpayers, nuclear licensing reform is essential just to allow nuclear power back into the marketplace. The next version of the bill is likely to include more subsidies and requirements for conservation. But the arithmetic is still obvious: Even with a massive national energy conservation program, the nation will need new base-load power plants by the end of the decade.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
New studies have for the first time directly confirmed the long-held belief that lower-than-normal levels of the brain chemical serotonin produce aggressive behavior in humans, researchers said Sunday. The studies, presented at a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, are expected to lead to new ways to treat potentially violent individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new drug may reduce or prevent nausea and vomiting from cancer chemotherapy with fewer side effects than older treatments, the manufacturer said last week. Administered intravenously, Zofran is the first of a new class of agents to be approved in the United States for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, said Glaxo Pharmaceuticals of Research Triangle Park, N.C.
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
A plate of spaghetti, a bowl of grits or a meal heavy in other carbohydrates can lift a person's spirits by increasing the amount of serotonin, a powerful chemical in the brain, according to a researcher. Dr. Richard Wurtman, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who discussed new findings here Sunday at the American Psychological Assn.'s annual conference, said some depression, obesity and even symptoms of premenstrual stress may be caused by shortages of serotonin.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A growing body of evidence suggests that diets and drugs that lower blood cholesterol levels may indirectly raise the risk of certain types of violent death by producing personality changes--inducing anger, irritability, aggressiveness and increased risk-taking. The studies have set off competing waves of concern and skepticism in the medical community.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
New studies have for the first time directly confirmed the long-held belief that lower-than-normal levels of the brain chemical serotonin produce aggressive behavior in humans, researchers said Sunday. The studies, presented at a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, are expected to lead to new ways to treat potentially violent individuals.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2001 | THOMAS CURWEN, Thomas Curwen is the deputy editor of The Times' Book Review
"Man is the only animal who has to be encouraged to live." Friedrich Nietzsche * 1. WHO KILLED HILDA? Sometimes when I'm in a dark mood, I wonder: If I were to kill myself, would I fall into the flames of hell? Or should someone else burn for this crime against life: the friends who failed me, the society that offered no solace, the God who erred in designing my brain, or DNA? Like hundreds of thousands of people who have confronted suicide, I wrestle with damnation.
SCIENCE
January 31, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Desert locusts are normally solitary individuals who eke out a meager subsistence while avoiding others of their species. But when food sources become abundant, such as after a rain, they transform into ravening packs of billions of insects that can strip a landscape bare. The key to the transformation, researchers said Friday, is the brain chemical serotonin, the chemical that in humans modulates anger, aggression, mood, appetite, sexuality and a host of other behaviors.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A growing body of evidence suggests that diets and drugs that lower blood cholesterol levels may indirectly raise the risk of certain types of violent death by producing personality changes--inducing anger, irritability, aggressiveness and increased risk-taking. The studies have set off competing waves of concern and skepticism in the medical community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1991
The editorial is misleading on nuclear power as proposed in the Senate bill. Simple, basic and at no cost to taxpayers, nuclear licensing reform is essential just to allow nuclear power back into the marketplace. The next version of the bill is likely to include more subsidies and requirements for conservation. But the arithmetic is still obvious: Even with a massive national energy conservation program, the nation will need new base-load power plants by the end of the decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new drug may reduce or prevent nausea and vomiting from cancer chemotherapy with fewer side effects than older treatments, the manufacturer said last week. Administered intravenously, Zofran is the first of a new class of agents to be approved in the United States for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, said Glaxo Pharmaceuticals of Research Triangle Park, N.C.
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
A plate of spaghetti, a bowl of grits or a meal heavy in other carbohydrates can lift a person's spirits by increasing the amount of serotonin, a powerful chemical in the brain, according to a researcher. Dr. Richard Wurtman, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who discussed new findings here Sunday at the American Psychological Assn.'s annual conference, said some depression, obesity and even symptoms of premenstrual stress may be caused by shortages of serotonin.
HEALTH
January 6, 2003 | Amanda Ursell, Special to The Times
"Giving up smoking is easy," claimed Mark Twain. "I've done it a thousand times." Fortunately, the average smoker is able to quit smoking after three or four attempts -- and many will begin their efforts in the new year. Although nicotine patches, hypnotism and acupuncture may increase a smoker's odds of successfully quitting the habit, what you eat -- and when -- can help ameliorate symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, including irritability, depression, insomnia and weight gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Taking an aspirin every other day can significantly cut down on the occurrence of migraine, according to new research that offers hope to many of the estimated 25 million Americans who suffer from the excruciating, inexplicable headaches. The finding, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., suggests yet another surprising new use for the old drug. Over the past few years, aspirin has been found to prevent heart attacks, stroke and pregnancy-induced hypertension.
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