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Service Fees

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NEWS
November 30, 1989
The City Council voted Tuesday to raise city service fees, despite protests by some residents. Fees will be raised for services such as recreation, building inspections, environmental reviews, library use, parking and vehicle code enforcement. Certain fees were exempted for further study. They include a proposed new fee for responding to a false alarm and an increase in sewer and water service fees.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien, Salvador Rodriguez and Jim Puzzanghera
A federal appeals court swept aside government regulations designed to ensure equal access to the Internet, raising the prospects of higher fees for consumers and more barriers for start-ups seeking to compete online. The decision Tuesday could allow AT&T Inc., Verizon Communications Inc. and other Internet service providers to charge the likes of Netflix and YouTube more money to deliver movies and video to their customers. The ruling also throws into disarray the efforts of the Federal Communications Commission to limit telecom and cable firms from discriminating against certain Internet traffic by slowing speeds, impeding access or raising fees.
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BUSINESS
September 16, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Emboldened by its highest profits since the dot-com boom, Charles Schwab Corp. is dropping its remaining account service fees in the latest step back to the stock brokerage's low-cost heritage. The decision to drop the service fees, announced Thursday and effective Oct. 1, affects about 650,000 account holders with household balances below $25,000. Shares of San Francisco-based Schwab fell 18 cents to $14.32, but the price is up nearly 20% year to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tea time at Sardi's, and in rushed Bette Midler too busy to give her caricature on the far wall an admiring glance. She had just finished taping an appearance on Katie Couric's talk show and, like me, had plans to see Mike Nichols' starry production of "Betrayal" later that evening. (Unlike me, her companion was Glenn Close.) In short, it was a typical run, run, run New York day. For the moment, however, Midler's attention was focused on "a creature of Beverly Hills," the late Hollywood super-agent Sue Mengers.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. regulators may consider limiting fees that telephone and cable companies can charge subscribers who cancel their service before contracts expire. The Federal Communications Commission, which already is examining early-termination fees for wireless service, should also investigate cancellation charges for land-line phone, Internet and cable TV contracts, FCC Chairman Kevin J. Martin said.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It is almost impossible to purchase a ticket at face value to a concert anywhere in Southern California these days--even if you do not shop at a broker. Why do concert tickets so frequently end up costing more than the advertised price? Sellers add a variety of service fees, which profit the ticket agency handling the transaction and the venue staging the event. Take the March 31 environmental benefit, "Concert for Walden Woods," at the Universal Amphitheatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1995
Re "Pearl Jam to Reconsider Its Ticketmaster Boycott" (June 14). You left out one fairly important point: Pearl Jam's tickets are virtually impossible to scalp. I received my tickets for San Francisco, and they have my name printed on them and a bar code with which to "scan them for authenticity." Enclosed with my tickets was a letter reminding me to bring "a valid driver's license or another form of ID." The Ticketmaster system is flawed in more ways than just service fees, and I think Pearl Jam was addressing more than the hypocrisy of Ticketmaster's monopoly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | TOMMY LI
Students attending Glendale Community College this fall will have to dig deeper into their wallets if they want their grades sent home, ID cards validated or official transcripts ordered. Those are among the nearly $150 in increased student and service fees approved recently by college trustees. Most are one-time only, new student or optional expenses. New fees range from refund requests to late registration for classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
The Simi Valley City Council has voted to raise fines and service fees for everything from parking violations to water hookups. The council voted Monday to approve the new schedule of fees and fines, saying the increases are needed to offset the rising costs to the city of providing certain services. The increases are not intended to raise revenues, city officials said. The new fees and fines will take effect March 27. The council agreed to raise all planning fees about 7%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1994 | JEFF McDONALD
Fees for services provided by the city of Ojai could more than double under a consultant's proposal to recoup diminishing revenues by increasing the cost of various services. Citing escalating costs and an ever-shrinking budget, the City Council on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to the fee-increase plan, which would, for example, raise the cost of a zone change from $750 to $2,268 or more.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | David Lazarus
