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BUSINESS
November 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The nation's service economy grew in October at a quicker pace than in September and faster than analysts had expected, according to a survey released Friday. The Institute for Supply Management, a nonprofit organization, said its index of business activity for the service sector registered 57.1 in October. That's above September's reading of 52.9, which was a three-year low, and August's reading of 57. Analysts had been predicting 54.5.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The severe weather that has hit much of the country this winter has cost the economy nearly $50 billion in lost productivity and 76,000 jobs, according to a new survey. Snow, ice and bitter cold will shave about 0.3 percentage point from economic growth, according to Wall Street economists, fund managers and strategists polled by CNBC. In an economy with about $15.7 trillion in total output, or gross domestic product, that comes to about $47 billion. PHOTOS: Federal Reserve chairs through the years The weather that has made much of the country at times look like it could host the Winter Olympics also hindered labor market growth, partly causing the disappointing government jobs reports in December and January.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | STEVE CHAWKINS
My friend looked over the menu at a Ventura restaurant and ordered a half-sandwich and a cup of soup. "I'll have to check," the waitress said. "You'll have to check?" "We don't have half-sandwich-and-soup on the menu. Just full-sandwich-and-soup. So I'll have to check." A minute later, she returned. "We don't do half-sandwiches." My friend was surprisingly calm.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. NEW YORK -- The nation's job numbers for February were encouraging, with employers adding 236,000 positions over the month, far exceeding analysts' expectations. But break down the job numbers by sector, and a trend emerges - it's the service sector that is leading the recovery. Employers in the service sector have added 179,000 jobs over the last month, while manufacturing added just 14,000 and construction just 48,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1990
A recent news story in Orange County reveals a much greater threat to "our way of life" than Saddam Hussein. The story was about the loss of 400 jobs in Santa Ana at A&E Systems and the company's move to Indiana, "A&E Systems Plant Will Be Shut Down," (Aug. 24) by Leslie Berkman. The decision was motivated by local environmental-protection requirements on spray-painting and metal-coating, as well as the fact that Indiana is a lower-cost area. Where is the money going to come from, if not from industrial employment?
NEWS
January 26, 1990
It seems to me that inanities like "Mega-Optimists" (Jan. 17) ought to be relegated to the astrology column where they belong. While people like the Naisbitts ("Megatrends 2000" authors John Naisbitt and Patricia Aburdene) try to put a veneer of respectability on their crystal ball by using computers to make their predictions sound like science, anyone who knows anything about computers or science knows that futurism is a con act. The reason people like the Naisbitts are popular is the same reason ancient kings hired prophets and modern rulers hire "experts."
BUSINESS
June 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Growth in the nation's service economy, coupled with recent data showing the manufacturing sector is humming, suggests the broader economy may be shaking off slumps in the housing and automotive industries. The Institute for Supply Management, based in Tempe, Ariz., said Tuesday its index of business activity in the nonmanufacturing sector registered a faster-than-expected pace of 59.7 in May. The reading was higher than April's reading of 56 and Wall Street's expectation of 56.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1985
The Times' excellent article on the failing Kaiser empire (Aug. 4) is really the tip of the iceberg in a much larger and tragic story. We were the pioneers and world's unquestioned leader in virtually every industrial and technological field. We are fast becoming a bumbling giant and our economic wealth is sifting through our fingers like sand. We are converting to a service economy but in doing so we are casting aside all our tools of generating economic wealth. What can be the end result of full conversion to a service economy?
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. NEW YORK -- The nation's job numbers for February were encouraging, with employers adding 236,000 positions over the month, far exceeding analysts' expectations. But break down the job numbers by sector, and a trend emerges - it's the service sector that is leading the recovery. Employers in the service sector have added 179,000 jobs over the last month, while manufacturing added just 14,000 and construction just 48,000.
OPINION
April 13, 2008
Re "A 670-mile-long shrine to American insecurity," Opinion, April 7 Maybe it would be better to call the border fence a 670-mile-long shrine to American frustration or American ineptness. Gregory Rodriguez is right that we are to blame for the current situation and uses many historical references to give some perspective on today's immigration. However, these are not the same United States as at the turn of the 20th century or World War II. We have gone from a manufacturing to a service economy, and even many service jobs have been outsourced.
