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BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Mario Batali, the pony-tailed celebrity chef and Los Angeles restaurant owner, has agreed to pay $5.25 million to settle the class-action lawsuit in which he was accused of bilking servers out of part of their tips, according to a Bloomberg News report . Batali, who is frequently seen on television and touts a line of products including cookbooks and kitchenware, was sued in a New York federal court along with his business partner Joseph Bastianich,...
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
In a victory for Hollywood's anti-piracy efforts, the trade group representing the major studios has won a legal fight against Hotfile, one of the largest file sharing sites on the Internet. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida on Wednesday  found Hotfile liable for copyright infringement and rejected Hotfile's defense under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The court further held that Hotfile's principal, Anton Titov, was personally liable for Hotfile's infringement as well.  This case marked the first time that a U.S. court has ruled on whether so-called cyberlockers like Hotfile can be held liable for their infringing business practices.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2000
The reporter obviously did not speak with those people in Cuba who know about the Internet. Moreover, if the reporter wanted to know how many servers there are in Cuba, all one needs to do is go to http://www.cubanic.cu/buscar/search.html. How many people have accounts? Unknown. Real and virtual servers are found, but one needs to know where to look! A simple search of the Internet will reveal hundreds of virtual servers, i.e. black market accounts. NELSON P. VALDES Professor, Sociology Department University of New Mexico Albuquerque
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
When Thomas Trappler talks clouds, companies listen. But he's not warning about rain. Rather, Trappler is a "cloud" consultant, who tells attorneys, executives and fellow information technology experts what to look out for when they put company databases in the so-called cloud. As more companies rely on remote cloud servers to store their files, Trappler has become a highly sought-after security advisor, a celebrity of sorts in the rapidly growing cloud computing industry. "No one's teaching people about this," Trappler said.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The U.S. director of national intelligence late Thursday confirmed the existence of a secret program in which the government has tapped into the central servers of nine leading Internet companies to search for data potentially linked to terrorism, espionage or nuclear proliferation, but he called two newspapers' disclosure of it "reprehensible. " Under the 6-year-old program, code-named PRISM, the FBI and National Security Agency have searched for emails, videos, photographs and other documents.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2006
The article about a U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission lawsuit accusing restaurant chain Lawry's of discriminating against men as servers ("A Beef With Lawry's: Rare Male Servers," April 5) notes that about one-fifth of gender discrimination cases are filed by men. Wouldn't that indicate that four-fifths of the discrimination is still against women, and they still need a "helping hand" even in this century? It would seem that the management of Lawry's, rather than being slapped with a discrimination suit, should be applauded for having been way ahead of its time, and for continuing that much-needed helping hand.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they had charged two men with stealing e-mail addresses and other information from about 120,000 Apple iPad tablet users. Daniel Spitler, 26, of San Francisco and Andrew Auernheimer, 25, of Fayetteville, Ark., each were accused last week of conspiring to hack into AT&T Inc.'s servers and possessing subscriber data from those servers, according to the U.S. attorney's office in New Jersey, where the case is being prosecuted. Prosecutors said the criminal charges stem from a "brute force" hacking spree that took place over several days last June.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001 | Reuters
Gateway Inc. said it will cut 140 production jobs in California as part of a broader restructuring announced earlier this month. The San Diego-based company said it will shift production of its server computers to its main North American plant in North Sioux City, S.D., resulting in about 140 layoffs at a plant in Orange County. Gateway will maintain sales, marketing and product development operations in Lake Forest, a spokesman said.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2012 | Bloomberg News
A California judge has ruled that Oracle Corp. is contractually obligated to continue developing software for Hewlett-Packard Co.'s Itanium-based servers. The decision Wednesday by Judge James P. Kleinberg in San Jose advances Hewlett-Packard's lawsuit to a jury trial to determine whether Oracle broke the contract and what, if any, damages should be awarded. Both sides have 15 days to file an objection to the decision, the judge said. The judge agreed with Hewlett-Packard that Oracle made a commitment to support Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