It's long been a basic tenet of the business world: You give us more business, we'll reward your loyalty with better deals. That's how cable companies operate with their service packages. That's how phone companies work. And until now, that's pretty much how banks played things as well. Want to avoid checking-account fees? Maintain a higher balance or, better yet, take out a home loan. As of this month, however, about 2 million erstwhile Bank of America mortgage customers are scrambling to figure out their status after the bank sold servicing rights to their accounts to a company called Nationstar Mortgage.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A prepaid cellular company controlled by Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim is taking fire as it moves to expand in the lucrative California market. TracFone Wireless Inc., which has more than 21 million users in the United States, is the country's biggest player in the fast-growing business of selling low-cost cellphones and prepaid minutes - often to low-income customers. These phones, typically costing users as little as $20 for a phone and 60 minutes of use, appeal to many customers who don't want or can't afford to sign yearlong or multiyear contracts.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
For the first time, struggling BlackBerry maker Research in Motion saw a decline in its subscriber base, reporting that the number of customers declined to 79 million in its fiscal third quarter.   Three months ago, the Canadian company had 80 million subscribers. Revenue for the third quarter was $2.7 billion, down 47% from $5.2 billion in the same quarter a year earlier. The company posted a loss of $9 million, or 2 cents a share, compared with a profit of $265 million, or 51 cents a share, a year earlier.  Excluding one-time items, the company reported a loss of $114 million, or 22 cents a share.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Colorado's String Cheese Incident will be swinging through town Friday and the bluegrass-folk jam band has come up with a canny way to sidestep ticket fees for its legendarily supportive fans. For many of the venues on the group's itinerary, band officials worked out agreements to leave off the service fees that can add 30% or 40% to fans' out-of-pocket costs. For its stop at the Greek Theatre, that wasn't possible, so the group fronted fans cash to purchase batches of tickets directly from the venue's box office, which doesn't charge service or handling fees.
TRAVEL
February 27, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Money alone sets all the world in motion," said Publilius Syrus, an ancient Latin writer known for aphorisms. But how do you set your money in motion when you travel? Whether check, card or currency, each method has its pluses and minuses. So it's best to take money in various forms, do some research and plan ahead. "The middle of a foreign country is not the place to figure out how to use your credit card at an ATM," said John Oldshue, partner at LowCards.com, a consumer website that compares credit cards.
TRAVEL
November 7, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times staff writer
If you plan to fly with your favorite board to catch gnarly surf, get ready for a wild ride - financially, that is. Many airlines charge $100 or more each way to take surfboards as checked baggage. A few charge nothing. So check it out before you check it in. And be glad you're not a professional surfer. "It's mind-blowing how expensive it is to travel with surfboards," said Hawaiian pro surfer Fred Patacchia Jr. "I just recently went to Europe on American Airlines and was charged $150 per board, traveling with nine boards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1992 | ROSE APODACA
After more than an hourlong public hearing, the City Council voted 4-1 this week to pass a resolution supportive of a hike in water rates and services fees but did not adopt a proposed 16-cent increase. Instead, the council will review the current rate as it considers the city budget, which is expected to be ready for adoption later this month. Councilman Frank Fry Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994 | WILLSON CUMMER
The City Council raised some community service fees this week, and extended a temporary ordinance that places strict controls on adult entertainment businesses that might seek to open in the city. The council voted unanimously to increase the fees to recover the costs of providing services to residents and others. None of the new fees are higher than the costs to the city, according to city officials. The fees take effect July 1 and are expected to generate $81,000 in revenues.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Regulators should have foreseen a wave of suspect foreclosure paperwork coming, a key official admitted Monday as federal banking agencies said they had launched their own in-depth review of the issue. "In retrospect, there were warning signs that servicing standards were eroding," Sheila Bair, chairwoman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., told a housing finance conference in Arlington, Va. "Those signs should have caused market participants and regulators alike to question current practices.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2008 | from times wire reports
A California appeals court says Farmers Insurance Co. broke the law by failing to disclose a $5 service charge -- but the company won't have to pay back the more than $115 million it collected. The 4th District Court of Appeals in Santa Ana ruled that Farmers had violated a state code by failing to disclose the $5 it adds to monthly premiums to cover billing costs. The fee isn't charged to customers who pay the premium in a lump sum.
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