OPINION
April 13, 2008
Re "A 670-mile-long shrine to American insecurity," Opinion, April 7 Maybe it would be better to call the border fence a 670-mile-long shrine to American frustration or American ineptness. Gregory Rodriguez is right that we are to blame for the current situation and uses many historical references to give some perspective on today's immigration. However, these are not the same United States as at the turn of the 20th century or World War II. We have gone from a manufacturing to a service economy, and even many service jobs have been outsourced.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Growth in the nation's service economy, coupled with recent data showing the manufacturing sector is humming, suggests the broader economy may be shaking off slumps in the housing and automotive industries. The Institute for Supply Management, based in Tempe, Ariz., said Tuesday its index of business activity in the nonmanufacturing sector registered a faster-than-expected pace of 59.7 in May. The reading was higher than April's reading of 56 and Wall Street's expectation of 56.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The nation's service economy grew in October at a quicker pace than in September and faster than analysts had expected, according to a survey released Friday. The Institute for Supply Management, a nonprofit organization, said its index of business activity for the service sector registered 57.1 in October. That's above September's reading of 52.9, which was a three-year low, and August's reading of 57. Analysts had been predicting 54.5.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2004 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
For several months, the city known as "Titletown" -- for its football prowess -- has been earning recognition of a different sort. Green Bay was the nation's fifth-fastest-growing job market in June. The previous month, it tied Laredo, Texas, for first place. But Steve Anderson sees little to celebrate.
BOOKS
March 17, 2002 | D.T. MAX, D.T. Max is a contributing editor to the Paris Review.
Memoirs are normally acts of exorcism, but "Selling Ben Cheever" is more an act of masochism. Having received a chilly reception from his publishers when he approached them with the draft of a new novel, his third, Ben Cheever decided to quit writing and take a series of service jobs. "This is a book about failure," he writes in his preface, "and I haven't even been consistently successful at that." That's an odd, courageous and profoundly un-American thing to say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | STEVE CHAWKINS
My friend looked over the menu at a Ventura restaurant and ordered a half-sandwich and a cup of soup. "I'll have to check," the waitress said. "You'll have to check?" "We don't have half-sandwich-and-soup on the menu. Just full-sandwich-and-soup. So I'll have to check." A minute later, she returned. "We don't do half-sandwiches." My friend was surprisingly calm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1994
David Lamb's June 29 article, "Independence Brings Little Change in Djibouti," sadly evidences his contempt and dislike of Africa. Lamb ignores the extent of physical and infrastructure development which has taken place, from the fine network of roads and bridges, the regionally unequaled modern port, the state-of-the-art modern telecommunications system which makes Djibouti an important hub, and the explosive growth in schools. Most notable though, aside from the isolated foreign invasion discussed below, Djibouti has been calm and peaceful, providing extensive social services to its inhabitants, including its large refugee population.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
When Far Eastern competition drove Alan Ungar's clothing factory out of business in the late 1970s, the Los Angeles native was forced to examine his life anew: "I had three priorities," he recalls. "One was to be able to play racquetball every morning. The second was not to have any inventory. The third was to be able to take time off when I wanted time off--and I've gotten all of them." Ungar, 51, got his wishes by making a jarring about-face in careers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997 | ROB SELNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County welfare rolls have fallen to their lowest levels in six years, as recipients have been swept up by a booming economy and pushed into jobs by retooled employment programs or by fear that their days on welfare are numbered. The number of families on welfare in the county dropped by more than 1,400 from June 1996 to June 1997, a far more dramatic drop than the 300 cases the previous year, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1994
David Lamb's June 29 article, "Independence Brings Little Change in Djibouti," sadly evidences his contempt and dislike of Africa. Lamb ignores the extent of physical and infrastructure development which has taken place, from the fine network of roads and bridges, the regionally unequaled modern port, the state-of-the-art modern telecommunications system which makes Djibouti an important hub, and the explosive growth in schools. Most notable though, aside from the isolated foreign invasion discussed below, Djibouti has been calm and peaceful, providing extensive social services to its inhabitants, including its large refugee population.
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