While most of Southern California's office rental market remains as anemic as the economy, one niche is experiencing robust growth: heavily secured offices where businesses house their all-important computer servers. Nearly all of us send and receive signals through data centers every day. Simple tasks like browsing a website, paying a restaurant bill with a credit card or making a phone call may require their services. In Los Angeles County, there are only about a dozen of these specialized buildings that protect the precious data of banks, oil companies, stores and all manner of other firms.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Kaleidescape makes a highly regarded line of home media servers, but it faces at least two major hurdles to growth. First, it's been embroiled in a years-long battle with the entertainment industry over the legality of its core products. And second, the price tag on those products -- the entry-level Kaleidescape system costs around $15,000 -- confines them to the ultra-luxury niche. On Tuesday, the company is making a significant step toward hurdling the second barrier by releasing a $4,000 media server, dubbed the Cinema One. That's still a bridge too far for the typical DVD renter, but it's no longer out of reach for homeowners who splurge on custom home theater installations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Please. Let's stop focusing on the overpaid, tormented young man who last week revealed the National Security Administration's Power Point Plan for Total Electronic World Domination. Let's focus instead on what our nation's wiretapping agency has actually been up to, whether America's technology giants have been complicit in an unprecedented and sweeping electronic intrusion and, most important, whether we think allowing the government access to our phone calls, email, video and voice chats, photos and file transfers is the price we must pay for security in the post 9/11 world.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook and other major tech companies have data centers to support what they like to call "cloud" computing, or the ability for users to store and work with files remotely. But in the early days of Facebook's first data center, an actual indoor rain cloud brought down the company's Web cloud, Jay Parikh, Facebook vice president of infrastructure engineering, recently said. In summer 2011, Facebook's Prineville, Ore., data center suffered a problem in the building management system that caused the air used to cool the servers to reach temperatures of more than 80 degrees and the humidity to exceed 95%. As a result, the air condensed and formed a rain cloud inside the data center.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Employees at Trademob , a Berlin-based mobile app marketing platform, noticed something curious two days ago.  In a routine scan of their logs, they noticed what appeared to be evidence of someone testing a new iPhone and iPad using the new iOS 7. No surprise that someone would be testing iOS 7. After all, it's expected to be unveiled Monday at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco. PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 But Trademob Chief Executive Ravi Kamran said what caught the eye of folks at the company were identifiers for hardware they had not seen before.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The U.S. director of national intelligence late Thursday confirmed the existence of a secret program in which the government has tapped into the central servers of nine leading Internet companies to search for data potentially linked to terrorism, espionage or nuclear proliferation, but he called two newspapers' disclosure of it "reprehensible. " Under the 6-year-old program, code-named PRISM, the FBI and National Security Agency have searched for emails, videos, photographs and other documents.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Jon Healey
My last post , which attempted to rebut claims that Obamacare would have the Internal Revenue Service reviewing personal medical records, wasn't as reassuring to some readers as I'd hoped. In fact, several said the proof of the agency's interest in medical records was already out there, in the form of a class-action lawsuit filed this year that claims the IRS seized "at least 6 million identifiable medical records" belonging to about 10 million Americans. Reader "GIJay" asked, "Healy[sic]
SPORTS
June 27, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
An. Absurd. Tennis. Match. With. Really. Short. Points. And. Almost. Zero. Rallies. Played. Wimbledon. On. Friday. Really, that thing on Court No. 1 between 6-foot-10, No. 33-ranked Ivo Karlovic and charismatic, No. 9-ranked Jo-Wilfried Tsonga hearkened to the 1990s, when pulverizing servers such as Goran Ivanisevic and Richard Krajicek made tennis savants wring their hands. And the weird thing is that Karlovic vs. Tsonga counted as weird.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, Los Angeles Times
With the advent of Google Drive, we talk about cloud computing as if the bits and bytes of our lives are stored somewhere up in the air, but, really, the "clouds" are very terrestrial. What's more up in the air are the laws that govern who can access your stuff and how. Originally a way for geeks to explain to the rest of us the notion of remote servers storing and serving up content, cloud computing can be defined several ways, depending on whom you ask. In some ways, even email is a form of cloud computing.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Customers trying to use JPMorgan Chase's website were frustrated again by four hours of disrupted service, but there was a twist this time: The outages were caused by a technical problem with the bank's systems, not by a cyber attack. The intermittent service disruptions began a little after 9 a.m. Pacific time on Monday. The New York-based bank advised customers to use its mobile banking services while it worked "to get things up to full speed. " The site was functioning well Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013
Actress Valerie Harper plans to discuss her brain cancer with some television doctors. The daytime talk show "The Doctors" said Harper will appear Monday to talk with Travis Stork, Lisa Masterson and Andrew Ordon, as well as her own team of doctors. The 1970s sitcom star has been diagnosed with a rare brain cancer and told she has as little as three months to live. She said her husband briefly withheld the diagnosis from her because it was so dire. Harper, now 73, played Rhoda Morgenstern on television's "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and its spinoff, "Rhoda.
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